Gov 2.0 News

March 5, 2012

Administrator John Pistole expresses hopes for expanding trusted traveler programs.

Some studies show that integrating social media into college coursework may be helping students learn better.

Neighborhoods lack access to affordable, healthy foodMore than a third of Baltimore neighborhoods don't have ready access to healthy foods, leaving one in five residents to rely on high-fat, high-calorie meals from corner stores and carryout restaurants, a new assessment shows.

March 3, 2012

in one Florida elementary school, administrators are handing out "FCAT power bars" to improve students scores on the state's dreaded standardized tests.

State lawmakers across the U.S. are crafting legislation that would add military service to veterans' driver's licenses so they will not have to carry official discharge papers to prove their service.

WASHINGTON - The government is looking to sell off some of its stock of homes in foreclosure.

February 28, 2012

Government agencies are embracing social media, using Facebook, Twitter, and other platforms to inform and interact with the public. Take a look at the best examples of social networking in government.

Robert Poole reports on efforts across the country to reduce freeway congestion through HOV-to-HOT conversion and public-private partnerships.
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February 25, 2012

Watch Video Listen to the Audio JEFFREY BROWN: And finally tonight: an arts program that is changing lives in the nation's public schools. More than 50 schools have adopted a music education curriculum based on a system developed in Venezuela. The NewsHour special correspondent for education, John Merrow, reports on the Harmony Program in New York City. JOHN MERROW: Here in New York City, it's not hard to find an elegant black-tie fund-raiser where guests pay $1,000 or more to enjoy a live orchestra, sip champagne and hobnob with celebrities like Placido Domingo. Affairs like this happen ...

The app is a mobile-friendly version of the IRS's "Where's My Return?" site.

Students at Catholic high schools in Brockton and Braintree will start the next school year with iPads instead of papers and books in their backpacks, part of a growing number of schools looking to trade traditional learning tools for the latest technology. Not far behind Cardinal Spellman and Archbishop Williams are public school counterparts in Brockton as well as Cohasset and Sharon that are test-driving Apple tablets and their Windows competitors, or are leaning toward doing so.

New York City is taking steps to manage the dumping of raw sewage, Mireya Navarro reports.
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New Hampshire is using a $10 million federal grant to help people with serious mental illnesses become more physically fit.

February 23, 2012

As Nevada becomes the first state in the country to approve self-driving cars, Robert Bruegmann considers what changes to the built environment driverless cars could have.
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A new program would require banks to send officials to court who have the power to alter loans to keep people in their homes.

Police officers in some towns are getting another set of eyes, wearable cameras that capture the officer's and the suspects' every move.

Researchers will use National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence to develop new products and services to combat cybersecurity threats faced by U.S. government agencies and companies.

February 22, 2012

February 18, 2012

Zak Stone reports on a campaign in Chattanooga, Tennessee to distill the city's artistic and entrepreneurial spirit into a font, and asks the question - can a font help a city make a comeback?
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Paid for by Phil Ting for Assembly 2012. FPPC ID# 1343137