SF News

Caltrans, CHP Crews Picking Up Litter in Cleanup Day

A massive litter cleanup is under way today on highways throughout the Bay Area, a Caltrans spokesman said.

Caltrans and California Highway Patrol crews will be at four locations picking up trash as part of the 10th annual Litter Cleanup and Enforcement Day, Caltrans spokesman Adam Priest said.

A total of roughly 40 crewmembers will participate in the cleanup, which is a way to let Bay Area residents know that trash buildup on highways "is an issue that we need to bring attention to," Priest said.

In San Jose, the cleanup was scheduled to begin at 9 a.m. along U.S. Highway 101. Crews are picking up trash between Interstate Highway 280 and state Highway 237.

A second cleanup is taking place throughout the morning farther north on Highway 101, between the Sierra Point Parkway exit in Brisbane and the Candlestick Park exit in San Francisco.

In the Oakland-Alameda area, crews are removing litter from Doolittle Drive between Hegenberger Road and Island Drive.

The final cleanup is taking place in Marin County on Highway 101 between Tiburon Boulevard and Tamalpais Drive in Corte Madera, and over the Alto Hill, Priest said.

Priest said that in addition to the annual one-day event, smaller cleanups are done quarterly.

Anyone who wants to help remove litter from highways can do so through Caltrans' Adopt-a-Highway program. More information about the program can be found at www.dot.ca.gov.

 

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16-Year-Old Fremont Girl Kidnapped by Man in Car

A 16-year-old girl was allegedly kidnapped by a man who had broken into her car and hid in an attempt to sexually assault her after she went to a Fremont grocery store Monday morning, according to police.

The victim parked her car to go to the Lucky Supermarket at the Brookvale Shopping Center, located in the 3500 block of Fremont Boulevard, just before 7 a.m.

While she was in the store, allegedly Aron Kumar Roy, a 23-year-old Fremont man, got into her car and hid in the backseat, police said.

When the victim returned and started driving off, Roy allegedly produced a knife and began giving the girl instructions to drive to a remote location near Isherwood Way and Chaplin Drive, police said.

It appears he was attempting to rape the victim, according to police.

The victim parked the car and was able to escape and run to a home where a resident called the police.

The resident also activated the panic button as part of her home's alarm system, police said.

Officers responded to the area and found the victim's vehicle sitting on Isherwood Way and identified the suspect as Roy.

He was found at his workplace in the 4800 block of Dublin Boulevard in Dublin around 6 p.m. that night, police said.

Roy was booked into the Fremont Jail on six charges, including kidnapping, kidnapping with the intent to commit rape, assault with a deadly weapon, and false imprisonment.

He is to be arraigned today at the Fremont Hall of Justice, according to jail records.

 

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Power Outage in SoMa

More than 2,200 PG&E customers were without power in San Francisco's South of Market area after a bird flew into power lines there, a utility spokesman said.

Power was knocked out to 2,207 customers around 3:45 p.m. when a bird made contact with two power lines near Bryant and Alameda streets, PG&E spokesman Joe Molica said.

All but 223 customers had their power restored shortly after 5 p.m.

The remaining impacted customers should have power back shortly thereafter, Molica said.

The bird died in the incident, he said.

 

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San Francisco Bay Area Wednesday Morning News Roundup

Santa Clara: 49ers Stadium Construction Suspended Until Thursday After Death of Elevator Worker

The general contractor of San Francisco 49ers' new stadium in Santa Clara Tuesday suspended construction until Thursday after a worker was killed in an elevator accident at the site, a spokesman said.

Building on the project will resume at 6:45 a.m. after "we talk to our 1,200 employees about the tragic day," said Robert Rayborn, project co-director with general contractor Turner-Devcon.

Rayborn said that based on what people said in a flood of calls and emails about the victim, Donald White, "he was such a committed person that he would want us to go on, so we decided on Thursday as a good day."

The contractor made the decision after the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health, which is investigating the accident, said Tuesday afternoon it was up to them when to resume construction, Rayborn said.

The accident was reported at 6:53 a.m. at the site of what will be Levi's Stadium, the $1.3 billion venue at Centennial Boulevard and Tasman Drive slated to open in 2014.

Rayborn said that White was an employee of subcontractor Schindler Elevator Corp. and a 43-year veteran in the elevator trades with a wife and four sons.

White, 63, was apparently standing on a ladder beneath the elevator's counterweight when the counterweight "came down and struck him," said Peter Melton, a spokesman for Cal/OSHA.

Melton said it is not yet clear what went wrong.

Greg Siggins, a spokesman for Cal/OSHA, said the agency would determine what if any state safety code violations occurred during the accident and complete a report within six months, as state law requires.

Cal/OSHA is reviewing information provided by the West Coast regional operating manager for Schindler, which as White's employer could be cited and fined if code violations are found, Siggins said.

Companies may be fined $7,000 for general and regulatory violations, $25,000 for a serious violation and from $5,000 to $70,000 for a willful violation of occupational safety codes, Siggins said.

The investigation will look into whether Schindler's employees were properly trained to operate equipment and wore proper gear while working, Siggins said.

Siggins said he did not know whether White was wearing a helmet or if the man was killed at a temporary or stadium elevator.

Rayborn said the accident occurred in one of 14 elevator shafts at the stadium site.

After the accident, work on the stadium was stopped and workers were sent home.

Project co-director Jonathan Harvey said safety is the company's primary concern.

"We will never put a worker in a hazardous situation," he said. 

Oakland: East Bay Water Rates to Increase by Nearly 20 Percent

East Bay Municipal Utility District directors voted 5-2 Tuesday to increase customers' water rates by 19.25 percent over the next two years to pay for infrastructure and maintenance work.

The rate hike calls for the typical single-family EBMUD customer to pay an extra $8.15 a month in water rates over the next two years and see their monthly bill rise from $40.45 to $48.60 over that time span.

And they come on top of water rate increases that have totaled 12 percent in the past two years that the water agency has imposed on its 1.3 million customers in Alameda and Contra Costa counties.

Most of the 17 customers who spoke at Tuesday's board meeting oppose the rate hike, saying it's too steep.

But a majority of board members said the 90-year-old water agency needs to raise its rates again to help pay for infrastructure and maintenance work, such as replacing aging pipes and other equipment, that's been deferred during the economic downturn in recent years.

Referring to the infrastructure and maintenance work, Director William Patterson said, "You can only put it off so long. Our number one priority is our infrastructure and we're here to do out best for our ratepayers." 

Director Lesa McIntosh said, "We don't take this (the water rate increase) lightly, but we've been limping along quite a while. I know it's painful but I think it's necessary."

Director Doug Linney said, "Nobody likes to increase rates" but he said that even with the increase EBMUD's rates are still lower than most water agencies in the Bay Area.

Director Frank Mellon said, "If we don't do this now, the cost later on will be so much more. It's my fiduciary responsibility to support this."

The board's vote means that water rates will increase by 9.75 percent on July 1, when the new fiscal year begins, and by another 9.5 percent on July 1, 2014.

It also means that wastewater rates will rise by 9 percent on July 1 and by another 8.5 percent on July 1, 2014.

Before the board voted, EBMUD finance director Eric Sandler said the water agency faces fiscal challenges from the drought and the economic recession, such as reduced sales volumes, capacity charges revenues and interest earnings.

Sandler said some of the strategies that EBMUD has used to mitigate its financial challenges, such as increasing its maintenance backlog, letting its infrastructure age and risking its AAA credit rating, are no longer sustainable.

BART Calls For State Mediator to Assist With Contract Negotiations

BART management has requested assistance from a state mediator because of stalled contract negotiations with its labor unions, the transit agency announced Tuesday.

Contracts between BART and several unions that represent more than 2,400 employees expire on June 30, and both sides are pushing for a compromise over wages and health benefits.

The unions involved in the negotiations include Service Employees International Union Local 1021, Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1555, and American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees Local 3993.

The transit agency Tuesday issued a statement confirming that BART management is asking for the assistance of a state mediator to "bridge a large gap in negotiations."

The unions represent maintenance workers, mechanics, operators, station agents, supervisors and mid-level managers.

Antioch: Elderly Man Beat and Robbed Last Month Dies

An elderly man who was beaten during a robbery in Antioch last month died of his injuries Tuesday, according to the Contra Costa County coroner's bureau.

Patrick Chang, 83, died late Tuesday morning at John Muir Medical Center in Walnut Creek, according to the coroner's office.

Chang was in critical condition after a juvenile allegedly beat and robbed him in the parking lot of an Orchard Hardware Supply store at 4873 Lone Tree Way on May 18, police said.

Police did not locate the suspect after the incident and released surveillance photographs showing a male near the scene, police said.

On May 23 a suspect was booked in to Juvenile Hall in Martinez on suspicion of felony assault and robbery, police said.

Police did not say if the juvenile was the male shown in the photographs.

SF: Proposal Would Improve Work Flexibility for Families

Employees in San Francisco who are parents or caregivers could soon have the right to request a more flexible and predictable work schedule via legislation proposed Tuesday at the city's Board of Supervisors meeting.

The legislation was introduced by board president David Chiu and would go in front of voters on the city's ballot this November if the supervisors approve it.

Under the proposal, employees with parental or caregiver responsibilities would have the right to request the different work schedules.

Employers would then be required to respond in writing outlining "undue hardship" reasons if they decided to deny a request.

The law would be enforced by the city's Office of Labor Standards Enforcement, which would handle any appeals or disputes between employee and employer.

Chiu said the legislation was a response to changing social mores that have seen an increasing number of families with two working parents or a single parent in recent decades.

