SF News

Suspected Bank Robber Fatally Shot By Police Identified

A suspected Southern California bank robber who was fatally shot by San Francisco police after he allegedly tried to run them over near the city's Buena Vista Park on Tuesday evening has been identified by the medical examiner's office as 25-year-old Joshua Smith.

Police were notified by the FBI that a stolen vehicle that was involved in an Irvine bank robbery and was being tracked through a GPS device was in San Francisco.

Officers went to the first block of Buena Vista Avenue East, located between Haight Street and Duboce Avenue, at about 5:40 p.m. to try to apprehend the suspect, police spokesman Lt. Troy Dangerfield said.

When the officers tried to pull over the vehicle and arrest the man, he allegedly attempted to run them over with the car.

The officers, fearing for their safety, opened fire on the man, striking him, police said.

The man, later identified as Smith, was taken to San Francisco General Hospital and died sometime before 7:45 p.m., police said.

Investigators believe Smith may be the "Gen X Bandit," suspected by the FBI of robbing two banks in Irvine on May 17.

Jim Amormino, spokesman for the Orange County Sheriff's Department, said that after the bank robberies, sheriff's deputies had spotted a car at a gas station matching the description of the one used in the bank robberies -- a gray two-door BMW 3 Series with dealer plates.

When the deputies tried to detain the driver, he took off at speeds as high as 110 mph, and the pursuit was dropped for safety reasons, Amormino said.

San Francisco police Sgt. Mike Andraychak said that the car involved in Tuesday night's confrontation near Buena Vista Park matched that description.

An FBI spokesperson was not immediately available this morning to confirm whether Smith was indeed the "Gen X Bandit."

CONTACT: San Francisco police (415) 553-1651 San Francisco medical examiner's office (415) 553-1694 FBI spokeswoman Laura Eimiller (310) 996-3343 Jim Amormino, Orange County Sheriff's Department (714) 904-7042

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Man Arrested After SOMA Carjacking Early This

A man in his 20s was arrested in connection with a carjacking in San Francisco's South of Market neighborhood early this morning, police said.

The carjacking was reported at about 2:30 a.m. near the intersection of First and Howard streets.

The suspect entered the victim's car, an Acura TL, and told the 26-year-old driver and his male passenger that he had a gun, according to police.

The victims drove the suspect around until he took out the gun and demanded money.

The victims then exited the car and flagged down officers as the suspect fled in the vehicle, police said.

The suspect was later arrested.

Police have not released his name. The victims were uninjured during the carjacking.

CONTACT: San Francisco police (415) 553-1651

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SF Supes Approve Lease Allowing SFMTA To Move Its Operations Center

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors on Tuesday approved a lease that will allow the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency to move its operations center to a new location on Market Street.

The SFMTA's command and control operations are currently housed in several facilities around the city, but in the agreement passed in a 7-4 vote by supervisors Tuesday, they will be consolidated in a building at 1455 Market St., between 10th and 11th streets.

The agency is expected to move into the space in June 2012 on a 10-year lease.

The new center will include the Operations Control Center, the central nervous system for San Francisco Municipal Railway that monitors the movement of buses and light-rail vehicles and detects any problems.

Supervisor Scott Wiener called the move "a mission-critical project for Muni," which he said has "had many, many problems with the subway system."

The SFMTA's long-term plan is to relocate the center to the new Transbay Terminal when it opens in 2017, but will determine when construction is complete whether to continue to use the Market Street site as its primary operations facility or convert it to a secondary site.

The board approved the plan even though its budget analyst, Harvey Rose, did not recommend it.

Rose's analysis of the plan found that the SFMTA will be occupying more than 52,000 square feet in the new space, an increase of more than 216 percent from the space it currently takes up.

Supervisor David Campos, one of the four dissenting votes, also questioned the length of the lease.

Jane Kim, Eric Mar and Ross Mirkarimi were the other supervisors to vote against it.

But board president David Chiu called it "a very important project" for San Francisco.

"We've all had our criticism of the MTA, but this is about the future of transportation management in our city," Chiu said.

CONTACT: Muni spokesman Paul Rose (415) 701-4582, (415) 601-1637 cellphone

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SF Supes Give Green Light To Put Bond Measure On Ballot

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to put a $248 million bond measure on the November ballot that would provide funding for pothole repair and street repavement.

The Road Repair and Street Safety Bond, announced by Mayor Ed Lee and several of the supervisors last month, would generate revenue for street repaving and reconstruction, as well as improvements in sidewalk accessibility, pedestrian and bicycle safety, and street signals.

The approval for putting the bond measure on the November ballot was passed by a 9-2 vote by the board Tuesday afternoon.

Supervisors Sean Elsbernd and Mark Farrell were the two dissenting votes.

More than half of the city's 850 miles of streets need to be repaved or reconstructed, a costly process that involves work to the concrete base instead of just the top few inches of asphalt, according to the mayor's office.

The bonds would raise $148.4 million for street repaving and reconstruction, $22 million for sidewalk accessibility improvements, $50 million for pedestrian and bicycle safety improvements, $20.3 million for street signal improvements, and $7.3 million for street repair and strengthening.

If passed by two-thirds of the city's voters in November, the measure would create about 1,600 construction jobs, according to the mayor's office.

Supervisor Scott Wiener said at Tuesday's board meeting that the bond measure will "play a key role in keeping the infrastructure of our city intact."

Wiener said the city cannot pay for these improvements out of its general fund "considering the 30 years we've neglected our roads and allowed them to fall into disrepair."

CONTACT: Mayor's Office of Communications (415) 554-6131 Supervisor Scott Wiener (415) 554-6968

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Public Asked To Participate In Emergency Website Test

Bay Area health officials are asking for the public's assistance to test an emergency website that would help in the event of an infectious disease emergency.

The website was designed to help the public receive life-saving medications in case of an emergency, health officials said.

In the event of an incident like an Anthrax attack, the website would allow the public to answer screening questions to speed up the process of dispensing the appropriate medicine.

The site also includes information regarding where emergency medicine dispensaries are located, how people can be trained to work at these dispensaries, and how businesses can participate, health officials said.

This screening exercise is a Bay Area-wide effort and health departments from around the region helped to create the screening questions that experts believe should be asked to prevent serious side effects from taking the wrong antibiotics.

To participate, visit www.BayAreaDisasterMeds.org and click on the "Get Medicine" tab.

Participants will be asked to print out a questionnaire and take a short survey.

They are also asked to fill out a questionnaire for the people they would potentially pick up medicine for, health officials said.

The process should take around 10 minutes.

Participants are urged to log on at 10 a.m., 2 p.m., or 4 p.m. if possible, although the public can participate at any time today.

