SF News

Friday Morning News Roundup

Bakers Convcited of First-Degree Murder for Killing of Journalist

Family members and friends of journalist Chauncey Bailey expressed relief Thursday that Your Black Muslim Bakery leader Yusuf Bey IV and an associate were convicted of first-degree murder for Bailey's shooting death nearly four years ago.

Prosecutor Melissa Krum told jurors during a trial that lasted two-and-a-half months that Bey, 25, ordered the killing of Bailey, 57, to prevent him from writing an article about the bakery's financial problems.

The bakery was in the midst of bankruptcy proceedings when Bailey was killed near the corner of 14th and Alice streets in downtown Oakland, only a few blocks away from where the trial was held, in broad daylight Aug. 2, 2007, and closed its doors later that year.

Krum said Bey was also upset at Bailey for writing articles about the child molestation charges that his father, bakery founder Yusuf Bey, faced when he died in 2003 at the age of 67.

Bailey's death was the first time in many years that an American journalist was killed over a domestic story. Bailey's cousin, Wendy Ashley-Johnson, said the jury's verdict sends a message that "journalists have a job to do and shouldn't be squashed."

Ashley-Johnson said, "Unfortunately, that's what happened to Chauncey and it should never happen again."

She said, "I'm glad it's over now and Chauncey can rest and we can go on with the rest of our lives." Derrick Nesbitt, who worked with Bailey on a local television show called "Soul Beat" that Bailey hosted, said, "For him to be murdered was ridiculous" and still recalls coming to the murder scene and "watching him laying there."

Nesbitt, who thanked Bailey for helping him get into the news business, said, "I miss Chauncey and his type of reporting.

In Oakland, Chauncey hasn't been replaced." Jurors, who deliberated for 10 days, convicted Bey of three counts of first-degree murder for a shooting spree in the summer of 2007.

In addition to being convicted for the death of Bailey, Bey was convicted for the fatal shootings of Odell Roberson Jr., 31, on July 8, 2007, and Michael Wills, 36, on July 12, 2007.

Bakery associate Antoine Mackey, 25, was convicted of two counts of first-degree murder for the deaths of Bailey and Wills but jurors deadlocked on a murder charge he faced for the death of Roberson.

 

Feds Seize $14.8M from Swiss Bank of Counterfeit Software Merchant

Federal immigration officials have seized $14.8 million from a Swiss bank account of a fugitive entrepreneur accused of selling counterfeit security software over the Internet.

Shaileskumar Jain, 41, also known as Sam Jain, formerly of Mountain View, is charged in federal court in San Jose with fraudulently gaining millions of dollars from sales of counterfeit copies of anti-virus programs made by Symantec Corp.of Cupertino.

U.S. District Judge Ronald Whyte declared him a fugitive after he failed to show up for two court hearings in January 2009.

Jain is accused in a 2008 indictment of 31 counts of fraud and trafficking in counterfeit goods in 2003.

The indictment alleges that he took in a total of $13.5 million by selling counterfeit software through several Internet websites.

Jain allegedly recruited customers through a combination of email spamming and pop-up advertising that sent viewers to his websites.

The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's Homeland Security Investigations agency announced Thursday that the $14.

8 million was seized in a related forfeiture action. The agency said the forfeiture was completed May 31 after the Swiss government transferred the money to the U.S. Treasury in compliance with a seizure warrant issued in federal court in New York.

Joseph Vincent, assistant special agent in charge of the agency's San Jose office, said the amount seized includes the $13.5 million cited in the indictment.

Authorities are awaiting an accounting from the Swiss government as to the source of the remaining $1.3 million taken from the Swiss account, he said.

ICE Director John Morton, in a statement from his Washington, D.C., office, said authorities hope some of Jain's "ill-gotten gains will soon go to compensate the legitimate software maker that lost millions as a result of this scheme."

In the meantime, he said, "We're continuing our efforts to locate this fugitive so he can be brought to justice for his crimes."

Vincent said investigators are following up on information indicating Jain may have fled to Ukraine.

 

CPUC Panel Blasts PG&E

An independent panel appointed by the California Public Utilities Commission issued a report Thursday blasting PG&E's technical competence and pipeline integrity management procedures.

The panel found that shortcomings in those and other areas not only contributed to last year's San Bruno pipeline explosion, which left eight people dead and 35 homes destroyed, but they also have led to a flawed response to the disaster.

"We met many capable people," at PG&E, business advisor and panelist Paula Rosput Reynolds told the CPUC Thursday."

Somehow that has not created an atmosphere where inquiry, thinking and curiosity mesh together in a way that is fulsome." 

She and the other four members of the panel found that PG&E's pipeline integrity management program had focused more on worker safety than the safety of the system.

The company's record keeping, organizational effectiveness, and resource allocation also came under fire, as did its response to the San Bruno explosion, the five-stage "Pipeline 2020" improvement program.

"Pipeline 2020 is not a plan," Reynolds said, calling the materials "reactive" and underdeveloped.

PG&E released a statement saying the company "strongly agrees" with the panelist's comments and will work with the CPUC to improve its pipeline safety.

"It's clear, as we've openly acknowledged, that we need to make major improvements in our operations and culture in order to deliver the performance our customers rightly expect -- and that we expect from ourselves," the company said.

Although the National Transportation Safety Board is responsible for identifying the root causes of the explosion, the independent panel found that it could not separate technical incompetence from the problems it identified with PG&E's safety record, according to the 204-page report.

 

Milpitas Police Investigating Thursday's Shooting

Milpitas police are investigating a shooting at an occupied house Thursday afternoon.

Officers responded around 1:45 p.m. to a report of shots fired in the 600 block of North Abbott Avenue, according to police Lt.Thomas Borck.

Witnesses told police the suspect, who hasn't been identified, fled in a black mid-size sedan.

People were inside the house at the time, but no one was injured, Borck said.

 

Preliminary Investigation Concludes Pedestrian Killed by Clatrain was a Man

A pedestrian who was fatally struck on a Caltrain track in Burlingame Thursday afternoon was a man, an agency spokeswoman said.

A preliminary investigation indicates the death was intentional, Caltrain spokeswoman Christine Dunn said.

The man's name has not been released.

Caltrain reopened its northbound track near Bellevue Avenue at 5:45 p.m. for trains traveling at reduced speeds, Dunn said.

Commuters were advised to expect significant delays because of the service interruptions.

San Francisco Giants fans planning to take the train to Thursday night's game were warned to make other arrangements, she said.