San Francisco also has seen many families flee the city -- only 13.5 percent of its residents are children, the lowest percentage of any major city in the country, Chiu said.

He said similar laws have been passed in the U.K., Ireland, Australia and New Zealand and "have increased worker satisfaction, loyalty and productivity."

Supervisor Eric Mar, a co-sponsor of the legislation, said he is a father and understands the need to work flexible hours.

Mar said along with helping to keep families in the city, the legislation would help to decrease traffic by reducing the number of car trips during peak commute hours.

He said the ordinance could be an example "that will be followed by many other cities."

However, the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce is already voicing opposition to the proposal because of its potential impact to the city's business community.

Chamber president Bob Linscheid said Chiu did not reach out to the business advocacy group before announcing the legislation.

"We were a little bit surprised," Linscheid said. He said "our companies in San Francisco already do a pretty good job of providing flexible hours" and that the legislation "doesn't send the right message to the business community."

Mayor Ed Lee said he understood the concerns of both the business and labor advocates and said he would wait until seeing a final version of the legislation before forming an opinion because "the devil's in the details."

Chiu said he looked forward to discussing the legislation with the various stakeholders and noted that businesses with under 10 employees would be exempt, as would employees who have not worked for a company for at least six months. 

East Palo Alto: Police Chief Declares End to 'Crime Emergency'

East Palo Alto Police Chief Ron Davis on Monday called an end to a three-week crime emergency he declared in response to a sudden increase in gang violence.

Since the emergency went into effect on May 20, there has been only one shooting reported in East Palo Alto, which police said was accidental and self-inflicted.

"The Crime Emergency has ended, but our sense of urgency and resolve in stemming violence in our community has not," Davis said in a statement.

The number of patrol officers deployed throughout the community during peak hours -- which doubled during the crime emergency -- will return to prior levels.

The Police Department pledged to continue fighting gang activity in the community by coordinating prevention efforts with neighboring law enforcement agencies, faith-based organizations, local probation departments and service providers, Davis said.

Overall, crime in East Palo Alto has decreased by 15 percent compared to this time last year, according to statistics released by the Police Department.

A recent increase in homicides and shootings -- including a May 5 shooting at a bus stop that injured a six-year-old girl, her grandmother and four others -- was attributed to an internal feud in the Norteno gang.

The fatal shooting of 15-year-old Jose Quinonez on May 19 was believed to be connected to the same street gang.

Police have since arrested 27 people in East Palo Alto and San Mateo County and part of its gang crackdown, at least 10 of which were known members of the Nortenos, officials said.

Davis said that violence prevention efforts will continue "with a renewed sense of urgency," and that the department hopes to achieve the "bold goal" of no more murders for the remainder of 2013. 

SJ: DA: 39 of 48 People Indicted for Alleged Gang Activity in Custody

All but nine of 48 alleged members or associates of the Nuestra Familia criminal gang indicted in May are in custody in the largest gang prosecution ever in Santa Clara County, the district attorney's office said Tuesday.

One San Jose-based associate of the Nuestra Familia, Mario "Green Eyes" Soria, was arrested Tuesday on gang participation and methamphetamine sales charges, District Attorney Jeff Rosen said at a news conference in San Jose.

Rosen announced that a Santa Clara County criminal grand jury had indicted the 48 Nuestra Familia gang members or associates on 77 felony counts including murder, robbery, drug sales, witness intimidation and weapons violations.

A three-year probe into the gang's activities in the county, involving more than a dozen federal, state and local law enforcement agencies, ended May 30 when the grand jury handed down the indictments, Rosen said.

"We began in 2010 and we were able to bring charges against more and more defendants until finally you have the largest gang indictment in the history of our county," Rosen said.

The district attorney's office is prepared to prosecute the extensive number of defendants by using a special courtroom, Department 54 in the county's Hall of Justice in San Jose, that is able to try multi-defendant cases, Rosen said.

Prosecutors also expect that some of those charged will agree to plea deals to avoid trials, he said.

"We believe that as this prosecution goes forward, certain individuals will plead guilty and whittle down the number eventually left for trial."

"Sometimes when there are a dozen or more defendants left for trial, we may split it up into two trials, depending on what the evidence is, without going to a stadium to do it," Rosen said.

However, Rosen said the cases would take "many, many months to prosecute."

Nuestra Familia is a violent street gang that has operated out of prisons in California going back to the 1960s, according to the district attorney's office.

Of the 48 people indicted, 38 are men and 10 are women, 23 are believed to be full-fledged members of Nuestra Familia in the county and 25 are suspected associates of the group, the district attorney's office said.

Two alleged members, Juan "Rico" or "Juanito" Carrasco and Jose Luis "Looney" Garcia, and seven associates of Nuestra Familia remain at large, Rosen said.

According to the indictment, "All 48 defendants and others, on or about and between June 10, 2010, and May 30, 2013, sold methamphetamine in association with the Nuestra Familia street regiment."

The 77 felony crimes listed also include a series of five robberies of banks and credit unions in San Jose in which six defendants got away with $60,000 from late 2011 to early 2012, according to prosecutors.

For instance, the indictment charges defendant Martha Frances Castro with allegedly using a fake bomb to threaten employees and steal cash from the Alliance Federal Credit Union on Snell Avenue on Dec. 29, 2011.

Larry "Conejo" Lucero, who like Castro is in custody, is considered the leader of what prosecutors call the Nuestra Familia's "Santa Clara County Regiment" of made gang members.

Lucero oversaw 12 gang members from the so-called San Jose Regiment, six from the Gilroy Regiment and four from the San Jose Federal Regiment, prosecutors said.

Members of in the federal regiment are in custody in federal prison while the others are in state prisons or still on the street, Rosen said.

Of the Nuestra Familia associates named in the indictment, 20 are affiliated with the San Jose regiment and five with the Gilroy group.

All four members of the federal regiment, Rubin Cruz, Angel Martinez, Alberto Jose "Bird" Larez and Josef Ryan Oaks, are named in the indictment for the murder of Martin Chacon, 38, who was shot to death in San Jose on Aug. 13, 2012, while he sat in his car.

Nuestra Familia's members are predominantly in California, but some may be in other Western states, Rosen said.

SF: Court Says Robber Has No Right of Privacy Against GPS Search of Stolen Phone

A person who steals a cellphone doesn't have a privacy right that would prevent police from using global positioning to find the phone and arrest him, a state appeals court ruled in San Francisco Tuesday.

A three-judge panel of the Court of Appeal unanimously upheld the conviction of Lorenzo Barnes and sentence of 13 years and eight months in prison for a 2009 armed robbery in San Francisco.

According to the ruling, Barnes stole a purse from Carolyn Fey and a wallet from Charles Parce after brandishing a handgun at them as they walked near Fort Mason in San Francisco shortly after midnight on Nov. 5, 2009.

Fey's handbag contained her cellphone, and after she told police the phone had a global positioning system, an officer contacted the Sprint PCS phone service, arranged for Fey to sign a release, and then asked Sprint to ping the phone.

On the basis of several pings by Sprint, two officers followed Barnes for several blocks in the Mission District and with the help of a third officer stopped him in a car in a car at 13th and Mission streets about one hour after the robbery.

The officers arrested Barnes after seeing a cellphone on the front seat of the car and a handbag on the back seat that matched the description of Fey's turquoise Prada purse, and after Fey was brought to the scene and identified him as the suspect.

Barnes later pleaded guilty in San Francisco Superior Court to two counts of second-degree armed robbery and one count of being a previously convicted felon in possession of a handgun, and was sentenced to 13 years and eight months in prison.

But he reserved the right to appeal his claim that the phone pinging carried out without a search warrant violated his expectation of privacy under the U.S. Constitution's Fourth Amendment ban on unreasonable search and seizures.

The appeals court said, however, that there is no right to privacy in stolen property.

"Did defendant have a legitimate expectation of privacy in the cellphone he had stolen?

The answer is an emphatic 'no,'" Justice James Richman wrote in the court's decision.

Richman cited a 2005 decision in which the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said, "The Fourth Amendment does not protect a defendant from a warrantless search of property that he stole."

Richman also noted that the arrest was based on a combination of the cellphone pinging and the victims' description of the stolen purse and the suspect.

That information taken together provided the officers with "ample reasonable suspicion for a detention," the appeals court said. 

Salinas: Woman Arrested in Gang Murder of 14-Year-Old Boy, Police Seek Second Suspect

A Salinas woman was arrested Tuesday morning on suspicion of the gang-related stabbing death of a 14-year-old boy, but another suspect remains at-large, a police spokesman said.

Leslie Denise Rico, 23, turned herself in at the Salinas Police Department at 10:37 a.m. after seeing her photo distributed by police in the May 17 stabbing of Ricardo Ruiz, Officer Miguel Cabrera said.

Rico was arrested on suspicion of homicide, a street gang enhancement and attempted carjacking, Cabrera said.

Police are still searching for a second suspect in Ruiz's slaying, Angela Zuniga, 21, a resident of King City, Cabrera said.

Ruiz was stabbed in the neck after answering a question about his street gang affiliation allegedly posed by Zuniga, Cabrera said.

"It's a gang-related homicide," he said.

"The motive involved was a challenge about what his gang affiliation was."

The boy was transported by a citizen to a hospital and later died after his family decided to take him off life-support, Cabrera said.

Police released photos of Rico and Zuniga after the fatal stabbing, Cabrera said.

The two major street gangs operating in Salinas are the Surenos and Nortenos, Cabrera said.

Anyone with information about Zuniga's whereabouts is urged to contact Salinas police at (831) 758-7134 or (831) 758-7322.