CONTACT: Eileen Shields, SF Department of Public Health (415) 554-2507

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San Francisco Bay Area Wednesday News Roundup

SF Supes Approve Treasure Island Redevelopment

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors gave initial approval Tuesday night to a $1.5 billion plan to transform Treasure Island.

The board voted unanimously to certify the environmental review of the project, which would add up to 8,000 residential units, up to 140,000 square feet of commercial space and as much as 100,000 square feet of new office space to the island, as well as new and upgraded roads and infrastructure, including a new ferry terminal.

The city has been working to redevelop the 404-acre island in the middle of the Bay since the U.S. Navy closed its base there in 1997.

The San Francisco Planning Commission narrowly approved the project's environmental impact report by a 4-3 vote in April, and last month, a Board of Supervisors committee voted in favor of the plan.

But before the project could come in front of the full board, on May 11 a group of environmental advocates and other opponents of the plan filed an appeal that seeks to overturn the Planning Commission's approval of the plan.

The opponents who appealed the plan include Golden Gate Audubon, Sierra Club, Arc Ecology and Aaron Peskin, former president of the Board of Supervisors.

They say the environmental review did not adequately address various impacts of the project, including increased congestion on the Bay Bridge, the island's vulnerability to flooding from a tsunami or liquefaction during an earthquake, and toxicity left behind at the site of the shuttered naval base.

Peskin spoke during the public comment period of the hearing, asking the supervisors to send the plan back for more environmental review despite what he said is strong pressure from local business interests to approve the proposal. "I know you're under tremendous pressure, I know how much juice is behind this project," he said, adding that "specificity ... does not exist" in the current environmental impact report.

Officials with the city's Planning Department and other supporters of the project said during the meeting that there was indeed plenty of specificity in the environmental review.

 

Bank Robber Tried to Run Over Police Officers

A suspected Southern California bank robber who died from injuries sustained when he was shot by police Tuesday evening near San Francisco's Buena Vista Park allegedly tried to run over the officers before they opened fire, according to police.

The department was notified by the FBI that a stolen vehicle involved in an Irvine bank robbery was in San Francisco, and police said that vehicle was tracked through on-board GPS.

Officers responded at about 5:40 p.m. to the unit block of Buena Vista Ave East, which is between Haight Street and Duboce Ave, where they were trying to apprehend the suspect, police spokesman Lt. Troy Dangerfield said.

When the officers tried to stop the vehicle to arrest the man, the suspect allegedly attempted to run over the officers, and, fearing for their safety, the officers fired on the man, striking him, police said.

The man, whose name has not been released, was transported with life-threatening injuries to a hospital, and police said that the man died sometime before 7:45 p.m.

The vehicle was stolen on May 16 in Southern California, and the suspect was wanted in connection with two Irvine bank robberies, according to police.

Information about whether the suspect was armed was not yet available, Dangerfield said.

Police had closed off the area, including sidewalks, with police tape.

At least five patrol cars had responded to the intersection as of 6:20 p.m.

 

Antioch Woman On Trial for Torturing, Murdering Foster Daughter

Shemeeka Davis, an Antioch woman on trial for allegedly torturing and murdering her foster daughter, suffers from severe mental illness and delusions that caused her to believe that the child she killed was the devil, Davis' attorney Betty Barker said during opening statements in Martinez Tuesday.

Davis, 40, is charged with murder, torture and child abuse in connection with the Sept. 2, 2008, death of her 15-year-old niece, Jazzmin Davis.

She is also charged with abusing and torturing Jazzmin's twin brother, who is still alive.

Davis has entered a dual plea of not guilty and not guilty by reason of insanity, which means the trial will be held in two phases, the first to determine whether she is guilty and the second to determine whether she was legally sane at the time.

Prosecutor Satish Jallepalli said during his opening statements that the twins were born in San Francisco to a crack-addicted mother and a father who was in and out of prison.

Davis took them on as foster children as infants and raised them in Antioch with her own children.

"As the children got older it became very clear that there was a difference between them and the defendant's real children," Jallepalli said.

While the twins were still young, Davis began hitting them with spoons.

Then she moved onto belts and later to electrical cords, sticks and a hot iron, Jallepalli said.

Jazzmin and her brother were locked in their bedroom for long periods of time and forced to urinate and defecate on the floor, Jallepalli said.

"Jazzmin got skinnier and skinnier, and at some point the defendant realized that the children had to be kept out of public view," Jallepalli said.

He said that Jazzmin "was so bruised, so burned, so emaciated" that Davis could not let her go to school anymore without the abuse being discovered.

After her death, officials discovered that Jazzmin had not been to school in more than a year. The trial is scheduled to resume today in Contra Costa County Superior Court in Martinez.

 

SF Supes Put Up Street Repaving, Safety Bond for November Ballot

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to put a $248 million bond measure on the November ballot that would provide funding for pothole repair and street repavement.

The Road Repair and Street Safety Bond, announced by Mayor Ed Lee and several of the supervisors last month, would generate revenue for street repaving and reconstruction, as well as improvements in sidewalk accessibility, pedestrian and bicycle safety, and street signals.

The approval for putting the bond measure on the November ballot was passed by a 9-2 vote by the board Tuesday afternoon.

Supervisors Sean Elsbernd and Mark Farrell were the two dissenting votes.

More than half of the city's 850 miles of streets need to be repaved or reconstructed, a costly process that involves work to the concrete base instead of just the top few inches of asphalt, according to the mayor's office.

The bonds would raise $148.4 million for street repaving and reconstruction, $22 million for sidewalk accessibility improvements, $50 million for pedestrian and bicycle safety improvements, $20.3 million for street signal improvements, and $7.3 million for street repair and strengthening.

If passed by two-thirds of the city's voters in November, the measure would create about 1,600 construction jobs, according to the mayor's office.

Supervisor Scott Wiener said at Tuesday's board meeting that the bond measure will "play a key role in keeping the infrastructure of our city intact."

Wiener said the city cannot pay for these improvements out of its general fund "considering the 30 years we've neglected our roads and allowed them to fall into disrepair."

 

With Budget Deficit, SJ City Council, Mayor Accept Salary Cut

The San Jose City Council voted Tuesday to accept a 10 percent cut in salary and benefits for the mayor and council members, amid a $115 million budget deficit.

The council approved a recommendation to put in place a 10 percent cut in total compensation, including salary, car allowance, medical, dental, and other benefits, on an 8-3 vote, with Councilmen Kansen Chu and Xavier Campos and Councilwoman Nancy Pyle dissenting.

The council also agreed to direct city staff to begin exploring a change in retirement plan benefits for current and future council members, as was suggested in a memo by Councilman Pete Constant.

A salary setting commission made the salary rate recommendations, as it is required to do every two years under San Jose's city charter.

The city council can approve a salary rate lower than the recommendation, but not higher.