This is the second time in two days a person has been fatally struck by a train in Burlingame.

The southbound Baby Bullet train No.

362 hit the man Thursday at about 4:30 p.m. near Bellevue Avenue, Dunn said.

On Wednesday, a man was struck at Peninsula Avenue at about 12:20 p.m., about half a mile from where the pedestrian was hit Thursday.

It appears Wednesday's death was a suicide, Dunn said.

Thursday's death marks the ninth person to be killed on Caltrain right-of-way this year.

There were 11 fatalities on Caltrain tracks last year.

BART and the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority were honoring Caltrain tickets.

 

SJ Hairstylist Killer Convicted of First-Degree Murder

Nearly 23 years after a 21-year-old hairstylist was found stabbed to death in her San Jose apartment, a jury Thursday found the suspect in the case guilty of first-degree murder for the killing.

Following a month-long trial and nearly 1.5 days of deliberation, a jury of eight men and four women convicted Charles Grant of stabbing Kristi Harris with a knife in her Bascom Avenue apartment Aug. 29, 1988.

Immediately after the verdict was read around 11 a.m., Harris' family members and friends broke into loud sobs.

"We've waited 23 years for this," Harris' sister, Dana, said.

"He took a precious life from us in a very brutal manner. I've always wanted him to feel the fear that she did."

Outside the courtroom, wearing a purple ribbon emblazoned with "J4K" or "Justice for Kristi," Harris' mother, Sharon, said she was at a loss for words.

"I'm just glad it's over with. It's taken way too long," she said.

Prosecutors said Grant killed her when she walked in on him during a robbery.

Her roommate later found her body in her apartment.

Grant was treated at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center for a laceration to his left hand on the day of the murder.

His wound required sutures and he also had a cast that was wet and damaged and required repair during the visit.

Homicide investigators interviewed Grant a few times after the murder and he provided a blood sample.

Police arrested Grant in August 2008 after his DNA was matched to DNA evidence taken from the apartment.

Santa Clara County Superior Court Judge David Cena ordered Grant to return to court for sentencing Sept. 8.

He faces a maximum sentence of 31 years to life in prison.

 

San Mateo Peninsula Humane Society Holds Largest Cat

Murphy stands out among the hundred other cats up for adoption at the San Mateo Peninsula Humane Society, the adoption center vice president said.

The 6-year-old male house cat was dropped off to the Peninsula Humane Society last month weighing 31.14 pounds -- the largest domestic cat the humane society workers have seen in 20 years, Peninsula Humane Society Vice President Scott Delucchi said.

"I've never seen a cat his size," Delucchi said.

With a cat this large, the society needs to monitor his food intake, diet and exercise, Delucchi said.

His future owners will also need to be aware that the cat's extra weight puts him at higher risk for disease and health problems.

Murphy's previous owner didn't intentionally let the cat become obese, it was "something that slowly crept up," Delucchi said about the owner who surrendered Murphy to the shelter at the end of May.

Delucchi said he thinks Murphy's size will attract attention and hopefully a family to take him to a good home.

"He's different, people like different," he said.

"Especially in a shelter with almost 100 cats up for adoption he really stands out."

The Coast Guard, Oakland police and other local agencies worked to remove a car dumped in the Oakland Estuary on Thursday, a Coast Guard spokeswoman said.

Oakland police have taken over the case, but the Coast Guard, along with the Alameda County Sheriff's Office and the Oakland Fire Department headed to the estuary, which separates Oakland and Alameda, after a 3 a.m. phone call of car lights shining through the water, Petty Officer Laura Alcon said.

Police determined the car was stolen and had been dumped into the water near the Jack London Aquatic Center, Alcon said, noting police say the area is known for ditching stolen cars.

Nobody was in the car, but the Coast Guard stayed at the extrication to ensure no one was hurt, Alcon said.

Once the car was lifted from the water a tow truck took it away, she said.

 

Child Molester Arrested in San Jose

A man suspected of severely abusing his ex-girlfriend's 3-year-old daughter in Campbell has been arrested in San Jose, according to police.

Tips led officers to the area of Santa Teresa Boulevard and Springer Way in San Jose on Wednesday.

At about 1:35 p.m., they found George Rodriguez, 35, sitting in the passenger seat of a car and arrested him on a $125,000 warrant for child abuse and false imprisonment, according to police Capt. Charley Adams.

Last month, Rodriguez's 15-year-old son found the girl rolled up in a carpet in Rodriguez's garage at his Campbell home in the 1300 block of Pollard Road.

The child is now in protective custody.

Her mother, Jane Marin, 31, was arrested on suspicion of child endangerment, Adams said.

Detectives had searched for Rodriguez in San Jose and Sacramento based on tips and leads.

The Sacramento Police Department and sheriff's office were also involved in the search.

 

New Health and Low-Income Housing Complex Opens in SOMA

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee joined city and federal officials Thursday to celebrate the opening of a new health center and low-income housing complex in the city's South of Market neighborhood.

The Westbrook Plaza complex, located at 227 Seventh St. between Folsom and Howard streets, includes a 20,000-square-foot community health clinic and 49 apartment units for rent to low-income families.

At a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the building, Lee and others cited the project as a reason why local redevelopment agencies should not be cut by Gov. Jerry Brown.

Brown has proposed eliminating the agencies, which use money to revitalize blighted urban areas, to help reduce the state's budget deficit.

Lee said more than a third of the funding for the $47 million Westbrook Plaza project came from the city's redevelopment agency.

Other speakers included officials from U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein's office and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, as well as the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency.

Fred Blackwell, executive director of the agency, said the project is "a shining example of what redevelopment can do, and a reason it should stick around.

" The health clinic includes space for medical exams, dental and lab work, X-rays and a public pharmacy, according to project officials.

The apartments include 1-, 2- and 3-bedroom units, community rooms and open space for households below 60 percent of the area's median income, which is $67,860 for a family of four.

The complex was jointly developed by the South of Market Health Center and Mercy Housing California, and is named after Eloise Westbrook, a housing and health care activist.

Lee said the collaboration on the project shows "we will take care of the most needy and we'll do it the right way, together."

 

Publishers Challenge Constitutionality of SF Yellow Pages Ban

A constitutional challenge to San Francisco's so-called Yellow Pages law claims the ordinance "harms the neediest city residents most of all."

The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in San Francisco late Tuesday, alleges the law will hurt San Francisco's "poorest, oldest and least English-proficient" residents.