Those who want to remain anonymous may phone the crime tip line at (831) 775-4222 or the "WeTip" line at 1-800-78-CRIME. 

SF: Airbnb, Other Companies Partnering With City in Emergency Preparedness

In the event of a natural disaster or another type of emergency, companies like Airbnb that are part of San Francisco's "sharing economy" will assist the city in accommodating residents who are displaced or need other assistance, Mayor Ed Lee announced Tuesday.

Lee and other city officials met Tuesday with various companies in a growing industry that specializes in sharing assets like living spaces, cars, bikes and skills through the use of social media and other technology.

The companies, which include Airbnb, Zipcar, City CarShare and others, will help link people interested in helping out after a disaster to those in need of assistance.

"I think there will be a lot of people that want to help, and they just need that medium," the mayor said.

Lee and other officials cited the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy as an example of how "sharing economy" companies can be helpful.

Nate Blecharczyk, founder of Airbnb, said last October's storm that hit New York City and other populated areas on the East Coast led to many of the company's customers changing their profiles to offer empty rooms for free to displaced residents.

Airbnb was eventually able to temporarily waive its service fees for residents following the storm and made more than 1,400 homes available for free through their website for New York City residents, Blecharczyk said.

"It's fundamentally changed how our system worked," he said.

"If we had been a little bit more prepared, we could've done so much more."

The company now has a tool in place that can be activated in less than 30 minutes in an area where a disaster has struck to waive the service fees and allow people to offer rooms for free, Blecharczyk said.

Mayor Lee also invited BayShare, an advocacy group for the city's "sharing economy" companies, to join its Disaster Council.

The council includes key city officials and private sector organizations and meets four times per year to share information about emergency planning activities.

"We are excited to work with the city by sharing our skills and evolving social infrastructure to contribute to a more connected Bay Area community and a resilient city in the event of a disaster," BayShare executive director Milicent Johnson said. 

Antioch: 21-Year-Old Man Fatally Shot

A 21-year-old man was fatally shot this morning in Antioch, according to police.

Police received a report of a shooting in the 1900 block of D Street, near Fremont Elementary School and Antioch High School at about 12:26 a.m.

Upon arrival, officers found a 21-year-old Antioch man with a gunshot wound.

Medical personnel and police officers took life-saving measures, but the victim was later pronounced dead at a local hospital, according to police.

The Antioch Police Department Investigations Bureau is continuing to investigate the homicide and identify suspects, police said.

Weather Forecast for the San Francisco Bay Area

Sunny skies are likely in the Bay Area this morning.

Highs are expected to be in the 50s to upper 60s, with westerly winds up to 30 mph.

Mostly clear skies are likely this evening.

Lows are likely to be in the upper 40s to mid 50s, with westerly winds up to 30 mph.

Sunny skies are expected Thursday morning.

Highs are expected to be in the upper 50s to lower 70s, with westerly winds up to 20 mph.

 

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San Francisco Robber Has No Right of Privacy on Stolen Phone

A person who steals a cellphone doesn't have a privacy right that would prevent police from using global positioning to find the phone and arrest him, a state appeals court ruled in San Francisco today.

A three-judge panel of the Court of Appeal unanimously upheld the conviction of Lorenzo Barnes and sentence of 13 years and eight months in prison for a 2009 armed robbery in San Francisco

According to the ruling, Barnes stole a purse from Carolyn Fey and a wallet from Charles Parce after brandishing a handgun at them as they walked near Fort Mason in San Francisco shortly after midnight on Nov. 5, 2009.

Fey's handbag contained her cellphone, and after she told police the phone had a global positioning system, an officer contacted the Sprint PCS phone service, arranged for Fey to sign a release, and then asked Sprint to ping the phone.

On the basis of several pings by Sprint, two officers followed Barnes for several blocks in the Mission District and with the help of a third officer stopped him in a car in a car at 13th and Mission streets about one hour after the robbery.

The officers arrested Barnes after seeing a cellphone on the front seat of the car and a handbag on the back seat that matched the description of Fey's turquoise Prada purse, and after Fey was brought to the scene and identified him as the suspect.

Barnes later pleaded guilty in San Francisco Superior Court to two counts of second-degree armed robbery and one count of being a previously convicted felon in possession of a handgun, and was sentenced to 13 years and eight months in prison.  

But he reserved the right to appeal his claim that the phone pinging carried out without a search warrant violated his expectation of privacy under the U.S. Constitution's Fourth Amendment ban on unreasonable search and seizures.

The appeals court said, however, that there is no right to privacy in stolen property. "Did defendant have a legitimate expectation of privacy in the cellphone he had stolen? The answer is an emphatic 'no,'" Justice James Richman wrote in the court's decision.

Richman cited a 2005 decision in which the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said, "The Fourth Amendment does not protect a defendant from a warrantless search of property that he stole."

Richman also noted that the arrest was based on a combination of the cellphone pinging and the victims' description of the stolen purse and the suspect.

That information taken together provided the officers with "ample reasonable suspicion for a detention," the appeals court said.

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Napa Police Arrest Prowler in Possession of Meth Tuesday

Police arrested a prowler in possession of methamphetamine early Tuesday morning after a resident saw him peering into his home and tackled him, police said. 

At 12:09 a.m. Tuesday, officers received a report of someone trying to break into a van in the 2500 block of Indiana Street. The suspect was described to police as wearing a black shirt, blue jeans, and sneakers. He was about 6 feet tall and had a shaved head, police said.

Officers searched the area but were unable to locate the suspect. Then, at 12:31 a.m., officers were dispatched to a home in the 100 block of Cherryview Court, about half a mile from where the attempted auto burglary occurred, after receiving a report of a burglary suspect who had been detained by a resident in the home's yard.

Officers found a resident standing over the suspect, who was later identified as 32-year-old Napa resident Matthew Steven Allen, police said.

Allen matched the description of the person who had tried to burglarize the van, police said.

Police took Allen into custody and searched him, and found a substance believed to be methamphetamine. Hypodermic needles were found in his jeans pocket, police said.

The resident who detained Allen told police he was asleep when his dog began to bark downstairs. His wife went downstairs and saw someone in the backyard.

Allen was standing inches from the back door looking into the home, according to police.

The resident opened the door and tackled Allen to the ground and held him there until officers arrived, police said. The victim told police he had never seen Allen before.

Allen was arrested for possession of a controlled substance, being under the influence of a controlled substance, violation of probation and prowling, police said.

 

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Police Searching for Sexual Assault Suspect at Berkeley Marina

Police are continuing to search for a man who sexually assaulted a child in a restroom at the Berkeley Marina this afternoon, police said.

The assault was reported at 1:37 p.m. when a caller told police that a man had sexually assaulted the child in a public restroom.

Police contained the marina and checked all cars leaving the area for the suspect from posts on University Avenue and Marina Boulevard.

Meanwhile, East Bay Regional Parks police searched the area from a helicopter while Berkeley police searched on foot, motorcycles, bicycles, dirt bikes and in patrol cars with assistance from the parks police and the Department of Fish and Game.

As of tonight the suspect had not been found and police are continuing their search, according to Berkeley police.

 

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Man Dies in McLaren Park Crash

A man was killed when his car crashed into a tree in San Francisco's McLaren Park on Monday evening, police said today.

The crash was reported at 5:37 p.m. Monday near Mansell Street and John F. Shelley Drive.

Someone nearby heard the accident and found that the 39-year-old victim had crashed a Mazda MPV minivan into a tree and had been partially ejected out of the driver's side window, according to police.

The man was taken to San Francisco General Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. His name has not yet been released by the medical examiner's office.

The vehicle was traveling east on John F. Shelley Drive when the crash happened, police spokeswoman Officer Tracy Turner said.

Turner said there was no indication that alcohol or drugs played a role in the crash.

 

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Proposal Would Improve Work Flexibility for San Francisco Families

Employees in San Francisco who are parents or caregivers could soon have the right to request a more flexible and predictable work schedule via legislation proposed today at the city's Board of Supervisors meeting.

The legislation was introduced by board president and would go in front of voters on the city's ballot this November if the supervisors approve it.

Under the proposal, employees with parental or caregiver responsibilities would have the right to request the different work schedules. Employers would then be required to respond in writing outlining "undue hardship" reasons if they decided to deny a request.

The law would be enforced by the city's Office of Labor Standards Enforcement, which would handle any appeals or disputes between employee and employer.

Chiu said the legislation was a response to changing social mores that have seen an increasing number of families with two working parents or a single parent in recent decades.

San Francisco also has seen many families flee the city -- only 13.5 percent of its residents are children, the lowest percentage of any major city in the country, Chiu said. He said similar laws have been passed in the U.K., Ireland, Australia and New Zealand and "have increased worker satisfaction, loyalty and productivity."

Supervisor Eric Mar, a co-sponsor of the legislation, said he is a father and understands the need to work flexible hours. Mar said along with helping to keep families in the city, the legislation would help to decrease traffic by reducing the number of car trips during peak commute hours. He said the ordinance could be an example "that will be followed by many other cities."

However, the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce is already voicing opposition to the proposal because of its potential impact to the city's business community. Chamber president Bob Linscheid said Chiu did not reach out to the business advocacy group before announcing the legislation. "We were a little bit surprised," Linscheid said. He said "our companies in San Francisco already do a pretty good job of providing flexible hours" and that the legislation "doesn't send the right message to the business community."

Mayor Ed Lee said he understood the concerns of both the business and labor advocates and said he would wait until seeing a final version of the legislation before forming an opinion because "the devil's in the details."

Chiu said he looked forward to discussing the legislation with the various stakeholders and noted that businesses with under 10 employees would be exempt, as would employees who have not worked for a company for at least six months.