The commission recommended that the council reduce the mayor's annual salary from $127,000 to $114,000 and the council members' annual salaries from $90,000 to $81,000.

The commission additionally recommended cutting the car allowance for the mayor and council members from $600 per month to $350 per month.

The salary change will be in effect from June 26 through June 30, 2013. Since taking office in 2007, Mayor Chuck Reed has voluntarily given up the monthly car allowance and all pay increases, holding his pay at $105,000, according to the mayor's office.

Last year, the council agreed to a one-time 10 percent reduction in total compensation.

Pyle said she could not support the ordinance because she needed more time to study Constant's recommendations.

Chu and Campos opposed the recommendation to reduce council members' salaries, saying that it would limit the talent pool and attract mostly people who are wealthy.

 

Juvenile Shot in Mid-Market

An afternoon shooting near a busy tourist spot in San Francisco's Mid-Market neighborhood left a juvenile male injured and police searching for clues, a police spokesman said.

Police received reports of shots heard near several intersections around Market -- including Market and Fifth streets, Market and Sixth streets, and Turk and Taylor streets -- at about 4:30 p.m., Sgt. Michael Andraychak said.

Officers responded and determined that the shooting took place at Fifth and Market streets, which is where both the Powell Street BART station and the Westfield San Francisco Centre mall are located.

The juvenile who was shot had apparently ran to Turk Street, where he was picked up by a good Samaritan motorist, Andraychak said.

Officers stopped the car containing the victim at Turk and Leavenworth streets, and the victim, who was found with a gunshot wound, was transported by ambulance to a hospital, according to Andraychak.

The victim's injury was not considered life-threatening.

The investigation is ongoing, and no suspect description or motive was available as of 7:15 p.m., Andraychak said.

 

CA Prisons Prepare to Reduce Inmate Population

California's prisons chief said Tuesday the state has a plan to obey a Supreme Court command to reduce the number of inmates by 33,500, but said the Legislature's aid in funding a key element is "absolutely critical."

"We're out of time and we're out of room. We've got to get this done," said Matthew Cate, secretary of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. "This is going to take a joint effort," he said. Cate spoke at a news conference in Sacramento at the same time that state lawyers filed an update on the plan with a panel of three federal judges based in San Francisco, Sacramento and Los Angeles. 

The report was required by a May 23 ruling in which the U.S. Supreme Court, by a 5-4 vote, upheld a 2009 decision by the three-judge panel.

The high court agreed with the panel's conclusion that severe overcrowding was the main cause of unconstitutional, "grossly inadequate" health care in the prisons and that the population must be reduced to enable minimum standards to be achieved.

The court majority affirmed a panel order requiring the state to reduce its adult prison population by 33,500 within two years, and to file updates every six months, beginning with the one due Tuesday.

Cate said at the news conference and in the filing that a key part of the plan is the so-called realignment, or transfer, of low-risk, nonviolent offenders from state prisons to county jails.

The process, which the filing said would reduce the state prison population by "tens of thousands," was outlined in AB 109, enacted by the Legislature and signed by Gov. Brown this spring.

But to be implemented, the realignment requires additional funding for county sheriffs, which the Legislature has not yet provided.

"We have to have legislative support for this. If AB 109 is not implemented, I don't see what we're going to do," Cate said.

Other population reduction measures, the filing said, are increases in sentencing credits for certain low-risk inmates, transfers of some inmates to out-of-state prisons and substitution of drug rehabilitation programs for prison for some parole violators.

 

Authorities Identify Dumped Body as SJ Resident

Authorities have identified the body of a woman found Sunday in a large garbage bag dumped near bushes as 46-year-old San Jose resident Maria Orozco, a Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety captain said.

Preliminary results had identified the body as that of an adult Hispanic female after it was found in the 800 block of Ticonderoga Drive in a loosely cinched large garbage bag, Capt. David Verbrugge said.

An autopsy conducted Monday identified Orozco using her fingerprints, Verbrugge said.

The Santa Clara County medical examiner's office determined the cause of death was trauma to the head, according to Verbrugge.

The Santa Clara County Crime Lab and the medical examiner's office began identifying the body after someone reported the bag at 10 a.m. on Sunday morning, Verbrugge said.

Anyone with details about the case is asked to call the Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety at (408) 730-7110. Those who wish to remain anonymous can provide information by sending an email to SVTIP@tipnow.org.

 

Middle-Age man Stabbed to Death, Found in Storage Facility

A body found at a San Mateo storage facility Tuesday afternoon is believed to be that of a middle-aged man who was stabbed to death, a San Mateo police spokesman said.

Police Sgt. Dave Norris said the body was found at about 1:30 p.m. on the property of All American Self Storage at 2000 E. Third Ave., at Detroit Drive.

Police have released few details about the crime, but say it was not random and appears to be an isolated incident.

Investigators believe the victim was killed in a stabbing and are "treating it as a recent crime," Norris said.

Both entrances to All American Self Storage were blocked off by yellow police tape Tuesday afternoon as police investigated the stabbing.

The area around Detroit Drive and East Third Avenue has been shut down and police are advising residents to stay away from the area.

 

Sonoma Sheriff Investigates Mysterious Death, Burning Car

The Sonoma County Sheriff's Office is investigating the mysterious death of a person who was found in a burning car on state Highway 128 in northern Sonoma County Tuesday afternoon, California Highway Patrol Officer Jon Sloat said.

The CHP initially reported that the victim died when a blue Ford Explorer veered off the highway near the Mendocino County line and crashed around 12:40 p.m.

Sloat said another motorist reported seeing the SUV up against a berm on the road's shoulder, engulfed in flames, with its wheels spinning.

"There was evidence of an intentional fire," Sloat said.

He said many questions remain about the incident, including whether it was a suicide, but that the CHP has turned over the investigation to the sheriff's office.

The Sonoma County Sheriff's Office did not immediately return calls for comment.

 

Santa Clara City Council Updated on 49ers Stadium

The Santa Clara City Council will receive an update on the 49ers stadium project at its meeting Tuesday night.

Staff will discuss the status of negotiations and the tasks that have been accomplished so far related to the planned stadium for the San Francisco 49ers next to the Great America theme park.

One of the updates is related to work on a draft of the disposition and development agreement between the city's Stadium Authority and 49ers Stadium Company, or Stadco, which must be completed by the fall, said Carol McCarthy, acting assistant city manager.

Also in the works is the finance plan for the stadium, which specifies exactly how the stadium will be constructed and how each portion will be funded.

The city's goal is to complete the plan by next summer, McCarthy said.

Plans are also being made to start site preparation and utility relocation prior to the beginning of construction in 2013, McCarthy said.

The city is also working on drafting lease documents, which would be executed in the fall of 2012.