It was filed by the New Jersey-based Local Search Association, formerly known as the Yellow Pages Association, a trade group of publishers of print and electronic commercial search directories.

The suit is slated for a case management hearing before U.S. Magistrate Elizabeth Laporte on Sept. 20.

The law, passed by the Board of Supervisors and signed by Mayor Ed Lee last month, will restrict the distribution of Yellow Pages phone books in the city.

Under a three-year pilot program scheduled to go into effect next year, distributors of printed commercial telephone directories will be prohibited from leaving the books on doorsteps unless residents agree in advance or in person to accept them.

The lawsuit charges that the measure will hurt vulnerable low-income and elderly people who may not have access to the Internet and who depend on the Yellow Pages when they urgently need services such as medical aid, emergency repairs, a lawyer or a funeral home.

The suit also claims the ordinance violates two federal and state constitutional rights of the publishers: the First Amendment right of free speech and the 14th Amendment right of equal treatment under the law.

It charges that Yellow Pages publishers are unfairly singled out for the ban while publishers of advertising circulars are not prohibited from distributing their materials.

The law, proposed by Board of Supervisors President David Chiu, is intended to cut down on blight and the costs of recycling unwanted phone books.

 

Castro Community Debates Whether to Hold Meeting About Rainbow Flag

The iconic rainbow flag that flies over the Castro in San Francisco was the Thursday night's Castro/Upper Market Community Benefit District meeting as the board decides whether to ask the Department of Public Works to convene a meeting on the flag.

Concern over who controls the flag came to a head in March when community members requested that the flag operators, the Merchants of Upper Market and Castro, lower the flag to mark the death of gay icon and actress Elizabeth Taylor, Castro Benefit District executive director Andrea Aiello said.

MUMC denied the request, the group's president Steve Adams said.

The group receives up to 10 requests each month to lower the flag for various reasons, and the board has to limit the number of lowerings.

"For us, the flag is a source of pride. People want it up as much as possible," Adams said.

For the past 12 years, the Merchants of Upper Market and Castro have had control of the flag, located at the corner of Market and Castro streets, Adams said.

The flagpole is on city land, but the merchants' association funds the insurance and upkeep of the rainbow flag in a "public-private partnership," which Adams considers of benefit to the city's Department of Public Works.

A DPW spokeswoman said the city maintains the area and landscaping around the flag, but has an agreement with MUMC that it is responsible for the flag and pole.

 

Teen Injured in Horseback Riding Accident Reunited with Pony

A Martinez teenager who was in a coma for 14 months after suffering a brain injury in a horseback riding accident has been reunited with the Shetland pony she cared for as a child.

Allison Angove, 18, cared for Blackie when she was about 12 years old.

Her mother said she hopes the miniature horse will help Angove heal as she prepares to come home from her care center in Walnut Creek at the end of the summer.

The Shetland pony was brought to Angove through the SonRise Equestrian Foundation, Executive Director Alana Koski said.

The foundation is a Danville-based nonprofit organization that arranges miniature horses to visit children who are terminally ill, autistic, at-risk, or recovering from injury to create a loving connection between the two, Koski said.

When Angove's mother contacted the organization to arrange a visit, they discovered Angove had previously cared for one of the horses, she said.

Angove was comatose until May 2010 after she suffered injuries during a warm-up for a show jumping event in Fresno in 2009, family friend Jackie Mann said.

She was 16 years old when her horse Skylar slipped and fell, throwing Angove off.

Although she was wearing a helmet, she suffered serious brain trauma, Mann said.

 

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Thousands Expected To Attend Funeral Service For Two Fallen Firefighters

Firefighters from around the state will converge on San Francisco on Friday to attend the funeral service for two firemen who died after fighting a blaze in the city's Diamond Heights neighborhood last week.

Fire department spokeswoman Mindy Talmadge said today that at least 6,000 people are expected to attend the services for Lt. Vincent Perez, 48, and firefighter-paramedic Anthony Valerio, 53.

The pair died of injuries they suffered while battling a fire at a home at 133 Berkeley Way on June 2.

Perez died later that day and Valerio succumbed to his injuries on Saturday morning.

A vigil will be held for the two men at 7 p.m. today at St. Mary's Cathedral at 1111 Gough St., and a joint funeral is planned for 12:30 p.m. Friday, also at St. Mary's.

After the funeral, the men will be buried at the Holy Cross Cemetery in Colma.

Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White, Mayor Ed Lee, and Bill Storti, the captain of Fire Station 26 where the two men worked, will be among the speakers at the funeral, as will Perez's brother and one of Valerio's longtime ambulance partners, according to Talmadge.

The funeral is expected to bring firefighters from as far south as Los Angeles and Long Beach, as well as members of dozens of fire departments in the Bay Area and elsewhere in Northern California, Talmadge said.

"The fire department is overwhelmed with the love and support that we've been receiving from our brothers and sisters in the fire service and the public," she said.

"Everyone has just been amazingly gracious." Perez and Valerio were badly burned when objects in a room of the house apparently heated to the point of ignition, a dangerous phenomenon known as a "flashover," Talmadge said.

A female firefighter suffered smoke inhalation and minor burns. She was treated at the hospital and released later that day.

Talmadge said the initial fire that day appears to have been sparked by something electrical, but its exact cause remains under investigation.

The Police Department today released details about street closures planned from about 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Friday to make way for the funeral and procession to the cemetery.

Westbound Geary Boulevard will be closed from Gough Street to Webster Street, and eastbound lanes will be shut down from Divisadero Street to Gough Street.

Northbound Webster Street will be blocked from Geary Boulevard to Ellis Street, and there will be partial lane closures on Gough Street between Geary Boulevard and Ellis Street.

After the funeral, a procession more than 200 fire trucks will travel south on Gough Street, then head west on Market Street, south on Valencia Street, west on 15th Street, south on Dolores Street and merge onto San Jose Avenue, police said.

From San Jose Avenue, the procession will enter southbound Interstate Highway 280 and exit at Serramonte Boulevard, then turn onto Collins Road, then head onto El Camino Real where it will end at the cemetery.

Several San Francisco Municipal Railway bus and light-rail lines are expected to be impacted, including the F-Market, J-Church, 5-Fulton, 6-Parnassus, 21-Hayes, 22-Fillmore, 24-Divisadero, 31-Balboa, 33-Stanyan, 48-Quintara, 38/38L-Geary, and 71/71L-Haight-Noriega.