Kelly Dwyer, who is pregnant and already has a 3-year-old child, said she was in favor of the proposal. "Having this option would really benefit families who shouldn't have to choose between staying home or going to work," Dwyer said.

If the proposal will go in front of voters in November, the full board will have to vote by its July 30 meeting to put it on the ballot, according to Chiu's office.

 

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2-Alarm Residential Fire in Bayview This Morning

Firefighters are battling a second-alarm fire at a residence in San Francisco's Bayview district, according to fire officials.

The fire, at a home located in the 1500 block of Hudson Avenue, about one block from Third Street, was reported at about 2:30 a.m., fire officials said.

No injuries have been reported and the cause of the fire remains under investigation, fire officials said.

San Francisco Bay Area Tuesday Morning News Roundup

SJ: DA to Discuss 77-Count Indictment of 48 People in Criminal Gang Case

Santa Clara County District Attorney Jeff Rosen will announce indictments today of 39 male and nine female defendants in a criminal gang case involving alleged murder, robbery, drug sales and weapons charges, a supervising district attorney said.

Rosen will be taking about the wide-ranging, 77-count indictment during an hour-long news conference at 10:30 a.m. at the district attorney's office, 70 W. Hedding St. in San Jose.

"Jeff is going to talk about the specifics and the significance of the case itself," Supervising District Attorney Lance Daugherty said.

The indictment alleges the 48 defendants took part in the Nuestra Familia criminal gang organization in Santa Clara County from 2010 to May 30 and conspired to sell methamphetamine, according to the indictment.

The charges were handed down following testimony from 84 witnesses before the Santa Clara County grand jury.

Renee Hessling, defense attorney for two men charged in the indictment, said it was hard to imagine 48 people in one criminal case, which she quipped would have to be heard "in the HP Pavilion."

"This has never been done in this county before," Hessling said. "I think it's politically charged. They want to take charge against gangs."

Instead of holding many hearings that could take years, the district attorney likely wants to strike deals where the defendants plead guilty to gang charges that would stay with them for life, Hessling said.

According to the 47-page indictment, the Nuestra Familia's activities began prior to June 10, 2010, when gang member Martin Vasquez "Cycs" Martinez was arrested and handed over control to his brother, Angel Kiko "Young Buck" Martinez.

Angel Martinez "established street regiments" in the county to further criminal acts by the gang, according to the indictment.

Sometime after Jan. 1, 2011, Nuestra Familia gang member Antonio "Sombra" Villagrana assigned Luis "Wicked" Barrios, just released from Corcoran State Prison, to operate out of Gilroy.

In November 2011, a Nuestra Familia cohort, Larry James "Conejo" Lucero, got out of prison, took over the gang from Barrios and with Villagrana, Martin Martinez and George "Creeper" Pacheco ran the group's crime activities.

The grand jury charged Lucero, the Martinez brothers, Pacheco and two others with conspiracy to sell cocaine during the period.

Pacheco and five defendants are listed as accused of 15 other crimes in the armed robberies of branches of the Postal Credit Union, US Bank, Alliance Federal Credit Union, Chase Bank, Bank of the West and Bank of America, all in San Jose.

In one case, on Dec. 29, 2011, defendant Martha Frances Castro allegedly entered the Alliance Federal Credit Union on Snell Avenue with a fake bomb and used it to threaten employees and obtain cash from them.

Luis Barrios allegedly also used a phony explosive on Jan. 12, 2012, to intimidate workers during a robbery of the Bank of America on Snell Avenue, the indictment reported.

Castro, Pacheco and others are also charged with second-degree robbery for allegedly demanding that bank and credit union tellers turn over their personal property during the robberies.

Other alleged crimes perpetrated by the gang included making criminal threats.

Oakland: Doctors Say Oikos Shooting Suspect is Still Mentally Incompetent

Doctors believe a man accused of murdering seven people in a shooting rampage at Oakland's Oikos University in April 2012 is still mentally incompetent to stand trial, his lawyer told a judge Monday.

One Goh, 44, didn't attend his brief hearing in Alameda County Superior Court in Oakland because he's still being treated at Napa State Hospital, where he was sent earlier this year after a judge ruled on Jan. 7 that he's not competent to stand trial and suspended the legal proceedings against him.

Judge Jon Rolefson ordered that Goh return to court on Dec. 9 for another update on his mental competency.

Goh, a Korean national who lived in Oakland, is charged with seven counts of murder, three counts of attempted murder for allegedly shooting three victims who survived, and 10 special-circumstance allegations including committing murder during a carjacking.

Oakland police said that Goh fled the campus after the April 2, 2012, shootings in a car belonging to one of the victims.

He was arrested in Alameda a short time later after he confessed to a Safeway security guard that he had just shot several people, according to police.

The goal for Goh's treatment at the Napa State Hospital is for him to progress toward recovering his mental competence so he eventually can stand trial.

After the hearing for Goh Monday, his attorney, David Klaus, said psychiatrists who have examined Goh recently still believe he's mentally incompetent and is "not close" to being ready to stand trial.

Klaus said Goh is taking the antipsychotic drug perphenazine and is participating in group therapy sessions.

Klaus said Goh lost about 60 pounds while he was in the Alameda County jail because he was depressed and "was paranoid about his food" but is now eating three times a day at the Napa State Hospital and "looked healthy" when he visited him recently.

Killed in the shooting at Oikos last year were students Lydia Sim, 21, Sonam Choedon, 33, Grace Kim, 23, Doris Chibuko, 40, Judith Seymour, 53, and Tshering Bhutia, 38, as well as Katleen Ping, 24, who worked at the school.

Klaus' comments about Goh's health during an interview with reporters in a courthouse hallway upset Chibuko's husband, Efanye Chibuko, 43, who said, "I lost my wife that day and my kids lost their mom."

Chibuko said he believes that Goh "is taking advantage of the system" because he doesn't think Goh is mentally incompetent.

Referring to the shooting, Chibuko said Goh "did it and planned it and eventually it will catch up to him." 

Windsor: Woman Stabbed by Boyfriend Who Died in Confrontation with Police Out of Hospital

A 60-year-old Windsor woman who was stabbed by her estranged boyfriend in the Windsor Town Green Saturday morning has been released from a hospital, a Santa Rosa police captain said Monday afternoon.

Her boyfriend, 48-year-old Urbano Moreno Morales, was shot and killed after the stabbing around 7:30 a.m. Saturday in a confrontation with two Sonoma County sheriff's deputies assigned to the Windsor Police Department.

Their names have not been released, but they are on paid administrative leave.

An autopsy on Morales was scheduled for Monday.

The Santa Rosa Police Department is investigating the officer involved shooting, but the sheriff's office said Monday Morales was at the victim's northeast Windsor house twice in the hours before the woman was stabbed and he was killed.

Morales and the stabbing victim had "relationship issues" and he moved out of the residence in May, Assistant Sonoma County Sheriff Lorenzo Duenas said.

Windsor deputies arrested Morales at 11:07 p.m. Friday at the woman's home for being drunk in public, Duenas said.

"He tried to get inside the house," Duenas said.

Morales was booked in the Sonoma County jail on the misdemeanor drunk in public charge but posted bail around 4 a.m. and was released, Duenas said.

Windsor deputies returned to the woman's home when Morales again tried to get inside around 4:51 a.m. Saturday, Duenas said.

"He was returning for his car but didn't have the key," Duenas said.

The deputies gave Morales a ride to his family's house in the Santa Rosa area.

Then at around 7:30 a.m., Morales stabbed the woman at the Starbucks at 1001 McClelland Drive on the Town Green, according to Santa Rosa police.

Morales stabbed himself as he ran from the first deputy he encountered, Santa Rosa police Capt. Craig Schwartz said.

Near the Windsor Police Department, deputies ordered him in English and Spanish to drop the knife, and one deputy shot him with a Taser.

The Taser was ineffective, Morales ignored the deputies' commands and charged them with a knife, Schwartz said.

Morales was hit by one or more bullets when the deputies fired at Morales, who was pronounced dead at the scene at 7:38 a.m., Schwartz said.

Morales and the stabbing victim had an adult child together, Schwartz said. 

Bay Area Clerks' Offices Prepare for Supreme Court Decision on Proposition 8

With the U.S. Supreme Court expected to make a ruling this month on California's ban on same-sex marriage, county clerks' offices around the Bay Area are preparing to accommodate a potential influx of gay and lesbian couples lining up to tie the knot should Proposition 8 be overturned.

At San Francisco City Hall, where thousands of same-sex weddings took place when then-Mayor Gavin Newsom first allowed them in 2004 and again in 2008 when such unions were briefly legal statewide, dozens of volunteers are being trained to supplement regular office staff who process marriage licenses and officiate weddings, said Bill Barnes, a project manager in the San Francisco City Administrator's Office.

Barnes said the clerk's office has enlisted around 35 volunteers so the city is prepared -- if Proposition 8 is overturned -- to conduct as many as 200 weddings on the first day same-sex marriage becomes legal.

That's more than four times the number of marriages the office oversees on an average day, he said.

"We're pretty much going to be the main destination, and we get people coming in from all over the region," Barnes said.

"We're ready to go," he said.

San Mateo County deputy clerk-recorder Theresa Rabe said her county saw a significant increase in marriage applications when gay marriage was legalized statewide between June and November 2008, and that her office is fully prepared to accommodate another rush of marriages.

"We saw a very large increase for those few months," Rabe said.

"We had people lined up outside the doors, and we are anticipating that again."

Special preparations included cross-training staff to process marriage applications and perform ceremonies, as well ensuring that the county's internal software was fully updated with the most recent changes to state forms.