The 68,500-seat stadium is expected to open in time for the 2015 football season.

Since voters approved the project last June, the cost has risen from $937 million to $950 million, but that figure could continue to fluctuate, McCarthy said.

 

I-80 Closed After Big-Rig Falls From On-Ramp

Two lanes of eastbound Interstate Highway 80 in Oakland near the MacArthur Maze were blocked Tuesday night after a big-rig fell from a nearby on-ramp, overturning in a grassy area, a California Highway Patrol officer said.

The white 2000 Peterbilt tractor, which was hauling a load of rubbish in an open-top trailer, had been navigating an on-ramp that leads from West Grand Avenue to the MacArthur Maze, CHP Officer Ralph Caggiano said.

"Somehow he lost control of his truck, and on that transition ramp, instead of turning right with the curve, he lost control and went left over the side," Caggiano said.

The truck landed in the grassy shoulder that borders eastbound I-80 before the split with Interstate Highway 580.

The CHP was notified at about 8:05 p.m. of the crash, which did not block traffic or cause other accidents, Caggiano said.

The driver sustained a broken arm from the crash and the trailer spilled some of its load onto the grassy patch, he said.

Two right lanes of eastbound I-80 before the I-580 split, which were closed to aid in removing the wreckage, remained closed until about 1:15 a.m. today.

 

Weather Forecast

The Bay Area is expected to be cloudy with patchy fog this morning, becoming partly cloudy, with highs in the upper 50s to mid 70s.

It is expected to be partly cloudy this evening, becoming cloudy with patchy fog after midnight.

Lows are expected to be in the upper 40s to mid 50s.

Thursday is expected to be partly cloudy, with patchy fog in the morning and highs in the lower 60s to mid 70s.

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Supervisors Approve Treasure Island

Supervisors Approve Treasure Island Plan

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors gave initial approval
tonight to a $1.5 billion plan to transform Treasure Island.

The board voted unanimously to certify the environmental review of
the project, which would add up to 8,000 residential units, up to 140,000
square feet of commercial space and as much as 100,000 square feet of new
office space to the island, as well as new and upgraded roads and
infrastructure, including a new ferry terminal.

The city has been working to redevelop the 404-acre island in the
middle of the Bay since the U.S. Navy closed its base there in 1997.

The San Francisco Planning Commission narrowly approved the
project's environmental impact report by a 4-3 vote in April, and last month,
a Board of Supervisors committee voted in favor of the plan. But before the project could come in front of the full board, on May 11 a group of environmental advocates and other opponents of the plan filed an appeal that seeks to overturn the Planning Commission's approval of the plan.

The opponents who appealed the plan include Golden Gate Audubon,
Sierra Club, Arc Ecology and Aaron Peskin, former president of the Board of
Supervisors.

They say the environmental review did not adequately address
various impacts of the project, including increased congestion on the Bay
Bridge, the island's vulnerability to flooding from a tsunami or liquefaction
during an earthquake, and toxicity left behind at the site of the shuttered
naval base.

Peskin Opposes

Peskin spoke during the public comment period of the hearing,
asking the supervisors to send the plan back for more environmental review
despite what he said is strong pressure from local business interests to
approve the proposal.

"I know you're under tremendous pressure, I know how much juice is
behind this project," he said, adding that "specificity ... does not exist"
in the current environmental impact report.

Officials with the city's Planning Department and other supporters
of the project said during the meeting that there was indeed plenty of
specificity in the environmental review.

"There are few projects in the history of San Francisco that have
had this kind of scrutiny," said Jim Lazarus, senior vice president of the
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce.

After a four-hour hearing, the board eventually voted 11-0 to
reject the appeal and certify the environmental review of the plan, then also
voted unanimously to approve the plan itself. The proposal will come in front
of the supervisors again next week for final approval. Following tonight's vote, Supervisor Jane Kim, whose district includes Treasure Island, thanked everyone who has supported redeveloping the island in the 14 years since the Navy left.

Peskin, on the other hand, was sharply critical of his former
colleagues and successors on the board following the vote.

"This is a triumph of politics over public policy," he said. "The
supervisors made a terrible mistake that's going to affect the San Francisco
Bay Area for generations to come."
   

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San Francisco Supervisors Approve Streets Repaving Bond

Supervisors Approve Streets Bond

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors gave initial approval today
to a plan to put a $248 million bond measure on the November ballot to
provide funding for pothole repair and street repavement.

    The Road Repair and Street Safety Bond, announced by Mayor Ed Lee
and several of the supervisors last month, would generate revenue for street
repaving and reconstruction, as well as improvements in sidewalk
accessability, pedestrian and bicycle safety, and street signals.

    The initial approval for putting the bond measure on the November
ballot was passed by a 9-2 vote by the board this afternoon. Supervisors Sean
Elsbernd and Mark Farrell were the two dissenting votes.

    More than half of the city's 850 miles of streets need to be
repaved or reconstructed, a costly process that involves work to the concrete
base instead of just the top few inches of asphalt, according to the mayor's
office.

The bonds would raise $148.4 million for street repaving and
reconstruction, $22 million for sidewalk accessibility improvements, $50
million for pedestrian and bicycle safety improvements, $20.3 million for
street signal improvements, and $7.3 million for street repair and
strengthening.

If passed by two-thirds of the city's voters in November, the
measure would create about 1,600 construction jobs, according to the mayor's
office.

Supervisor Scott Wiener said at today's board meeting that the
bond measure will "play a key role in keeping the infrastructure of our city
intact."

Wiener said the city cannot pay for these improvements out of its
general fund "considering the 30 years we've neglected our roads and allowed
them to fall into disrepair." The measure will come in front of the board again next week for final approval.

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Man Convicted Of Second-Degree Murder For 2008 Atal Beating

A man was convicted of second-degree murder Monday for the savage beating of a homeless woman outside a nightclub in San Francisco's South of Market neighborhood in 2008, prosecutors said.

Anthony Marks, 46, was found guilty by a San Francisco Superior Court jury of killing Robin Kent, 44, whose battered body was found on March 12, 2008, outside the front door of the Boss Nightclub at 750 Harrison St.

Police and prosecutors said the murder was unrelated to the nightclub, but rather stemmed from a dispute between Marks and Kent, who were both homeless and had a turbulent ongoing relationship.

Marks, who had been convicted of assaulting Kent earlier that year, was arrested days after her death and confessed to the murder.

Prosecutor Scot Clark had sought a first-degree murder conviction, saying that the attack was premeditated and occurred while Kent was asleep on the ground outside the club.

Marks' attorney, Deputy Public Defender Mark Iverson, had argued that it was a crime of passion and did not meet the legal standards of first-degree murder.