The San Francisco firefighters' union has established trust accounts for the Perez and Valerio families at the San Francisco Fire Credit Union.

Donations can be sent to the credit union at 3201 California St., San Francisco, 94118.

Condolence messages can be sent to Fire Station 26, 80 Digby St., San Francisco, 94131.

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BART Delays Reported After Passenger Becomes Ill At Rockridge Station

BART riders should expect 15-minute delays this morning for trains on the Pittsburg-Bay Point line heading into San Francisco, a BART employee said.

The delays began after an ill passenger had to get off a train at the Rockridge station sometime before 10:45 a.m., the employee said.

The passenger's medical needs have been taken care of, she said.

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Man Hit In Head With Baseball Bat, Robbed Of Wristwatch

A man was hit in the head with a baseball bat and had his wristwatch stolen in San Francisco's South of Market neighborhood on Wednesday night, police said.

The robbery was reported at about 10:40 p.m. near the intersection of Fourth and Bryant streets.

The 32-year-old victim was approached by a man who hit him in the head with a baseball bat, knocking him to the ground, according to police.

While he was on the ground, the attacker took the man's wristwatch and fled.

He had not been found as of this morning, police said.

The victim was taken to San Francisco General Hospital to be treated for his injuries, which are not considered life-threatening.

Anyone with information about the attack is encouraged to call the Police Department's anonymous tip line at (415) 575-4444 or send a tip by text message to TIP411.

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Lawsuit Claims City's Yellow Pages Law Will Hurt Neediest Residents

A constitutional challenge to San Francisco's so-called Yellow Pages law claims the ordinance "harms the neediest city residents most of all."

The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in San Francisco late Tuesday, alleges the law will hurt San Francisco's "poorest, oldest and least English-proficient" residents.

It was filed by the New Jersey-based Local Search Association, formerly known as the Yellow Pages Association, a trade group of publishers of print and electronic commercial search directories.

The suit is slated for a case management hearing before U.S. Magistrate Elizabeth Laporte on Sept. 20.

The law, passed by the Board of Supervisors and signed by Mayor Ed Lee last month, will restrict the distribution of Yellow Pages phone books in the city.

Under a three-year pilot program scheduled to go into effect next year, distributors of printed commercial telephone directories will be prohibited from leaving the books on doorsteps unless residents agree in advance or in person to accept them.

The lawsuit charges that the measure will hurt vulnerable low-income and elderly people who may not have access to the Internet and who depend on the Yellow Pages when they urgently need services such as medical aid, emergency repairs, a lawyer or a funeral home.

The suit also claims the ordinance violates two federal and state constitutional rights of the publishers: the First Amendment right of free speech and the 14th Amendment right of equal treatment under the law.

It charges that Yellow Pages publishers are unfairly singled out for the ban while publishers of advertising circulars are not prohibited from distributing their materials.

The law, proposed by Board of Supervisors President David Chiu, is intended to cut down on blight and the costs of recycling unwanted phone books. Chiu said, "I am confident San Francisco's new law will stand up to court scrutiny."

"We carefully crafted the legislation to address the significant environmental harm and blight caused by mass over-distribution of yellow pages while still allowing for them to get into the hands of all who want them," the supervisor said.

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Mayor Disappointed About Muni Operators' Rejection Of Agreement

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee said today he is disappointed that a tentative agreement reached by the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency and its transit operators' union was rejected Wednesday by the union's members.

Members of Transport Workers Union Local 250-A voted overwhelmingly against ratifying the agreement, which had been signed last week by SFMTA management and union representatives. The vote was 944 to 488.

"Obviously we feel disappointed because there has been a genuine effort to have our transit workers understand the needs of the agency," Lee said.

The agreement came after three months of bargaining between the SFMTA and the union and would have saved the agency a minimum of $21 million over the course of the three-year contract, SFMTA spokesman Charlie Goodyear said.

In accordance with Proposition G -- passed by the city's voters last November -- an arbitrator is now responsible for the contract and will have to decide between each side's final offers on outstanding issues.

The decision of the arbitrator, who began meeting with the two sides this afternoon, is final and binding.

The SFMTA said it expects a decision before the Tuesday deadline. Lee said he would not get involved in the proceedings unless necessary after the arbitration process, but said he hopes the union comes around in the negotiations.

"The ultimate thing I need to keep impressing on the drivers is ... our bosses are the residents of the city of San Francisco," he said. "We need to respect that and understand our jobs are there to serve the public."

The union leadership put out a statement Wednesday following the announcement that operators had voted down the agreement, blaming the SFMTA and its spokesman Goodyear for "a public -- and inaccurate -- release of alleged terms and conditions in the agreement."

TWU Local 250-A President Rafael Cabrera said in the statement, "The actions by management's spokesman created a sense of mistrust and confusion that was hard to overcome.

We specifically agreed that neither side would make public statements about the tentative agreement until we had a chance to present it to our members."

Goodyear said today, "It was certainly not our intention to prevent in any way the ability of union leadership to go out and talk to their members," and said the union had five or six days to do so before any statements were released to the press.

"We disagree with the premise that our statement is responsible for yesterday's vote," he said.

The union has voted to authorize a strike in case negotiations break down, and is also seeking to overturn Proposition G.

The proposition changed parts of the city charter that ensured that Muni drivers would have the second-highest operator salaries in the country, and it requires that contracts be negotiated through collective bargaining and binding arbitration, similarly to other city employees.

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Lawsuit Claims San Francisco's Yellow Pages Law Will Hurt Neediest Residents

A constitutional challenge to San Francisco's so-called Yellow Pages law claims the ordinance "harms the neediest city residents most of all."

The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in San Francisco late Tuesday, alleges the law will hurt San Francisco's "poorest, oldest and least English-proficient" residents.

It was filed by the New Jersey-based Local Search Association, formerly known as the Yellow Pages Association, a trade group of publishers of print and electronic commercial search directories. The suit is slated for a case management hearing before U.S. Magistrate Elizabeth Laporte on Sept. 20.

The law, passed by the Board of Supervisors and signed by Mayor Ed Lee last month, will restrict the distribution of Yellow Pages phone books in the city.

Under a three-year pilot program scheduled to go into effect next year, distributors of printed commercial telephone directories will be prohibited from leaving the books on doorsteps unless residents agree in advance or in person to accept them.

The lawsuit charges that the measure will hurt vulnerable low-income and elderly people who may not have access to the Internet and who depend on the Yellow Pages when they urgently need services such as medical aid, emergency repairs, a lawyer or a funeral home.