"Our forms, our computer systems ... everything is absolutely ready to go," she said.

The Supreme Court could rule on Proposition 8 in any of a number of ways.

It could uphold the initiative leaving the gay marriage ban in place, or it could strike it down on grounds that could apply to California alone, to states that already allow gay marriage, or to all 50 states.

The court could also decide to dismiss the appeal if it concludes that the sponsors lacked the legal authority to defend Proposition 8 on appeal after California officials declined to do so.

Santa Clara University constitutional law professor Pratheepan Gulasekaram said a ruling to dismiss Proposition 8 based on lack of standing would leave in place a 2010 ruling by U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker that overturned the gay marriage ban.

Such a ruling would not necessarily allow gay marriages to proceed right away, and would leave the door open to more litigation at the district court level "to determine the scope of Walker's decision," Gulasekaram said.

"If that's the case, it's a little more complicated," he said.

"There's an open question as to when and how the ruling would be implemented."

Gulasekaram said the Supreme Court could issue its decision on Prop 8 as early as Thursday or as late as June 27, when the Court's 2012-2013 session ends.

Oakland: 16-Year-Old Boy Pleads Not Guilty to Murdering Paramedic

A 16-year-old boy pleaded not guilty Monday to a murder charge stemming from the shooting death of off-duty paramedic Quinn Boyer in the Oakland Hills two months ago.

Christian Burton, who is being prosecuted as an adult for allegedly shooting Boyer on April 2, is scheduled to return to Alameda County Superior Court on July 8 for a pretrial hearing.

In addition to murder, Burton faces a special-circumstance allegation that he murdered Boyer during the course of a carjacking, which could make him eligible for the death penalty if convicted.

A total of six juveniles have been charged in connection with Boyer's death, but Oakland police Officer Phong Tran said in a probable cause statement filed in court that authorities believe Burton is the person who shot Boyer.

Tran said Burton was linked to the killing through physical evidence and witness statements and, after he was arrested, "he provided an admission of his involvement in the shooting death of the victim."

Boyer, 34, had worked as a paramedic for five years, the last two for Santa Clara County Ambulance.

He was shot while driving on Keller Avenue just below Skyline Boulevard shortly before noon on April 2 and crashed his car down a ravine in the 5200 block of Keller Avenue.

He died two days later.

He grew up in Oakland and was in the city the day of the shooting to take his father to a medical appointment.

He was a graduate of Sonoma State University, the Santa Rosa Fire Academy and the Foothill Paramedic Program, and is survived by his wife and family.

Prosecutors said the other boys in custody, who range in age from 13 to 15, have been charged in juvenile court with multiple felonies, including murder, for their alleged roles in the crime.

Their names have not been released because they are not being tried as adults.

Tran said Burton and the other five teens saw Boyer in a parking area at Keller Avenue and Hanson Street, and that Burton and one of the other youths approached him "with the intent to forcefully take his vehicle."

Burton then allegedly shot Boyer during the attempted carjacking, Tran said.

After Monday's brief hearing, Burton's father, Richard Burton, said he thinks his son is innocent because he believes he was in school at the time that Boyer was shot.

Referring to his son, Burton said, "He wasn't there and he didn't know anything" about the shooting.

Referring to the allegation that his son planned to carjack Boyer and used a high-powered weapon, Burton said, "My son does not fit that description."

SF: Supes Consider Legislation Altering Regulations for Food Trucks

With food trucks becoming more and more popular in San Francisco, a committee of the city's Board of Supervisors Monday considered legislation that will clarify and change the regulations for the businesses.

The package of legislation authored by Supervisor Scott Wiener would create a 75-foot "buffer zone" around the entrances to restaurants where food trucks cannot operate but would reduce the buffer zone distance from schools in the city.

The ordinances would also update zoning rules to allow the food trucks to operate on college and hospital campuses while also making the permitting and enforcement processes easier, Wiener said at Monday afternoon's land use and economic development committee hearing at City Hall.

The supervisor said the legislation was the result of "two years of very, very intensive negotiations with the various stakeholders," including food truck operators, owners of brick-and-mortar restaurants, various city departments and the San Francisco Unified School District.

SFUSD director of policy and planning Chris Armentrout said the district is still against the legislation in its current form, which would reduce the buffer zone around schools from its current distance of 1,500 feet to 500 feet for middle schools and 750 to 1,000 feet for high schools.

Armentrout said before the initial food truck legislation, "the vendors were right outside our campus" and had an adverse effect on schools' lunch programs.

But city youth commissioner and high school student Nicholas Persky said a slightly longer walk was not preventing students from going to the trucks.

"Youth are willing to go pretty far just for food," Persky said.

"Walking an extra 250 feet isn't going to be an issue."

Wiener said the 1,500-foot buffer zone around schools made it hard for food trucks to operate in many areas of the city, including much of the Mission District.

Rob Black, executive director of the Golden Gate Restaurant Association, which includes both brick-and-mortar restaurants and food trucks among its members, said he was in support of Wiener's legislation.

"It provides a clearer path to all sides about what is allowed," Black said.

Matt Cohen, founder of the popular Off the Grid food truck gatherings, said the permitting process currently for the businesses "can continue for so long" and that the new legislation would help streamline it.

Wiener said under the new ordinance, Municipal Transportation Authority parking control officers would have the authority to issue tickets to food trucks operating without a permit.

Currently Department of Public Works inspectors are issuing the citations, but there is a lack of enforcement because the department does not have enough resources, Wiener said.

The committee ended up sending the legislation to the full board, which will consider it at its June 18 meeting.

Santa Cruz Co.: House Raided by Guests During Large Party

A large party turned ugly when the home in Aptos was raided and a number of items were stolen on Saturday night including weapons, jewelry, and electronics, a California Highway Patrol spokesman said.

The CHP was called to assist Santa Cruz County Sheriff's deputies at a home on Valencia Road near Flume Road about 11:20 p.m. on reports of burglary and shots fired, Officer Brad Sadek said.

Upon arrival, sheriff deputies had already begun to break up the house party of around 300 people.

The CHP officers who arrived on scene noticed a vehicle leaving the scene and it backed up and nearly collided with a pedestrian as if it were trying to evade the CHP vehicle, Sadek said.

Officers conducted a DUI investigation and arrested the teenage boy.

A search of the vehicle revealed multiple stolen items, including a shotgun, rifle, jewelry, and computers, Sadek said.

Officers also found marijuana and other drug paraphernalia.

The Santa Cruz County Sheriff's Office is investigating the house party but was unavailable for comment. 

SF: Bicyclist Seriously Injures Pedestrian on Market Street Sidewalk

A 50-year-old woman was seriously injured when she was struck by a bicyclist while walking on a sidewalk along San Francisco's Market Street this weekend, police said Monday.

The woman was struck at about 12:25 p.m. Sunday near Market and Stockton streets.

The bicyclist, a 21-year-old man, was traveling west when he struck the woman, who was walking in the opposite direction, police spokesman Officer Gordon Shyy said.

The woman was taken to San Francisco General Hospital to be treated for head injuries that are considered life-threatening, police said.

The bicyclist stopped at the scene and was interviewed but was not cited.

He was released pending further investigation, Shyy said.

SF: Apple Announces New Security Measures to Curb iPhone Thefts

Apple announced at a conference in San Francisco Monday that the company will be including software in its new operating system that will make it harder for thieves to resell stolen smartphones.

The announcement at Apple's annual Worldwide Developers Conference revealed that the new iOS 7 coming this fall will include "activation lock" technology requiring the initial user's Apple ID and password to turn off the Find My iPhone app or to or reactivate the phone.

Users who lose their iPhone or have it stolen can also display a custom message on the phone's screen with their phone number and a request to return the phone.

The company said in a statement on its website that the new technology will "make it harder for anyone who's not you to use or sell your device."

The announcement comes just days before Apple was set to meet with other smartphone manufacturers at a summit organized by top San Francisco and New York law enforcement officials.

The meeting, scheduled for Thursday with San Francisco District Attorney George Gascon, New York state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman and the manufacturers, will be about how to curb the rising trend of smartphone thefts, which has been dubbed "Apple-picking."

San Francisco police estimate that roughly half of all street robberies in the city target cellphones.

Gascon has criticized Apple and other manufacturers for not doing enough to prevent the thefts, saying the technological fix is simple and would reduce the incentive to steal the phones.

Gascon and Schneiderman made a joint statement Monday about Apple's announcement regarding the new security measures.

"We are appreciative of the gesture made by Apple to address smartphone theft. We reserve judgment on the activation lock feature until we can understand its actual functionality," the pair said. 

"We are hopeful that the cellphone industry will imbed persistent technology that is free to consumers that will make a phone inoperable once stolen, even if the device is off, the SIM card is removed or the phone is modified by a thief to avoid detection," Gascon and Schneiderman said.

Thursday's "Smartphone Summit" will take place in Schneiderman's office in New York City. 

Weather Forecast for the San Francisco Bay Area

Mostly cloudy skies are likely in the Bay Area this morning.

Highs are expected to be in the mid 50s to upper 60s, with westerly winds up to 20 mph.

Mostly clear skies are likely this evening, with patchy fog after midnight.

Lows are likely to be in the lower 50s, with southwest winds up to 20 mph.

Cloudy skies are expected Wednesday morning, becoming sunny later in the morning.

Highs are expected to be in the 50s to upper 60s, with westerly winds up to 20 mph and gusts up to 35 mph in the afternoon.

 

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San Francisco Bay Area Monday Morning News Roundup

Pleasanton: One Killed, One Injured After Car Hits Bicyclists on Foothill Road

One bicyclist was killed and one injured when a car struck them on Foothill Road in Pleasanton Sunday afternoon, according to police.