The jury was given the case on Friday following closing arguments by the prosecution and defense, and returned with the guilty verdict on a second-degree murder charge late Monday afternoon, district attorney's spokesman Seth Steward said.

The trial, which started late last month, was delayed briefly last Wednesday when a juror came back from the lunch break apparently under the influence of drugs and was dismissed by San Francisco Superior Court Judge Susan Breall.

Marks will return to court on Aug. 26 to set a date for his sentencing.

CONTACT: San Francisco District Attorney's Office (415) 553-1014 San Francisco Public Defender's Office (415) 575-4390

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Man Injured In Potrero Hill Shooting Monday Morning

A man was injured in a shooting in San Francisco's Potrero Hill neighborhood on Monday morning, police said.

The shooting was reported around 10:05 a.m. in the 1000 block of Wisconsin Street.

Three males got out of a car and chased the 30-year-old victim before shooting him three times, according to police.

The victim was taken to San Francisco General Hospital to be treated for his injuries, which are not considered life-threatening.

The suspects fled and have not been found. T

hey were driving a black Honda or Kia, police said.

Anyone with information about the shooting is encouraged to call the Police Department's anonymous tip line at (415) 575-4444 or send a tip by text message to TIP411.

CONTACT: San Francisco police (415) 553-165

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Man Shot Outside His Home In Visitacion Valley

A man was injured in a shooting outside his home in San Francisco's Visitacion Valley neighborhood on Monday afternoon, police said.

The shooting was reported around 3:25 p.m. in the first block of Blythedale Avenue.

The 28-year-old victim was outside his home when he was shot.

His injuries are not considered life-threatening, according to police. T

he suspects, a male and female, fled in a green 1990s station wagon and had not been found as of this morning, police said.

Anyone with information about the shooting is encouraged to call the Police Department's anonymous tip line at (415) 575-4444 or send a tip by text message to TIP411.

CONTACT: San Francisco police (415) 553-1651

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Former HS Football Star Dies After Being Wounded In May 26 Shooting

A former local high school football star died Monday after being shot in San Francisco's Bayview District last month.

David Henderson, 21, of San Francisco, died at San Francisco General Hospital, according to the medical examiner's office.

Henderson, a San Francisco resident who attended Abraham Lincoln High School and was playing on the semi-professional Pacifica Islanders football team, was injured in a shooting reported at about 12:05 p.m. on May 26 in the 1400 block of Kirkwood Avenue.

Emergency responders took him to San Francisco General Hospital, police said.

According to a fundraising page supporting Henderson's recovery that was set up by the Pacifica Islanders, he was shot three times, and one of the bullets severed his spinal cord.

Henderson played running back and defensive back for the team, according to its website.

Police have not announced any arrests in the shooting.

Anyone with information about the shooting is encouraged to call the Police Department's anonymous tip line at (415) 575-4444 or send a tip by text message to TIP411.

CONTACT: San Francisco police (415) 553-1651 San Francisco medical examiner's office (415) 553-1694

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Firework Explodes In Mailbox, Bomb Squad Responds

A small firework exploded in a mailbox in San Francisco's Richmond District this afternoon, prompting a bomb squad response and street closures, a police sergeant said.

The explosion was reported at about 1:25 p.m. in a blue U.S. Postal Service collection box at the corner of 24th Avenue and Clement Street, police Sgt. Mike Andraychak said.

The department's bomb squad responded and police blocked off Clement Street between 22nd Avenue and 25th Avenue, and 24th Avenue from Geary Boulevard to California Street, Andraychak said.

The exterior of the mailbox was not damaged, which suggested the explosive device was relatively small, he said.

Investigators determined that a firework had been lit and tossed into the mailbox, Andraychak said.

He said no evacuations were needed, and that San Francisco Municipal Railway service was not affected.

No injuries were reported.

San Francisco police and postal service police are continuing to investigate the explosion, Andraychak said.

The scene was cleared at about 2:25 p.m.

CONTACT: San Francisco police media line (415) 553-1651

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SF Supes Give Final Approval To Parkmerced Project

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors gave final approval today to a plan to add thousands of apartments and demolish others at the Parkmerced complex near San Francisco State University.

Developers are looking to expand the large complex at 19th and Holloway avenues by adding about 5,700 new residential units and replacing about 1,800 units in the next two or three decades.

The board this afternoon voted 6-5 in favor of certifying the environmental review of the project -- the same vote it received during the board's initial vote of approval two weeks ago.

The plan had drawn strong opposition from residents who said it would displace and inconvenience them and create traffic gridlock.

Before today's final vote, board president David Chiu said in the past two weeks, he talked to some of the leaders of Parkmerced's tenant organizations and the project's developer, and negotiated additional protections for the tenants.

"I fully appreciate the concerns raised by some tenant leaders ... but after years of planning and meetings and discussion, I think it's time to move forward."

The supervisors who voted against the plan were David Campos, Ross Mirkarimi, John Avalos, Jane Kim and Eric Mar.

CONTACT: P.J. Johnston for Parkmerced (415) 731-3304 Terence Faulkner, Parkmerced Action Coalition (415) 286-8687 Judson True for Chiu (415) 554-7451

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Coit Tower Lit Up In Red To Honor Fallen Firefighters

San Francisco's Coit Tower will be lit up in red this week to honor two firefighters who died after battling a fire in the city's Diamond Heights neighborhood on Thursday.

Lt. Vincent Perez, 48, and firefighter-paramedic Anthony Valerio, 53, were fatally injured fighting a fire at 133 Berkeley Way on Thursday morning.

"Coit Tower and its storied history with the San Francisco Fire Department is a fitting location to offer a tribute to both Lt. Vincent Perez and Firefighter Anthony Valerio, two firefighters who dedicated their lives to protecting the people of San Francisco," Mayor Ed Lee said in a statement.

Coit Tower was built on Telegraph Hill in 1933 at the behest of Lillie Hitchcock Coit, an avid supporter of San Francisco firefighters and an honorary member of the Knickerbocker Engine Company Number Five, according to the mayor's office.

The tower will be illuminated in red from tonight through Friday evening in memory of the two fallen firefighters.

"The Coit Tower tribute is a fitting show of honor and respect for Vince and Tony, their families and the other members of the San Francisco Fire Department who have lost two very dear friends," Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White said in a statement.

The San Francisco firefighters' union has established trust accounts for the Perez and Valerio families at the San Francisco Fire Credit Union.

Donations can be sent to the credit union at 3201 California St., San Francisco, 94118. Condolence messages can be sent to Fire Station 26, 80 Digby St., San Francisco, 94131.

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San Francisco Bay Area Tuesday News Roundup

Search Continues for Hayward Nursing Student - Police Suspect Homicide

As the search for a missing Bay Area nursing student continues into its second week, police in Hayward announced Monday that the department has classified the case as a homicide.