The suit also claims the ordinance violates two federal and state constitutional rights of the publishers: the First Amendment right of free speech and the 14th Amendment right of equal treatment under the law.

It charges that Yellow Pages publishers are unfairly singled out for the ban while publishers of advertising circulars are not prohibited from distributing their materials.

The law, proposed by Board of Supervisors President David Chiu, is intended to cut down on blight and the costs of recycling unwanted phone books.

Chiu said, "I am confident San Francisco's new law will stand up to court scrutiny."

"We carefully crafted the legislation to address the significant environmental harm and blight caused by mass over-distribution of yellow pages while still allowing for them to get into the hands of all who want them," the supervisor said.
   
CONTACT: Chiu spokesman Judson True (415) 554-7451, Local Search Association spokeswoman Sophia Hitti (212) 453-2159 

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San Francisco Bay Area Thursday News Roundup

Muni Operators Reject Contract Agreement, Arbitrator To Make Final Decision

A tentative agreement between the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency and its transit operators' union was voted down by union members, according to voting results released by the SFMTA Wednesday night.

Union members rejected the agreement, which had been signed by union representatives and SFMTA management, by a 944-488 vote. Union leadership had made a yes-vote recommendation.

The agreement comes after three months of bargaining between the SFMTA and Transport Workers Union Local 250-A, and would have saved the agency a minimum of $38 million in labor costs over the course of the three-year contract, according to the SFMTA.

"From the beginning, SFMTA focused on negotiating a contract that would permit management to run a safe, efficient and reliable transit operation," SFMTA Board of Directors Chair Tom Nolan said in a statement Wednesday night.

In accordance with Proposition G -- passed by city voters last November -- an arbitrator is now responsible for the contract and will have to decide between each side's final offers on outstanding issues.

The arbitrator's decision is final and binding, and the SFMTA said that it expects a decision before Tuesday, the latest date the proposed contract could be submitted in compliance with sunshine laws.

The new contract will take effect on July 1, the beginning of the fiscal year.

Among the provisions in the rejected proposal were a pay freeze for operators, the ability for the agency to hire about 200 part-time workers, and several changes to work rules, including overtime and discipline procedures, according to the SFMTA.

The union represents the roughly 2,200 operators of Muni's buses and light-rail vehicles.

Debra Johnson, SFMTA's lead negotiator and director of administration, said that the agency aims to achieve a contract that will make Muni more efficient in years to come. "Ultimately, we believe an arbitrator will preserve most of what we negotiated at the bargaining table," Johnson said.

 

PG&E Admits to Repairing San Burno Pipeline in 1988

PG&E has informed federal investigators that repairs were made in 1988 on the same gas transmission pipeline that exploded in San Bruno in September.

National Transportation Safety Board Chairwoman Deborah Hersman said Wednesday that PG&E recently admitted to repairing a leak on the pipeline about 9 miles south of San Bruno 23 years ago.

Hersman said that the information was provided to the NTSB in the last month and that she did not know why PG&E did not disclose it earlier.

"We certainly would have expected to receive that information sooner," Hersman said.

A spokesman for PG&E said Wednesday afternoon that utility employees have been poring over millions of historical records and documents to provide to NTSB investigators, and that information about the leak on Line 132 was handed over as soon as it was uncovered on May 20.

"We've acknowledged several times since the tragedy that our operations and recordkeeping practices aren't where they should be," PG&E spokesman Brian Swanson said. Swanson said the information about the leak was found in a document uncovered at a local office. "

We know it was a small leak," he said. "It was discovered in 1988 as part of our annual routine gas survey."

A 12-foot section of Line 132 was cut out and replaced to repair the leak, which only released trace amounts of gas, Swanson said.

Hersman spoke at a news conference Wednesday morning in the Crestmoor Canyon neighborhood where Line 132 ruptured, causing an explosion that killed eight people and destroyed dozens of homes.

She was joined by Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo. Hersman met privately with survivors before touring the disaster site and called her first visit to the area "sobering."

The chairwoman, who was accompanied by NTSB member Mark Rosekind, said the agency has placed the San Bruno investigation on the fast track before all other pipeline incident investigations.

"The goal for our agency is to complete this report as soon as possible," Hersman said.

 

Ting Announces Additional $50M In Tax Revenue Created By His Office

San Francisco Assessor-Recorder Phil Ting announced Wednesday that his office generated an additional $50 million in property tax revenue above expectations, helping the city close a large budget deficit for the coming fiscal year.

Ting's office is expected to generate about $97 million in supplemental and escape property taxes by the end of the fiscal year on June 30, far above the $47 million that was initially forecasted.

The taxes are in addition to a regular tax bill and reflect the difference between the prior assessed value of a property and a new assessment, according to Ting's office.

The additional revenues were included as part of the proposed budget Mayor Ed Lee presented to the Board of Supervisors last week to close a $306 million budget deficit for the next fiscal year.

"San Franciscans and our City Hall leadership is dealing with an extremely difficult budget, so I am very pleased our office is helping locate every dollar of revenue the city can use to pay for essential services and programs," Ting said in a statement.

Ting, a candidate in San Francisco's mayoral race this November, made Wednesday's announcement at a news conference outside City Hall, where he was joined by education, labor and community leaders who he said will be helped by the additional revenue for the city.

By the end of July, Lee's proposed $6.83 billion budget has to be approved by the Board of Supervisors, which can also make changes to it.

 

Apple to Build New Campus in Cupertino 

Cupertino Mayor Gilbert Wong reacted enthusiastically Wednesday to Apple CEO Steve Jobs' announcement on Tuesday night of his plans to build a 3.1-million-square-foot campus in the city.

"This is a huge shot in the arm for us," Wong told reporters at a news conference Wednesday morning. "While other cities are struggling, we can grow."

Wearing his trademark black turtleneck and blue jeans, Jobs presented his proposal for a new Apple campus in a surprise appearance at Tuesday night's city council meeting.

"We've come up with a design that puts 12,000 people in one building," Jobs told the city council. "It's a pretty amazing building. It's a little like a spaceship landed."

The new facility would be built on nearly 150 acres of land Apple purchased from Hewlett Packard.

The space is currently mostly asphalt with some landscaping, which Jobs said he wanted to increase by doubling the trees on the property.

Jobs envisioned curved four-story building with a parking garage underneath and a courtyard in the middle.

Amenities would include an on-site energy center, auditorium, cafeteria, and fitness center.