The bicyclists, a husband and wife, were riding north on Foothill Road around a quarter mile south of Golden Eagle Way shortly after 1 p.m. when they were struck by a northbound car, according to Lt. Brian Laurence.

The wife was thrown from her bicycle and pronounced dead at the scene, while the husband was taken to a hospital with non-life threatening injuries, Laurence said.

The driver, an 18-year-old Pleasanton resident, stopped at the scene.

The cause of the collision is under investigation.

The identities of the victims and the driver have not been released. 

SJ: Person Struck, Killed by Light Rail Train at Sunol and Auzerais

A person was killed by a light rail train in San Jose Saturday evening, according to a Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority spokesperson.

A northbound train on the Winchester- Mountain View line struck a person with a bicycle around 5:45 p.m. at the intersection of Sunol Street and Auzerais Avenue, VTA spokeswoman Brandi Childress said.

Passengers were carried around the area by bus, but service did not completely recover after the collision until nearly midnight, Childress said.

Investigators have not yet determined the cause of the collision, and are speaking to witnesses and examining security camera footage Childress said. 

The intersection where it occurred has crossing signals and gates.

It also remains unclear whether the person was riding or walking the bicycle at the time of the collision, Childress said.

The identity of the person killed has not yet been released, according to the Santa Clara County Medical Examiner's Office.

SJ: Winning Lottery Ticket Worth More Than $317,000 Sold at Lion Supermarket

A California Lottery ticket worth $317,655 was sold at a San Jose supermarket, lottery officials announced Sunday.

The winning ticket was sold at Lion Supermarket at 1710 Tully Road, officials said.

The ticket matched all five numbers in Saturday's Fantasy 5 draw, which were 10, 3, 32, 31 and 37.

The winner has 180 days from the date of the drawing to claim the cash prize. 

Hayward: San Leandro Teacher to be Arraigned on Child Porn, Burglary Charges

A San Leandro High School teacher facing child porn and burglary charges is scheduled to be arraigned this afternoon in Alameda County Superior Court in Hayward.

Richard Styner, 45, was charged on May 7 with possession of child porn and residential burglary after school officials contacted police about a nude photo he allegedly displayed in class.

Styner, a San Leandro resident, was teaching a computer class on April 16 at San Leandro High School, located at 2200 Bancroft Ave., and while showing students how to transfer pictures from electronic devices, he allegedly showed a naked picture of himself, according to court documents.

Students in the class range from 14 to 18 years old and are both males and females.

After he reported the incident to school officials as an accident, a search of his computer allegedly turned up 200 pornographic stories and disturbing photos stored in a folder on the device, according to court documents.

The burglary charge relates to an alleged break-in in October 2012.

Styner allegedly entered the home of a female friend who had given him a key for emergencies, photographed her underwear and other personal items and took some clothing, according to prosecutors.

San Leandro Unified School District Superintendent Cindy Cathey has previously said the district is conducting its own investigation into the incident.

Alameda: Fire Crews Rescue Distressed Surfer Off the Shore of Crown Memorial Beach

Firefighters were able to rescue a kite surfer who got stuck in the San Francisco Bay, just off the shore in Alameda, Saturday evening, fire officials said.

Crews responded to a report of a kite surfer in distress at the Robert W. Crown Memorial State Beach, near the 1800 block of Shore Line Drive, at about 7:20 p.m., according to fire officials.

When firefighters arrived, they located the surfer about a half mile off shore and water rescue team members, in their rescue boat, went out to rescue him, officials said.

The rescue crew members were able to bring the surfer and his kite and board safely back to shore, according to officials.

No one was injured in the rescue.

SF: Three Men Wounded in Early Morning Shooting South of Market Street

Three men were wounded in a shooting in San Francisco's South of Market neighborhood early Sunday morning, police said.

Officers responded to reports of multiple shots fired in a parking lot near Second and Howard streets at about 2:15 a.m., San Francisco police Sgt. Dennis Toomer said.

Arriving officers found three men in their early 30s who had been shot in the upper torso, Toomer said.

None of the victims' injuries were expected to be life threatening, he said.

One of the victims was from San Francisco, and the other two were from the East Bay, Toomer said.

A preliminary investigation revealed the victims had been involved in a verbal argument with a Hispanic man in his 20s prior to the shooting.

The suspected shooter was described as standing around 6 feet tall and weighing between 150 and 175 pounds.

He fled the area in a gray sedan and has not been identified.

The case remains under investigation by San Francisco police. 

Vallejo: Police Arrest Five Men in Prostitution Sting

Five men were arrested in an undercover prostitution sting in Vallejo Friday, police said.

The five-hour operation, titled "Operation Good Will," was focused on the area immediately north of downtown, which has been plagued by the crime, according to police.

Police arrested Vallejo residents Jose Valasquez, 32, and Marcus Land, 35, Napa residents Ruben Torres, 59, and Jose Alfredo, 33, and transient James Wilson, 46, according to police.

All the men were booked into the Solano County Jail.

The operation was a collaboration between Vallejo police, Solano County Sheriff's Office and the California Highway Patrol.

Sausalito: CHP Officer Revives Woman on Side of Road

An unconscious, unresponsive woman was revived by a Marin area California Highway Patrol officer Friday afternoon in Sausalito, the CHP said.

Officers responded to a report of a woman who had fallen to the ground on the side of the road of U.S. Highway 101, just north of Alexander Avenue, at about 1:45 p.m., according to the CHP.

The woman, who was visiting the Bay Area from Wisconsin, was riding with her husband, the CHP said.

After the woman collapsed, her husband used a roadside call box to request help, the CHP said.

Shortly after the report, Officer Oscar Franco located the woman, 43, who didn't have a pulse, according to the CHP.

Franco and the woman's husband conducted two-person CPR, and were able to revive the woman, the CHP said.

She was transported to Marin General Hospital and is in stable condition, according to the CHP. 

SSF: Person Killed in Solo Rollover Crash Sunday Morning

A person died in a car crash in South San Francisco Sunday morning, according to the California Highway Patrol.

The crash was reported at about 3:35 a.m. somewhere on Interstate Highway 280, the CHP said.

A car overturned and landed off the highway and in the area of Junipero Serra and Westborough boulevards, the CHP said.

It was then engulfed into flames, with at least one person inside, according to the CHP.

A person was pronounced dead at the scene.

Sunnyvale: Police Investigating a Shooting Outside a Sports Bar This Morning

Police in Sunnyvale are investigating a homicide that occurred outside a sports bar Sunday morning, a police captain said.

Officers responded to a report of a shooting at The Peacock Lounge bar, located at 102 E. Fremont Ave., at about 1:05 a.m., Capt. Dave Pitts said.

When officers arrived, they found a male suffering from gunshot wounds, Pitts said.

He was pronounced dead at the scene.

Police received a call from a hospital about a gunshot victim that Pitts said is possibly a second victim from the shooting.

Details about what led to the shooting are unknown, but Pitts said "there was some sort of party" and police are "still trying to sort out the details."

No arrests have been made. Santa Clara police and the Santa Clara County Sheriff's Office assisted Sunnyvale police at the scene. 

Weather Forecast for the San Francisco Bay Area

Mostly cloudy skies are likely in the Bay Area this morning, with patchy fog.

Highs are expected to be in the mid 50s to lower 60s, with southwest winds up to 20 mph.

Mostly cloudy skies are likely this evening, with patchy fog after midnight.

Lows are likely to be in the lower 50s, with southwest winds up to 20 mph.

Mostly cloudy skies are expected Tuesday morning, with patchy fog, becoming sunny later in the morning.

Highs are expected to be in the 50s to upper 60s, with southwest winds up to 10 mph.

 

Check out some of our most popular blogs:

     We Built a Stronger SF Economy on Smart Government Investments

     The BART That Could Have Been

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     Love Muni, Hate Muni or Somewhere in Between? Let the SFMTA Know!

 

Pride Board To Make Decision On Honoring Bradley Manning At Parade

Supporters of Bradley Manning are waiting for a decision today from the San Francisco Pride board about their decision to rescind their nomination of the former U.S. Army intelligence analyst as a grand marshal at this year's SF Pride Parade.

Manning, who is openly gay, was initially announced as one of the grand marshals to be honored at the parade held on June 30, but at the end of April, SF Pride board president Lisa Williams announced that he would not be honored in the festivities. The decision caused an uproar among supporters of Manning.

After several protests, last week the board agreed to consider reinstating him and decided to announce today whether any changes will occur regarding the plans for the parade, Manning supporter Lisa Geduldig said.

Geduldig said the board agreed to decide by this afternoon whether to reinstate Manning, give him a different honor, or drop their consideration.

SF Pride officials were not immediately available this afternoon to comment on their decision. Previously, board president Williams had said Manning would not be honored while his case was still in court.

Geduldig said, "Regardless of what happens, we've declared Bradley Manning the people's grand marshal." A group of supporters is holding a news conference outside the Pride offices at 1841 Market St. at 5:30 p.m. today.

San Francisco Supervisor David Campos is one of the planned speakers because of his efforts to sway the board to reconsider their nomination, according to organizers.

Manning would have been honored at the parade in absentia because he remains in military custody after he was accused of leaking classified information to the online group WikiLeaks.

Manning has been charged with aiding the enemy, wrongfully causing intelligence to be published on the Internet knowing that it is accessible to the enemy, theft of public property or records, transmitting defense information, fraud and violating Army regulations.

