Here's what you need to know to decide how to vote on California's Proposition 59.

Prop 59 - Overturn Citizens United Ruling

ICYMI: the 2016 election will be held on Tuesday, November 8, with early voting kicking off at San Francisco’s City Hall on Tuesday, October 11.

In addition to voting for officials at the local, state, and national level, San Franciscans will face a decision on 17 state ballot initiatives and 25 local propositions.

Not sure how to vote on Proposition 59? We hope the brief voter guide below will help you decide!

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What Is Prop 59?

Prop 59 would ask state elected officials to use their full authority to overturn the US Supreme Court’s ruling in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission in order to regulate campaign contributions and spending.

Specifically, the proposition asks:

“Shall California’s elected officials use all of their constitutional authority, including, but not limited to, proposing and ratifying one or more amendments to the United States Constitution, to overturn Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission (2010) 558 U.S. 310, and other applicable judicial precedents, to allow the full regulation or limitation of campaign contributions and spending, to ensure that all citizens, regardless of wealth, may express their views to one another, and to make clear that corporations should not have the same constitutional rights as human beings?”

Who Supports Prop 59?

Key supporters of Prop 59 include: the California Democratic Party.

Supporters argue that Prop 59 would limit excessive political spending by corporations by overturning the Supreme Court ruling in the Citizens United case.

Who Opposes Prop 59?

Key opponents of Prop 59 include: Senator Jeff Stone (R-LaQuinta) and Assemblymember K.H. Achadjian (R-San Luis Obispo).

Opponents argue that Prop 59 would hurt small businesses and other entities that are registered as corporations.

Moreover, opponents contend that, as a non-binding advisory question, the proposition would merely serve as a “feel-good” measure without actually guaranteeing any action on campaign contributions.

Learn More about Prop 59

To learn more, read the full text of Proposition 59.

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