Groundbreaking for the new campus would take place next year with a scheduled opening in 2015.

Apple is the largest employer in Cupertino.

Roughly 2,800 people work in the main campus while the remaining 12,000 work in rented buildings throughout the city.

Jobs originally announced the plan to build a new campus in April 2006. "Apple's grown like a weed," Jobs said. "We need the building we've got, but we need another one to augment it."

 

Public Outraged at Alameda Police for Inaction in Crown Beach Drowning

The Alameda Police Department Wednesday released 911 calls and a timeline of events surrounding the death of a man who intentionally drowned at Crown Beach on Memorial Day while rescuers watched from the shore for almost an hour, prompting outrage from the public.

"He's trying to drown himself," 53-year-old Raymond Zack's elderly mother told a 911 dispatcher in the calls released Wednesday. "Hurry up, he's way out there. He doesn't swim. Please hurry."

Zack had waded about 150 yards into the water near the 2100 block of Shoreline Drive.

He had tried to commit suicide before, his mother, Dolores Berry, told the dispatcher at 11:33 a.m.

Emergency responders arrived on scene just minutes later, but they watched from the beach as Zack eventually lost consciousness and was brought to shore by a good Samaritan, according to the police transcript.

Zack later died at a local hospital.

Fire department protocol prohibited rescuers from going into the water because their water-rescue certification had lapsed, the fire department's acting deputy chief of operations, Daren Olson, said the day after the drowning.

According to the transcript, police contacted the U.S. Coast Guard at 11:32 a.m., two minutes after the first call was made to 911, to request a rescue boat and helicopter for Zack.

The Coast Guard said its crews were about 40 minutes out, so the Alameda Police Department contacted the sheriff's office, Oakland Police Department, and Alameda County Fire Department in search of a closer boat.

None of the agencies could offer faster assistance, according to the transcript.

The day after the drowning, the fire department changed its policy so rescue swimmers could be sent into the water at the discretion of the incident commander on scene, acting city manager Lisa Goldman said at Tuesday's City Council meeting.

The department has 30 volunteers scheduled for rescue swimmer training, including 16 who will begin the certification process next week, she said.

The city will also conduct an independent review and is compiling documents relevant to the incident, Mayor Marie Gilmore said at the meeting.

The materials will include transcripts, timelines and department memos regarding water-rescue training.

 

Oakland Parents Raise Funds After School Safe Stolen

Burglars who stole a safe from the principal's office at an East Oakland elementary school over the weekend messed with the wrong students, according to a group of parents preparing to fight back.

The safe at Grass Valley Elementary School, one of two schools targeted over the weekend, contained about $800 when it was pulled from its foundation on either Saturday night or Sunday, Oakland Unified School District spokesman Troy Flint said.

A cache of electronics was also taken from Redwoods Heights Elementary School, at 4401 39th Ave., which is missing computers, projection systems and other devices, Flint said.

No suspects have been arrested in either case, and it was not yet clear if the burglaries were related.

Some of the money taken from Grass Valley had been raised by parent volunteers, who are handing out flyers and holding a community meeting to prevent any future thefts at the school, Oakland Unified employee and Grass Valley parent Robin Moore said.

"We are appalled that someone came in to our school and stole from our children," said Moore, whose son is in the first grade. "The school doesn't have any money whatsoever, the district doesn't have any money. So we fundraise."

The parents have spent countless hours organizing concession stands, raffles, dinners, yard sales and other fundraisers, she said.

They cook for school events such as PTA meetings and Black History Month, and try to make sure the roughly 285 students at Grass Valley get to participate in field trips and other social events.

"We value each other, and teach our kids to value and respect themselves and others," Moore said. "We're pissed."

Flint said break-ins are a recurring problem for Oakland Unified, although not necessarily at Redwood Heights or Grass Valley.

The weekend theft was the first Moore knows of at Grass Valley, she said, but parents are acting now to "nip it in the bud."

 

Stabbing Victim Found in Storage Unit Identified

The San Mateo County coroner's office has identified the body of a man who was found stabbed to death at a San Mateo storage facility Tuesday as that of 33-year-old Pacifica resident Justin Lockwood.

Lockwood's body was found at about 1:30 p.m. on the property of All American Self Storage at 2000 E. Third Ave., at Detroit Drive.

Police established a crime scene perimeter and spent Tuesday afternoon and night combing the storage facility for evidence, interviewing potential witnesses, and launching a search for information to reconstruct the events that led to the homicide.

As of Wednesday night, detectives had not yet identified a suspect in the homicide.

 

Body Found Near UCSC

The body of a 25-year-old man was found Wednesday morning near the University of California at Santa Cruz campus, according to the California Highway Patrol.

The man was found by a passing bicyclist around 8 a.m. on Empire Grade Road south of Heller Drive, according to the CHP.

It appears the man was hit by a vehicle as he was riding his bicycle and that the vehicle's driver fled afterward, the CHP said.

The man is a resident of Santa Cruz, but his name is being withheld pending notification of his family.

The vehicle that struck him was either a maroon or metallic burgundy-colored Nissan or Infinity that has sustained some damage, according to the CHP.

The CHP is investigating the hit-and-run collision and asks any witnesses or anyone with information to call (831) 662-0511.

 

Arson Suspected in Wednesday's Fires

Two fires that broke out simultaneously at homes a block away from each other in the Berkeley hills early Wednesday morning may have been caused by arson but there is no definitive proof at this time, Berkeley Fire Chief Debra Pryor said.

Pryor said fire crews first responded to a report of a fire at a home at 548 Cragmont Ave. at 12:43 a.m.

A firefighter on his way to that house noticed a second blaze at 494 Cragmont Ave. and diverted to that house, she said.

At 548 Cragmont Ave., a vehicle that was parked in the driveway apparently ignited and the blaze then transferred to an outside building -- a combination of a garage and storage area -- but did not transfer to the house, Pryor said.

The fire was soon brought under control and no one was injured, she said.

Pryor said the cause of the blaze has not been determined and "arson hasn't been ruled out."

However, she said there is no firm evidence of arson, as no ignition sources have been found.

Pryor said the fire at 494 Cragmont Ave. was small and was confined to an area outside the house and that the firefighter who diverted to that blaze was able to put it out quickly with a fire extinguisher.

She said at this time fire officials "are considering that it was a coincidence" that the two fires occurred at the same time a block away from each other but they are concerned just the same.