He appeared in a Maryland martial court this week and his trial will continue next week. The pro-Manning group is holding a teach-in and discussion on Saturday at 4 p.m. at 2278 Market St. to raise issues, criticism, support and questions about Manning, his actions and the impact on the LGBT community.

 

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"Spare The Air" Alert Issued For Saturday

A "Spare the Air" alert has been issued by the Bay Area Air Quality Management District for Saturday, the second straight day the alert is being issued because of unhealthy pollution levels, air quality officials said today.

An unhealthy amount of ozone pollution is expected in the region because of a combination of hot weather, low winds and car exhaust, according to air quality officials. A similar alert was issued on Friday by the district.

On days when the alerts are issued, Bay Area residents are advised to walk, bike, carpool or use public transit instead of driving when possible.

There is no free public transit available and, unlike winter "Spare the Air" alerts, no ban on wood burning is in effect, according to the district.

Anyone who plans to exercise outdoors is advised to do so in the early morning hours when ozone concentrations are lower, district officials said. Saturday's "Spare the Air" alert is the third in the Bay Area since the season started on May 1.

 

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MUNI Bus Wire Snafu Knocks Light Post, Injuring Four

A San Francisco Municipal Railway bus pulled down overhead lines in downtown San Francisco this morning, causing the lines to become tangled on a light post that bent and injured two adults and two children on a school outing, a fire department spokeswoman said.

The connector cords to the overhead cables came off and wiring became tangled around a light post at Market and Main streets around 10:30 a.m., fire spokeswoman Mindy Talmadge said.

The bent post hit an adult leading a group of schoolchildren on a field trip and also hit one of the children.

Those two both fell onto another adult and another child.

All four suffered minor injuries in the incident and were taken to the hospital as a precaution, Talmadge said. No one was hit by the overhead wires, she said.

A Muni spokesman was not immediately available for comment on the incident.

 

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Protestors Occupying Former Farm Site Say Workers Locked Out, Event Planned

Activists occupying the former site of Hayes Valley Farm in San Francisco said they locked out workers sent to cut trees down this morning and that they plan a live music event and neighborhood barbecue this weekend.

The "Liberate the Land" protestors entered the site at Fell and Laguna streets on Saturday, a day after proprietors of the farm vacated the land.

The protesters dubbed the space "Gezi Gardens" after a park in Istanbul that has been the subject of recent protests. 

The group said today that it has built six tree-sitting platforms on the site, planted gardens, served meals, organized workshops and activities and built a village "to demonstrate ecological living in the city."

Workers sent to cut down trees on the site were locked out around 8 a.m. today, the protestors said.

Protestors said Thursday that they had been served with a notice to vacate the land by San Francisco police.

A San Francisco police spokesman denied that officers had served any notices to the site and said police were not on the scene as of this morning.

Hayes Valley Farm had operated under a temporary interim use agreement, in which the city granted fiscal support and use of the land formerly occupied by a freeway on-ramp that was torn down.

It began in January 2010. But the land, which the city sold to developers Avalon Bay and Build Inc., was always slated for development. A 182-unit housing project is slated to start construction later this year. 

The occupation does not involve Hayes Valley Farm organizers, who have said that the farm's resources were distributed to a number of legacy projects throughout San Francisco, including The Bee Farm, Bloom Justice, 49 Farms, BRANCH/Youth Education, Please Touch Community Garden, The Potrero Hill Learning Garden, Beecology and Urban Commons SF.

According to the Hayes Valley Farm website, as many as 20,000 volunteers worked on the 2.2-acre farm during its time in San Francisco and community events large and small were common at the location, including yoga and holiday celebrations.

Activists said they planned a barbecue with live music, workshops and a neighborhood meeting Saturday, with music starting as early as 10 a.m. and the barbecue around noon.

A neighborhood meeting at 3 p.m. Saturday will "open a dialogue about preserving this open green space and potentially turning it into a commons for the people of San Francisco," and include a "teach-in" about the Gezi Park protests in Turkey, the activists said in a statement.

 

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San Francisco Bay Area Friday Weather Forecast

Mostly cloudy skies and patchy fog are likely in the Bay Area this morning, becoming sunny later in the day.

Highs are expected to be in the upper 50s to lower 70s, with winds up to 20 mph in the afternoon. Mostly clear skies are likely this evening, becoming partly cloudy.

Lows are likely to be in the 50s, with southwest winds up to 20 mph. Mostly cloudy skies are expected Saturday morning.

Highs are expected to be in the upper 50s to lower 70s, with southwest winds up to 20 mph.

 

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Man Stabbed at Hotel by Boyfriend of Man He Was With

A man was stabbed at a hotel in San Francisco on Thursday morning, apparently by the boyfriend of a man who stayed overnight with him at the hotel, police said today. The stabbing was reported at 8:52 a.m. Thursday outside the Sonoma Inn at 1485 Bush St. near Van Ness Avenue.

The 39-year-old victim and another man had spent the night at the hotel and left briefly in the morning. As they were walking back into the building, a suspect approached and stabbed the victim in the abdomen, according to police.

The suspect, described as a man in his 20s, was apparently the boyfriend of the man who was with the victim, police said. He fled and had not been found as of this morning. 

The victim was taken to San Francisco General Hospital to be treated for injuries that are not considered life-threatening, police said. Anyone with information about the stabbing is asked to call the Police Department's anonymous tip line at (415) 575-4444 or to send a tip by text message to TIP411 with "SFPD" in the message.

 

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Vehicle Struck Fire Hydrant Before Fleeing

A vehicle struck a fire hydrant and then fled the scene in East Oakland this morning, according to fire officials.

Fire officials said the vehicle struck the hydrant at about 3 a.m., near the intersection of 55th Avenue and International Boulevard.

No vehicle was located when fire and police officials arrived at the intersection, police said.

 

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San Francisco Bay Area Friday Morning News Roundup

President Obama Arrives for Brief Bay Area Visit

President Barack Obama arrived in the Bay Area Thursday for a visit including a pair of Democratic Party fundraisers Thursday night and a talk at the Fairmont hotel in San Jose this morning.

Air Force One touched down at Moffett Field in Mountain View at 5:41 p.m., about 20 minutes ahead of schedule.

Obama jogged down the steps from the plane at 5:56 p.m. wearing a black suit and a blue tie.

He greeted about 50 people invited to the landing, including Sunnyvale Mayor Tony Spitaleri, Ames Research director Peter Worden, California National Guard Col. Steven Butow and Mountain View Mayor John Inks.

After shaking Obama's hand, Inks said, "He told me how much he likes Mountain View. He says when his term is over he's going to be enjoying California more."

"He looks very, very good for having a tough job. His face is bright. That is a job that wears on you," Inks said.

After shaking the hands of some of the guests, the president quickly got into black limousine with presidential flags and his motorcade drove on with vans full of reporters and several California Highway Patrol cars following.

Obama headed to Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee fundraisers at the home of tech entrepreneurs Mike and Marci McCue in Palo Alto and the Portola Valley home of Neeru and Vinod Khosla, co-founder of Sun Microsystems.

He planned to spend the night in San Jose and will speak at the Fairmont this morning about the Affordable Care Act and its benefits for Californians before departing from Moffett Field later Thursday.

While he is in town, protesters planned to let him know how they feel about issues such as the Keystone XL, a proposed pipeline that would carry oil from tar sands in Canada to the Gulf Coast.

The project has been harshly criticized by environmentalists.

"We want to show him we're passionate about this issue and remind him what he campaigned on," said Fay Chazin-Seidelman, who is planning to participate in a protest Thursday evening at University Avenue and Middlefield Road, near the site of Obama's first fundraiser.

The protest was organized in part by the environmental group CREDO, which held similar demonstrations during the president's last visit to the Bay Area in April.

"He speaks to wanting to reduce global warming and climate change and he's very big on alternative energy sources, so it would be kind of hypocritical for him to in any way consider supporting the Keystone pipeline," Chazin-Seidelman said.

Thursday morning, immigrant advocates held a sit-in at Fruitvale Plaza in Oakland to call on the president to stop what they call unjust deportations of undocumented immigrants.

The group East Bay Immigrant Youth Coalition was among the organizers of the event, which was scheduled for 8 a.m. at the plaza at 3411 E. 12th St. in Oakland.

SF: Female Passenger Shot on Muni Bus in Potrero Hill

A man was injured when someone shot at a San Francisco Municipal Railway bus in the city's Potrero Hill neighborhood Thursday afternoon, a police spokesman said.

The shooting occurred around 2:15 p.m. at 25th and Wisconsin streets.

A preliminary investigation indicated that three suspects got onto a 19-Polk bus, then got off a short time later and opened fire on the bus.

The victim, a bus passenger believed to be in his early 20s, was either grazed by a bullet or struck by shards of shattered glass, police spokesman Officer Carlos Manfredi said.

He suffered superficial wounds to his head.

Police had initially reported that the victim was a female but have since clarified that it was a man who was injured.

The Muni bus driver took the victim to San Francisco General Hospital, where he is being treated for injuries that are not considered life-threatening, Manfredi said.

The bus remained parked outside the hospital Thursday afternoon with two bullet holes in a rear left window.

Police had placed evidence markers over two bullet casings in the roadway at 25th and Wisconsin streets.

San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency officials posted on Twitter that the 19-Polk line was rerouted around the area because of the police activity but that regular service has since resumed.

The Police Department's gang task force is investigating the shooting but no other information was immediately available about the suspects.

nyone with information about the shooting is asked to call the Police Department's anonymous tip line at (415) 575-4444 or to send a tip by text message to TIP411. 

Oakland: Judge Allows Charter School to Keep Operating For Now

A judge Thursday granted a temporary restraining order that allows an Oakland charter school that has high-achieving students but allegedly engaged in financial improprieties to keep operating for now.