Michelle Le went missing on May 27 at 7 p.m. from Kaiser Permanente Hayward Medical Center at 27303 Sleepy Hollow Ave.

Le told classmates she was planning to drive to Reno after her rotation at the Kaiser hospital in Hayward.

She left during a break and did not return, according to Hayward police.

Based on what police said is compelling evidence recovered during the investigation that "points conclusively to homicide," the search has officially become "an effort of recovery," according to police.

"We realize this is the worst possible news for Michelle's family and friends, and for everyone involved in looking for her," police said in a statement Monday night.

Factors that led to this classification, police said, include forensic evidence collected from Le's car and the area of the parking structure where it was located, information collected during interviews, examination of evidence gathered during service of search warrants, review of video footage from the garage and other locations, and examination of Le's cellphone records.

As of Monday, more than 25 people have been questioned regarding the case, police said.

No one has been charged for Le's murder.

The Alamdea County District Attorney's Office is also evaluating the case, and police said that there would be no reduction in investigative staff working the case.

Earlier Monday it was announced that the reward for information leading to Le's whereabouts increased with pledges from the university where she was enrolled in a nursing program and her workplace, a university spokeswoman said.

Samuel Merritt University and Turner Construction Company pledged a combined $45,000 reward, totaling $65,000 when combined with family contributions and donations for information leading to the 26-year-old's safe return.

Le has worked with Turner Construction Company part-time as an accounting clerk for five years, Samuel Merritt University spokeswoman Elizabeth Valente said.

Le is 5 feet 6 inches tall with black hair and brown eyes.

Anyone with information about Le's whereabouts is encouraged to call Hayward police at (510) 293-7000.

 

Union Members Protest at San Jose City Hall for Pension Reform

Since 4 a.m. Monday, members of three labor unions have been in an RV parked across from San Jose City Hall to coax city officials to come and negotiate pension reform.

The members are part of the Association of Engineers and Architects, the Association of Maintenance Supervisory Personnel and the City Association of Management Personnel.

A row of them stood before the RV at a demonstration Monday afternoon holding a large sign that read, "Tell the truth, negotiate now."

"The best way to reform the pension system is to negotiate, not dictate," Ben Fields, from the South Bay Labor Council, said.

Fields was there to support the unions, who were demonstrating because they say the city administration is ignoring the City Council's direction to meet and discuss cost-saving pension reform proposals and retiree health care benefits for current and future employees, according to Tom Saggau, a spokesman for the firefighters union.

He said that, publicly, the city has been clamoring for pension reform, but instead of sitting down to discuss the issue with the unions, city officials want to discuss ballot language for Mayor Chuck Reed's proposed pension reform measure.

The proposal would have to be approved by voters because many of the recommendations require changes to the city charter.

Reed has said retirement costs are "skyrocketing" and contributing to the city's $115 million budget deficit, which will likely force the city to lay off hundreds of workers, including 195 sworn police positions and 64 firefighter positions as well as reduce library service to three days a week.

Retirement costs are projected to rise to $400 million by 2016, and could be closer to $650 million after actuarial adjustments.

Reed has said his proposal, which calls for setting limits on retirement benefits for new employees, current employees and retirees, would help the city avoid further cuts to services and the loss of hundreds of jobs, but that it is not the only solution to the fiscal problem

 

Dublin Woman Admits to Killing Ex-Husband's Grandmother

Rosa Hill admitted Monday that she killed her husband's 91-year-old grandmother and then stuffed her into a garbage can.

Hill, 36, conceded that she was armed with a gun, a Taser, a stun gun, a sword and other weapons when she went to Selma Hill's home in the 7700 block of Peppertree Road in Dublin on Jan. 7, 2009, but said she acted in self-defense because the elderly woman was wielding a knife.

Rosa Hill said she went to the residence because her then-husband, Eric Hill, lived there with their daughter and she believed that he had been molesting the girl, who was 2 years old at the time.

Eric Hill has denied that he molested his daughter.

Rosa and Eric Hill got married in 2005 and had their daughter in 2006 but separated in 2007 and ultimately were divorced.

There was a custody battle over their daughter and a family court gave Eric Hill sole legal custody and 85 percent physical custody over her.

In her third day on the witness stand in her trial on charges that she murdered Selma Hill and attempted to murder Eric Hill in an alleged plot to take her child back, Rosa Hill said she saw her husband and daughter naked together in a compromising position when she climbed a tree to spy on them on Jan. 7, 2009.

Rosa Hill said that after her husband drove off, apparently to go to work, she approached Selma Hill when the elderly woman was taking out the garbage and tried to talk to her about her concern that Eric Hill was molesting their daughter.

But Rosa Hill said Selma Hill told her that her grandson "could do whatever he wanted to do" because he had custody and "if I interfered I would never see my baby again."

She said she was "shocked" and "really upset and angry" about Selma Hill's comments and she hit Selma Hill after the 91-year-old picked up a knife and "it seemed like she was swinging the knife toward me."

 

Marin Supervisors Consider More Cuts to Balance Budget

Marin County Administrator Matthew Hymel will present the county's 2011-12 budget to the Board of Supervisors today.

The $440.6 million operating budget is 0.7 percent less than last year's budget, and the $372.4 general fund budget is 0.4 percent less than the 2010-11 budget, Marin County's budget manager Dan Eilerman said.

Marin supervisors have already approved $4.3 million in cuts to balance the 2011-12 budget, and Hymel is proposing an additional $1.3 million in reductions, Eilerman said.

The $5.6 million in total reductions eliminates 60 positions in the general fund budget, including 24 potential layoffs that are part of the additional $1.3 million reduction, Eilerman said.

Twelve of the 24 layoffs will occur because the county is closing its obstetrical clinical services program at the Health and Wellness Campus in San Rafael, Eilerman said.

When the county opened the clinic 18 years ago, no other agency provided women's health services, Eilerman said. Marin Community clinics now provide comprehensive primary care and obstetrical services and they are able to receive significantly higher federal reimbursements than the county, Eilerman said.

The latest $1.3 million round of reductions will impact 40-50 employees, Eilerman said.

There has been a hiring freeze in the county since 2007 that has resulted in the elimination of more than 200 positions, 85 percent of which were reduced through attrition, saving the county $30 million over four years, Eilerman said.

Marin County has set aside $5 million in anticipation of an anticipated loss of state revenue for county programs, Eilerman said.

County departments also will develop contingency plans to reduce spending further once the state budget impacts are known, Eilerman said.

Marin County is still feeling the effects of reduced sales and property tax revenue and has taken a multi-year approach to balance its budget Eilerman said. "The proposed budget reflects our fourth consecutive year of budget reductions to adapt to our new economic reality," Hymel said.