The residents of the two homes were evacuated temporarily while the fires were being extinguished, but they were allowed to go back into their homes after a short time because there was no fire or smoke damage to the homes, Pryor said.

She said damage estimates for either fire were not yet available.

 

Man Killed on 101 in Palo Alto Identified

A man who was struck and killed on southbound U.S. Highway 101 in Palo Alto early Wednesday morning has been identified by the Santa Clara County medical examiner's office as 63-year-old Sidney Brown.

Brown, a resident of South San Francisco, was either standing or attempting to cross the freeway near Oregon Expressway when at about 2:50 a.m. a Honda Civic struck him in the No. 2 lane, according to California Highway Patrol Sgt. Paul McCarthy. McCarthy said the impact caused Brown to fly over the hood of the car, through the windshield and land in the passenger seat of the Civic.

He was pronounced dead at the scene.

The driver of the Civic, a 71-year-old San Jose man, suffered minor lacerations on his hand. He was not cited or arrested. Alcohol does not appear to be a factor in the collision, McCarthy said.

 

Parking Near Golden Gate Park Impacted Due to Sinkhole

Several parking spots along San Francisco's Golden Gate Park will be inaccessible for the next few weeks because of a water leak that caused a sinkhole about 10 feet in diameter on the north side of Lincoln Way, a public utilities spokeswoman said.

The leak, which occurred near Funston Avenue and Lincoln Way, probably started on Tuesday, but the city's dispatch center was not informed of it until about noon Wednesday, San Francisco Public Utilities Commission spokeswoman Suzanne Gautier said.

The leak damaged the parking lane on Lincoln Way near the intersection as well as the curb and a nearby light pole, she said.

Crews will probably need a few weeks to repair the damage, and the parking lane on the westbound side of Lincoln Way will be blocked off during that time, Gautier said. One lane of eastbound traffic was also blocked off for a couple of hours Wednesday while crews investigated the leak.

 

Sandwich Shop Robber Arrested in Pittsburg

A man suspected of robbing the Subway sandwich shop in San Rafael last month was arrested in Pittsburg Wednesday, police spokeswoman Margo Rohrbacher said.

The robbery suspect ordered two sandwiches at the eatery in the Marin Square Shopping Center on Bellam Boulevard around 4:45 p.m. on May 27, Rohrbacher said.

When the cashier rang up the sale, the robber pulled out a black semi-automatic handgun and demanded cash, Rohrbacher said.

The robber fled with two sandwiches, two soft drinks and cash.

The robbery was filmed on the store's surveillance camera and widely viewed on TV and the web, leading to valuable investigative leads, Rohrbacher said.

Police identified 43-year-old Arthur Luis Martinez as the suspect, Rohrbacher said.

The robbery victim identified him from a photo and an arrest warrant was issued, Rohrbacher said.

Detectives learned he was possibly in the East Bay and he was spotted eating lunch around 1 p.m. outside Carnitas Tijuana on Railroad Avenue in Pittsburg, Rohrbacher said.

San Rafael and Pittsburg police took Martinez into custody without incident and he was booked into Marin County Jail for armed robbery, Rohrbacher said.

Police and other law enforcement agencies are investigating whether Martinez was involved in other unsolved Bay Area robberies, Rohrbacher said.

MLB Legend Tommy Lasorda, Giants Players Past And Present To Participate In Cancer Research Fundraiser

Major league baseball legend Tommy Lasorda will be joining several San Francisco Giants players for a grilling competition today as part of a campaign to raise awareness and funds for prostate cancer research.

Giants team members past and present, including Aaron Rowand, Jeremy Affeldt, J.T. Snow and Shawon Dunston, will be competing to see who can grill the tastiest meal this afternoon as part of the Safeway Homerun Grill Off.

Lasorda will help to judge the competition, which organizers hope will raise awareness for a cancer that affects 1 in 6 men.

Representatives from Safeway, the Prostate Cancer Foundation, and the University of California at San Francisco will also attend the event to promote awareness as well as emphasize the importance of early detection.

Today's event will be held at the Safeway at 2300 16th St. at noon.

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Weather Forecast For The San Francisco Bay Area

The Bay Area is expected to be cloudy this morning with patchy fog, becoming partly cloudy with highs in the lower 60s to mid 70s.

It is expected to be partly cloudy this evening, becoming cloudy with patchy fog after midnight. Lows are expected to be in the upper 40s to mid 50s.

Friday is expected to be cloudy with patchy fog in the morning, becoming sunny, with highs in the lower 60s to mid 70s.

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Potrero Del Sol Mural Unveiled To Combat Graffiti With Art

A community that came together to solve the problem of persistent graffiti at a neighborhood park celebrated the unveiling of a mural painted in the hope of staving off vandalism.

Potrero del Sol Park, which is a favorite among skaters and schoolchildren, is bordered by Buena Vista Elementary School and a building maintained by San Francisco General Hospital.

Taggers constantly targeted a wall of the hospital building, according to the city's Recreation and Park Department.

After hospital painters' efforts to efface the wall were thwarted time and time again, the community rallied.

The school's PTA found the artist Victor Reyes to compose a mural, and the students competed in a naming contest.

The parks department waived the permit fee, the hospital donated paint and scaffolding and navigated the plan through the San Francisco Arts Commission.

The "Familia" mural, whose bright blocks of colors pop against the otherwise neutral surroundings, was unveiled at 10 a.m.

Wednesday at the park located at 25th and Utah streets.

According to the parks department, the mural is the story of "a shared problem and a creative solution."

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Ting Announces Additional $50M In Tax Revenue Created By His Office

San Francisco Assessor-Recorder Phil Ting announced today that his office generated an additional $50 million in property tax revenue above expectations, helping the city close a large budget deficit for the coming fiscal year.

Ting's office is expected to generate about $97 million in supplemental and escape property taxes by the end of the fiscal year on June 30, far above the $47 million that was initially forecasted.

The taxes are in addition to a regular tax bill and reflect the difference between the prior assessed value of a property and a new assessment, according to Ting's office.

The additional revenues were included as part of the proposed budget Mayor Ed Lee presented to the Board of Supervisors last week to close a $306 million budget deficit for the next fiscal year.

"San Franciscans and our City Hall leadership is dealing with an extremely difficult budget, so I am very pleased our office is helping locate every dollar of revenue the city can use to pay for essential services and programs," Ting said in a statement.

Ting, a candidate in San Francisco's mayoral race this November, made today's announcement at a news conference outside City Hall, where he was joined by education, labor and community leaders who he said will be helped by the additional revenue for the city.