The Oakland school board voted by a narrow 4-3 margin on March 20 to revoke the charter for the American Indian Model Schools, alleging that the school hasn't done enough to rectify financial irregularities that were found in a state audit last year.

The board's action meant that the school, which was founded in 1996 and has 1,200 students at three campuses in Oakland, was set to lose its funding at the end of the month and close its doors.

American Indian Model Schools filed an appeal of the school board's decision to the Alameda County Board of Education on April 18, but that board hasn't held a hearing on the matter yet and the earliest it could act would be June 25, five days after the school's summer session is scheduled to begin on June 20.

Alameda County Superior Court Judge Evelio Grillo said at a hearing Thursday that he's concerned that the merits of the school's appeal may not be heard "before it goes out of business" and he believes it would be irreparably harmed if it was closed now.

Grillo said American Indian Model Schools "appears to be functioning at a high level" and he thinks its students should be allowed to "do what students do, which is study" during the appellate process.

After Grillo ruled, the school's attorney, James Kachmar, said, "We're ecstatic. This is about the students."

Kachmar said Grillo's ruling means that the school can go ahead with its summer session and plan for its upcoming fall session.

He said at this point it's not clear if Grillo will rule on the merits of a lawsuit the school filed against the Oakland Unified School District or wait until after the county board of education rules on the school's appeal.

During the hearing Thursday, Kachmar said the appellate process could be lengthy.

He said the county board has until July 18 to act on the school's appeal and if that board doesn't rule in favor of the school it could then appeal to the state board of education, which would have another six months to act.

School district spokesman Troy Flint said the district believed that the appeals process should have been completed before the matter went to court.

"We felt that there's an established procedure for appeals and that a court ruling at this time didn't make sense but the judge felt differently," Flint said.

Flint said the school board voted to revoke American Indian Model School's charter "to protect the taxpayers" because the school abused the public's trust by misusing public funds.

He said financial improprieties at the school have been documented by three different agencies. 

Regional: Three Bay Area Hospitals Among 10 in State Fined for Patient Safety and Health Violations

Three Bay Area hospitals were issued penalties and fines totaling $225,000 Wednesday for incidents in 2011 that caused or were likely to cause patient deaths.

They were among 10 hospitals in the state that were penalized and fined a total of $625,000 by the California Department of Public Health Wednesday.

Marin General Hospital in Greenbrae was fined $75,000 for giving a dialysis patient the wrong medication that caused gangrene to the patient's toes and fingers.

Faced with continuous dialysis and pain from the gangrenous toes and fingers, the patient's family decided to discontinue all medical care and the patient died, according to the report of the incident.

It was Marin General Hospital's third administrative penalty.

The California Pacific Medical Center's Pacific Campus in San Francisco was fined $100,000 for failure to remove a sponge from the body of a patient who had bladder surgery.

It was the hospital's fourth administrative penalty.

The California Pacific Medical Center's St' Luke's Campus Hospital in San Francisco was fined $50,000 for leaving a guide wire inside a patient's heart during a catheter procedure on a diabetic patient who needed emergency dialysis to prevent kidney failure.

It was the hospital's first administrative penalty. The hospitals can appeal the penalties and fines.

During a media conference call Thursday morning, Debby Rogers, deputy director of the Department of Public Health's Center for Health Care Quality, said 276 administrative penalties have been issued to 150 California hospitals between 2009 and 2011.

Incidents before 2009 carry a fine of $25,000, but the fines for incidents after Jan. 1, 2009, increased to $50,000 for a first violation, $75,000 for a second violation and $100,000 for a third or subsequent violation of a hospital's licensing requirements.

Legislation is pending to raise the fines to $75,000 for a first violation, $100,000 for a second violation and $125,000 for three or more penalties in a three-year period, Rogers said.

Twenty-six percent of the penalties against hospitals are for leaving foreign objects, such as sponges, inside a patient's body, and 22 percent are for medication errors, Rogers said.

They are consistently the top two hospital licensing violations.

Five of the ten administrative penalties issued Wednesday relate to leaving a foreign body inside a patient, Rogers said.

Since 2007, the California Department of Public Health has assessed $11.9 million in fines, including Wednesday's $625,000, and has collected $8.8 million.

Hospitals are appealing $3.1 million in fines, Rogers said. 

Oakland: Police Administrative Building to Remain Closed Until Monday After Plumbing Issue Causes Damage

Oakland police headquarters will remain closed to the public until Monday after a plumbing issue Tuesday caused water damage on several floors, police said.

An incident on the third floor of the nine-story building at 455 Seventh St. occurred early that morning and damaged the floors below.

The building briefly reopened Wednesday morning but closed when it was determined that more work was needed to dry out the building.

Restoration efforts continued Thursday and are expected to keep the building closed until Monday, police said.

Most employees are still able to enter and come to work, police said.

Police services usually offered at the administrative building, such as vehicle releases, fingerprinting and other appointments, will be temporarily offered at the Police Department's Eastmont substation at 2651 73rd Ave.

The substation is open from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Mill Valley: Car Strikes Light Pole, Damages Two Hair Salons

Two hair salons were damaged after a car crashed into a light pole and then one of the two Mill Valley businesses Wednesday evening, a fire battalion chief said.

Police and fire responded at 5:30 p.m. when the black 1996 Honda crashed into London Salon at 170 E. Blithedale Ave., Battalion Chief Scott Barnes said.

The crash caused structural damage to the front of London Salon while the light pole broke a window at adjacent Sage Salon, Barnes said.

No injures were reported, Detective Sgt. Paul Wrapp said.

Sage Salon Owner Maha Case said her business was closed Wednesday during the crash.

A desk and shelves were located near the window, which was boarded up with plywood, Case said.

Glass from the crash was cleaned up Wednesday evening and the salon was opened for business Thursday, Case said.

London Salon Owner Kim Ngo said she was working with a client and walked into the back to grab a towel when she heard the crash.

Ngo said she heard a very loud explosion and walked out to see the whole shop covered in smoke with the Honda inside of her business.

"To tell you the truth I'm still in shock," Ngo said.

No pedestrians were outside London Salon during the crash but Ngo said many people walk by and admire a red telephone booth inside, Ngo said.

Ngo said the salon is closed due to safety concerns and is accommodating customers at Le Salon located down East Blithedale Avenue.

Preliminary information showed that the driver was driving at a safe speed and did not appear to be under the influence of drugs or alcohol, Wrapp said.

Traffic was closed on East Blithedale Avenue for about an hour and cars were diverted to Grove and Hill streets and Presidio Avenue, Wrapp said. 

Vallejo: Three Simultaneous Water Main Breaks May Have Been Caused by Repair Work

Three nearly simultaneous water main breaks in Vallejo may have been caused when crews working on a fire hydrant elsewhere in Vallejo shut down water for the repairs, a fire captain said.

The breaks happened at about 4 p.m. as crews were shutting down water for repair work on Tuolumne Street, Capt. Mike Brooks said.

Simultaneously, water mains burst at Solano Avenue and Mariposa Street, at Webb Street and Pearl Court, and at Elliott and Dillon drives, Brooks said.

The breaks caused some flooding in nearby streets but nothing that rose above the curb or affected anything other than streets.

The storm drains took care of most of the water, Brooks said.

Crews quickly shut water off in the three areas and are working on repairs.

Neighbors in the areas of the three breaks are temporarily without water service, Brooks said.

Clayton: Bomb Threat on Middle School Bathroom Wall Puts School, Police on Alert

Police are investigating a bomb threat made on Thursday to blow up Diablo View Middle School in Clayton today, Clayton police Officer Allan Pike said. Middle school principal Patti Bannister advised police that a message written in the girls' bathroom earlier this week said "I will blow up this school on 6-7-13."

The school is located at 300 Diablo View Lane.

According to Pike, a student told administrators about the message, which started an investigation into whether the threat was deemed credible.

Pike said the school has taken action to ensure that the campus is safe for students to attend today.

He said school officials notified police, took writing samples from students, briefed staff members and hired a private security officer.

Pike said police would search the school this morning and have a presence on campus throughout the day.

Parents and students were also notified by the school about the incident with an alert sent via email, Pike said.

Pike said police do not believe the threat is credible.

As of Thursday afternoon, no students had been detained or named as responsible for the threat, he said.

There are five days of school left in the year, he said, and administrators are encouraging parents to send students to school. 

Gilroy: Abandoned Lunchbox Shuts Down Walmart for Two Hours

A suspicious package that evacuated a Gilroy Walmart for about two hours Thursday afternoon turned out to be a lunchbox left behind, a police sergeant said.

The lunchbox was reported as a suspicious package left at a McDonald's restaurant inside the store in the 7100 block of Camino Arroyo at about 3 p.m., Sgt. Pedro Espinoza said.

The store was voluntary evacuated as a precaution.

Gilroy police swept the building and the Santa Cruz County bomb squad responded and X-rayed the package.

It was determined to be a lunchbox, and the store reopened at about 5:15 p.m. 

Weather Forecast for the San Francisco Bay Area

Mostly cloudy skies and patchy fog are likely in the Bay Area this morning, becoming sunny later in the day.

Highs are expected to be in the upper 50s to lower 70s, with winds up to 20 mph in the afternoon.

Mostly clear skies are likely this evening, becoming partly cloudy.

Lows are likely to be in the 50s, with southwest winds up to 20 mph.

Mostly cloudy skies are expected Saturday morning.

Highs are expected to be in the upper 50s to lower 70s, with southwest winds up to 20 mph.

 

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Paid for by Phil Ting for Assembly 2012. FPPC ID# 1343137