 

Hercules Mayor and Councilmember May Be Recalled

Voters in Hercules will be deciding whether to recall Mayor Joanne Ward and City Councilman Donald Kuehne during a special election today.

Organizers of the recall effort say on their website that the need for the recall became clear when the Hercules City Council fired interim City Manager Charlie Long in December.

Recall proponents have argued that Long was fired for "revealing the truth about city financial woes," according to recall papers served on the council members in January.

Former mayor Ed Balico resigned in January moments before he too was served with recall papers.

The notices accuse Ward and Kuehne of "failed leadership" that has led to the "unprecedented financial crisis" the city is now facing.

According to the notices, the mayor and council members voted to approve multi-million dollar, no-bid contracts to a company owned by former City Manager Nelson Oliva's family and supported "sweetheart development deals that have depleted the city's redevelopment funds."

When Long was the city manager, he published weekly reports which allegedly revealed the city's negative financial condition, organizers said.

Kuehne could not be immediately reached for comment, but on his website, truthaboutherculesrecall.com, he claims that he is being blamed for things that happened before he was elected to the city council in 2008.

"In my first year on the City Council, I advocated independent audits of the City's budget and la

ter I pushed for outside reviews of the City Manager," Kuehne said on his website.

"I was confronted by a stone wall when I asked probing questions. I was told time and time again that all financial information could only come from the City Manager. I was shocked when the City Attorney said that the conflict-of-interest with the City Manager's daughters was legal!"

Ward also could not be immediately reached for comment.

She was elected to the city council in 2000 and is currently serving as mayor in her third consecutive four-year term, according to the city's website.

 

Community Organizing Peace March After 5 Shootings in Oakland

Following a violent weekend in Oakland with five separate shootings that left one man dead, an Oakland community is planning a peace march, organizers said.

Oakland Community Organizations expects more than 400 parents, students, and teachers from Greenleaf Whittier Elementary School and St. Bernard Church to convene today at the elementary school for a 3 p.m. "peace walk" through what community organizers call "the most violent neighborhood in East Oakland," according to organizer Emma Paulino.

After the walk, a meeting is scheduled with city officials, including Oakland police Chief Anthony Batts, to demand a response to increased gun violence in the area, Paulino said.

"We have been working with the city for years and nothing has happened," Paulino said about community efforts with the community's Oakland police patrol division.

The march follows six shootings over the weekend, some near the school and community, including a shooting Sunday afternoon in the 1400 block of Seminary Avenue that police say left one person in critical condition.

Another nearby shooting in the 2400 block of 90th Avenue injured a 52-year-old Oakland resident in the man's apartment complex driveway on Saturday night, Oakland police said.

The victim was reported in stable condition.

On Saturday afternoon, in the 2900 block of High Street, 50-year-old Leo Dunson was shot and died from his gunshot wounds, police said.

Other shootings from the weekend left five people with gunshot injuries, police said.

At about 1:22 a.m. in the area of 59th and Genoa streets, officers found two men suffering from gunshot wounds that did not appear to be life-threatening injuries.

Just before 2 a.m., a shooting outside of a nightclub in the 1200 block of Webster Avenue left one man in critical condition and hospitalized two other men, according to police.

Two of the gunshot victims, who were taken to the hospital, were in stable condition.

The third man was scheduled to undergo surgery for critical injuries Sunday morning after he was found shot at 1:55 a.m., Oakland police Officer Kevin McDonald said.

 

Dumped Body in Sunnyvale Identified as Hispanic Female

Preliminary results from an autopsy of a body found stuffed into a garbage bag and dumped into the bushes of a Sunnyvale home on Sunday morning reveal the body was that of a Hispanic adult female, a Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety captain said.

Capt. Dave Verbrugge said further details identifying the Hispanic adult woman were not available, as the autopsy was still underway.

Once dental records, DNA or any other type of identification are found, officers can start piecing together who this woman was and how she ended up in the 800 block of Ticonderoga Drive in a loosely cinched large garbage bag, he said.

Hayward police, who are investigating the disappearance of 26-year-old Samuel Merritt University nursing student Michelle Le -- last seen in Hayward on May 27 -- spoke with Sunnyvale officials Monday to see if the body had been identified as an Asian female.

Since results have identified the body as a Hispanic adult female, Hayward police determined the body was not connected to the Le case, Verbrugge said.

The Santa Clara County Crime Lab and the Santa Clara County medical examiner's office took custody of the body after someone reported the bag at 10 a.m. on Sunday morning, Verbrugge added.

More details are expected to be disclosed when the medical examiner's office completes its autopsy of the body, according to Verbrugge.

Anyone with details about the body is asked to call the Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety at (408) 730-7110. Those who wish to remain anonymous can provide information by sending an email to SVTIP@tipnow.org.

 

Redwood City Mother Protected Sons With Own Body in Shooting

A 22-year-old Redwood City mother said Monday that she used her body to try to protect her two children during a shooting in East Palo Alto that killed her infant son early Sunday morning.

Ivonne Garcia Lopez, who was shot in the leg in the attack, said she threw herself over her 4-year-old son Isaiah and 3-month-old son Izak Jesus when two people opened fire on the family's car as they left a baby shower on Wisteria Lane around 1 a.m.

"They destroyed my family," Garcia Lopez said. "I am so devastated with this loss."

The young mother cried intermittently as she gave her account of the shooting at a noon news conference held by East Palo Alto police, who were announcing the arrest of a 17-year-old boy in the case.

Garcia Lopez said she and her husband, 22-year-old Oscar Jimenez, were driving away from the party when the gunmen opened fire, shooting at the car from the side.

Isaiah was not injured in the shooting, Garcia Lopez said.

Izak, who would have been 4 months old on June 12, suffered a gunshot wound to the head.

"I took him out of the car seat and he had a hole in his head," she said, weeping. Jimenez called 911 to report the shooting and drove the family to Stanford Hospital, where Izak was declared dead at about 2:15 a.m.

Investigators believe the shooting may have been a mistaken act of retaliation for a gang-related beating that occurred in Redwood City on May 31.

Acting police Capt. Jeff Liu said investigators believe the teen they have arrested for the killing mistook the victims for Sureno gang members who had beaten him up.

Investigators believe that early Sunday morning, the 17-year-old and a second person spotted the victims in East Palo Alto and thought they were the attackers, Liu said.

"Our investigation tells us that the suspect that we've arrested saw two individuals on Wisteria he believed to have participated in the crime in Redwood City," Liu said.

Police believe the teen and his cohort then armed themselves and opened fire on the car, he said.

 

SF Supervisors Consider Appeal of Treasure Island Development

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors today will consider an appeal by opponents of a $1.5 billion project to transform Treasure Island.