By the end of July, Lee's proposed $6.83 billion budget has to be approved by the Board of Supervisors, which can also make changes to it.

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Muni Operators Reject Contract Agreement, Arbitrator To Make Final Decision

A tentative agreement between the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency and its transit operators' union was voted down by union members, according to voting results released by the SFMTA tonight.

Union members rejected the agreement, which had been signed by union representatives and SFMTA management, by a vote of 1,057 to 488.

Union leadership had made a yes-vote recommendation.

The agreement comes after three months of bargaining between the SFMTA and Transport Workers Union Local 250-A, and would have saved the agency a minimum of $38 million in labor costs over the course of the three-year contract, according to the SFMTA.

"From the beginning, SFMTA focused on negotiating a contract that would permit management to run a safe, efficient and reliable transit operation," SFMTA Board of Directors Chair Tom Nolan said in a statement tonight.

In accordance with Proposition G -- passed by city voters last November -- an arbitrator is now responsible for the contract and will have to decide between each side's final offers on outstanding issues.

The arbitrator's decision is final and binding, and the SFMTA said that it expects a decision before Tuesday, the latest date the proposed contract could be submitted in compliance with sunshine laws.

The new contract will take effect on July 1, the beginning of the fiscal year.

Among the provisions in the rejected proposal were a pay freeze for operators, the ability for the agency to hire about 200 part-time workers, and several changes to work rules, including overtime and discipline procedures, according to the SFMTA.

The union represents the roughly 2,200 operators of Muni's buses and light-rail vehicles.

Debra Johnson, SFMTA's lead negotiator and director of administration, said that the agency aims to achieve a contract that will make Muni more efficient in years to come. "Ultimately, we believe an arbitrator will preserve most of what we negotiated at the bargaining table," Johnson said.

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Water Leak Creates Sinkhole Along Lincoln Way

Several parking spots along San Francisco's Golden Gate Park will be inaccessible for the next few weeks because of a water leak that caused a sinkhole about 10 feet in diameter on the north side of Lincoln Way, a public utilities spokeswoman said.

The leak, which occurred near Funston Avenue and Lincoln Way, probably started on Tuesday, but the city's dispatch center was not informed of it until about noon today,

San Francisco Public Utilities Commission spokeswoman Suzanne Gautier said.

The leak damaged the parking lane on Lincoln Way near the intersection as well as the curb and a nearby light pole, she said.

Crews will probably need a few weeks to repair the damage, and the parking lane on the westbound side of Lincoln Way will be blocked off during that time, Gautier said.

One lane of eastbound traffic was also blocked off for a couple of hours today while crews investigated the leak.

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Update: FBI: Man Fatally Shot By Police Believed To Be 'Gen X Bandit'

A man fatally shot by San Francisco police after he allegedly tried to run them over near Buena Vista Park on Tuesday evening is believed to be the "Gen X Bandit" suspected of two bank robberies in Southern California last month, an FBI spokeswoman said today.

Joshua Smith, 25, was identified by the San Francisco medical examiner's office today as the man who was shot and killed by police at about 5:40 p.m. Tuesday in the first block of Buena Vista Avenue East, between Haight Street and Duboce Avenue.

Officers had gone to the area after being notified by the FBI that a stolen vehicle that was allegedly involved in two bank robberies in Irvine was tracked via GPS to San Francisco.

When the officers tried to pull over the vehicle and arrest the man, he allegedly attempted to run them over with the car.

The officers, fearing for their safety, opened fire on the man, striking him, police said.

The man, later identified as Smith, was taken to San Francisco General Hospital and died sometime before 7:45 p.m., police said.

FBI spokeswoman Laura Eimiller confirmed today that Smith is believed to be the "Gen X Bandit," who got the name after wearing a beanie and a flannel shirt while allegedly robbing the two banks in Irvine on May 17.

The robberies occurred about 30 minutes apart at a Chase bank and a Comerica bank.

No weapon was seen and no injuries were reported in either robbery, Irvine police Lt. Julia Engen said.

Shortly after the robberies, Orange County sheriff's deputies spotted a car at a gas station that matched the description of the one used in the robberies -- a gray two-door BMW 3 Series with dealer plates, sheriff's spokesman Jim Amormino said.

When the deputies tried to detain the driver, he took off at speeds as high as 110 mph, and the pursuit was dropped for safety reasons, Amormino said.

San Francisco police Sgt. Mike Andraychak said today that the vehicle involved in Tuesday night's confrontation with police matched that description.

The officers who were involved in the shooting have been put on paid administrative leave pending an investigation into the shooting, which is standard department procedure.

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Bicyclist Struck By Car After Running Red Light In SOMA

A bicyclist was injured when he ran a red light and was hit by a car at Sixth and Mission streets in San Francisco this afternoon, a police spokesman said.

The cyclist, a San Francisco resident who is about 45 years old, was riding south on Sixth Street when the collision occurred at about 1:50 p.m., police Sgt. Michael Andraychak said.

"He was described as traveling at a high rate of speed, swerving in and out of lanes," Andraychak said.

As he crossed Mission Street, allegedly running the red light, he was hit by an eastbound four-door gray Lexus driven by another San Francisco man in his 40s, Andraychak said.

The cyclist was taken to a hospital with injuries that were not life-threatening. He was not cited.

Although the driver does not appear to have been at fault for the collision, he was cited because he was driving on a suspended license, had false registration and did not have proof of insurance, Andraychak said.

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June 9, 2011

@MLNow: Good Morning Mission! Wed. June 8. Sell things, Boogaloos in the summer, and squished on BART. … More @MLNow: Did you ever wonder what happened to Day old Pastries at Tartine BAkery? ht… More @MLNow: SFPD Recap: Robbed on 16th and Mission http://ow.ly/5dlEY … More @MLNow: Cries of San Francisco http://ow.ly/5du2M … More @MLNow:...

June 8, 2011

Como Batman, el propietario de la librería adobe deambula de noche por las calles. A diferencia de Batman, él reparte quiche.

Today, a new mural was unveiled at Potrero del Sol Park. Sort of. “I thought Reyes’ work was so well done I had no idea it still wasn’t finished yet,” said Connie Chan, the San Francisco Recreation and Park Department’s deputy director of public affairs. “I know the mural isn’t 100 percent finished,” said Cathy Manshel,...

Paid for by Phil Ting for Assembly 2012. FPPC ID# 1343137