The proposal would add up to 8,000 residential units, up to 140,000 square feet of commercial space and as much as 100,000 square feet of new office space to the island, as well as new and upgraded roads and infrastructure, including a new ferry terminal.

The city has been working to redevelop the 404-acre island in the middle of the Bay since the U.S. Navy closed its base there in 1997. 

The San Francisco Planning Commission narrowly approved the project's environmental impact report by a 4-3 vote in April, and last month, a Board of Supervisors committee voted in favor of the plan.

But before the project could go in front of the full board, on May 11 a group of environmental advocates and other opponents of the plan filed an appeal that seeks to overturn the Planning Commission's approval of the plan.

The opponents include Golden Gate Audubon, Sierra Club, Arc Ecology and Aaron Peskin, former president of the Board of Supervisors.

Among the complaints in the appeal, opponents argue that the environmental review did not adequately address various impacts of the project, including increased congestion on the Bay Bridge, and the island's vulnerability to flooding from a tsunami or liquefaction during an earthquake.

Although the board meeting starts at 2 p.m. at City Hall, the opponents' appeal will not be considered until 5 p.m.

Supervisors have a busy agenda for today's meeting -- besides the Treasure Island issue, the board will also consider an appeal of the environmental review of the North Beach Public Library, and is also expected to give final approval to a plan to revamp the Parkmerced complex near San Francisco State University.

For more information about the Treasure Island redevelopment project, visit www.treasureislandsfbay.com.

 

SF Man Arrested for Carrying Loaded Gun, Resisting Arrest

A San Francisco man was arrested in Antioch early Saturday for allegedly carrying a loaded gun in his pocket, wearing body armor and resisting arrest, police said Monday.

At about 12:45 a.m., police received a report of several people gambling at a bar at 2500 Sycamore Drive.

When officers got there, they saw several people kneeling on the ground with money and dice in front of them, according to police. As the officers approached, most of the people ran away, police said.

One man, however, walked toward the officers.

The officers saw that the man, later identified as 42-year-old San Francisco resident Aaron Harris, was wearing body armor under his sweatshirt, and spotted what looked like a gun inside the front pocket of his sweatshirt, police said.

When the officers attempted to arrest Harris, he allegedly resisted, according to police.

He was arrested after a struggle, and police seized the gun.

During the arrest, someone else fired two rounds in the parking lot of the bar, and other officers went to look for the shooter but didn't the person.

Harris was booked into county jail on suspicion of several firearms violations, being a felon in possession of body armor and resisting arrest.

He has what police described as a "lengthy criminal history," which includes a prior conviction in San Mateo County for possession of crack cocaine for sale in 1989 and a prior conviction in Contra Costa County for assault with a firearm, first-degree burglary and possession of a firearm by a felon in 1994.

Harris was sentenced to state prison in both cases, police said.

 

Tourist Mugged near USF

A German tourist was robbed at gunpoint near the University of San Francisco campus on Saturday afternoon, police said.

The robbery was reported at 4:45 p.m. Saturday near the intersection of Clayton and Fulton streets.

The tourist was robbed of his phone, camera and cash, according to police.

The robber used a black pistol.

The suspect fled and has not been found. He is described as a black man between 18 and 25 years old, about 5 feet 7 inches tall and weighing about 150 pounds.

He has black hair, and was last seen wearing a blue hooded sweatshirt and dark, baggy jeans.

German tourists have also been the victims of other crimes in San Francisco in the past year.

In August 2010, Mechthild Schroer, a 50-year-old woman from Germany, was fatally shot when she was apparently caught in the crossfire of a shootout between groups of people in the city's theater district.

Less than a week later, Nils Linke, 21, was killed by a hit-and-run driver while riding a bike in the city's North of Panhandle neighborhood.

An arrest was made in the hit-and-run case shortly after it happened, and last month seven people were arrested in connection with Schroer's death.

Both cases are pending in San Francisco Superior Court.

Anyone with information about the robbery Saturday is encouraged to call the Police Department's anonymous tip line at (415) 575-4444 or send a tip by text message to TIP411.

 

Oakland Leaders Unveil New Police and Fire Communication System

City of Oakland officials unveiled a new police and fire communications system Monday that they believe will minimize radio problems that interfered with operations earlier this year.

Mayor Jean Quan, who was joined by City Administrator Lamont Ewell, Interim Fire Chief Mark Hoffmann and other officials at a news conference at Highland Hospital, said the new system offers more streamlined communications operations for first responders in the field and fewer dead spots than the old and outdated system it is replacing.

The new system complies with national standards for digital radio communications, which are called Project 25, or P25 for short, Quan said.

The previous system was analog. She said Oakland is the first city in the Bay Area to be fully compliant with P25 standards.

The new system cost about $18 million but it was paid for by federal funds, according to Quan.

There were several incidents earlier this year in which problems with the radio communication system prevented police officers who were responding to serious crimes from talking to one another or dispatchers for long periods of time.

The problems also hampered communications for the Oakland Fire Department.

The problems were so bad that at one point Police Chief Anthony Batts had officers ride two per patrol car as a safety measure. Generally, patrol officers ride alone, which allows more cars to be available to respond to crimes.

When officers double up, there are fewer patrol cars on the streets. Batts said he wanted to make sure that officers could back each other up until the communications system issues were resolved.

Quan had previously said the new system might not be ready until the end of the summer, and she said she is pleased that it is now in place.

It started operating on Sunday morning.

The system was tested for a month before it began operating, she said.

 

Weather Forecast

The Bay Area is expected to be mostly cloudy this morning, becoming partly cloudy, with highs in the upper 50s.

It is expected to be mostly clear this evening, becoming mostly cloudy, with lows in the lower 50s.

West winds of 15 to 20 mph are also expected. Wednesday is expected to be mostly cloudy with highs in the upper 50s and southwest winds of 10 to 15 mph.

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Firefighters Battle Warehouse Fire Monday Evening

Firefighters responded to a fire at a warehouse in San Francisco Monday evening, a fire dispatcher said.

The one-alarm blaze was reported at 5:52 p.m. at a commercial warehouse at 2200 Cesar Chavez and responders extinguished the blaze by 6:46 p.m., the dispatcher said.

No injuries were reported and the cause of the fire is under investigation.

CONTACT: San Francisco fire (415) 558-3268

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June 8, 2011

Just how closely were tech startups paying attention to LinkedIn's initial IPO last month?


Drivers will face more changes on Market Street as part of an effort to speed transit and make the street more accommodating to bicyclists and pedestrians. Encouraged by the effect of limits on Mid-Market Street, where...

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June 9, 2011

A man shot and killed by San Francisco police Tuesday evening was a robber who became known as the "Gen X bandit" because of his distinctive attire while holding up two banks in Orange County, authorities said Wednesday....

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