SF News

Fireworks Seen Wednesday Night Unrelated to Bay Bridge Transition

A fireworks display that surprised some San Francisco residents on Wednesday night was part of an annual IT conference at AT&T Park and had nothing to do with the transition to a new Bay Bridge, fireworks organizers and transit officials said this morning.

The display, which lit up the sky above the ballpark around 10 p.m., was put on by Pyro Spectaculars, the same company that produced San Francisco's Fourth of July fireworks show, said show producer Jeff Thomas.

The show was for attendees at VMWorld, a conference presented by Palo Alto-based software company VMWareThe event also featured concerts by Train and Imagine Dragons, according to the event website.

Some residents were caught off guard by the display and wondered if the fireworks were commemorating this week's Bay Bridge closure and the imminent opening of the much-anticipated new eastern span.

"What's with the SoMa fireworks in San Francisco at 10 p.m.?" one local Twitter user asked. "Random. Blowing up the Bay Bridge?"

Metropolitan Transportation Commission officials say there are no fireworks planned -- nor any major public celebration at all -- to mark the opening of the new eastern span next week.

Instead, a low-key ceremony is scheduled for Monday afternoon that will include a chain-cutting and a few speeches, MTC spokesman Randy Rentschler said.

The eastern span is set to open by 5 a.m. Tuesday.

Initially, plans were in the works for a big celebration in which the public would be invited to walk or bike across the new span, but those plans were scrapped after a problem with dozens of anchor bolts on the span left the bridge's opening date up in the air.

Rentschler said he doesn't know if there will be a public celebration anytime in the future.

However, he said, "I think a lot of people here feel as though giving the public access to the bridge is an important thing; the bike path represents that."

 

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Third Suspect in Hunters Point Bus Stop Slaying Pleads Not Guilty

A third person accused in a shooting that killed a 19-year-old man and injured his 17-year-old girlfriend in San Francisco's Hunters Point neighborhood in June pleaded not guilty today to murder charges.

Lee Sullivan, 22, entered the plea in San Francisco Superior Court this morning in connection with the June 24 killing of 19-year-old Jaquan Rice at a bus stop near West Point and Middle Point roads.

Sullivan has been charged with murder, attempted murder, aggravated mayhem, possession of cocaine base for sale and other offenses, prosecutors said. 

He remains in custody on $5 million bail.

Assistant District Attorney Sarah Hawkins said today that Sullivan's case will return to court on Tuesday to link up with those of the other two suspects in the shooting -- Derrick Hunter, 20, and his brother Quincy Hunter, 14, who is being charged as an adult.

The Hunters were arrested in the days after the shooting, and Sullivan was arrested last week, police said.

Police and prosecutors have not disclosed a possible motive for the shooting.

Anyone with information about the case is encouraged to call the Police Department's homicide detail at (415) 553-1145, the department's anonymous tip line at (415) 575-4444 or send a tip by text message to TIP411 with "SFPD" in the message.

 

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Woman Struck by Big-Rig in Bayview District

A woman was seriously injured when she was struck by a big-rig making a U-turn in San Francisco's Bayview District on Wednesday morning, police said today.

The accident was reported at 7:03 a.m. at Bayshore Boulevard and Jerrold Avenue.

The woman, believed to be around 50 years old, suffered a compound fracture to her leg, according to police.

No other details about the incident were immediately available.

 

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Increase BART Traffic Due to Bay Bridge Closure

BART ridership has risen noticeably because of the Bay Bridge closure Wednesday night to allow crews to transition traffic onto the bridge's new eastern span, a BART spokesman said this morning.

BART saw 16,000 more trips made on Wednesday compared to the same day a week ago. Between midnight and 6 a.m. today, there was a jump of nearly 8,000 trips, spokesman Jim Allison said.

He said even higher numbers are expected during peak commute hours today, from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. and between 5 p.m. and 6 p.m.

"We're seeing a lot of new people on BART this morning and seeing lines back up at the ticket machines," Allison said.

He encouraged regular BART users to keep their Clipper cards charged to avoid having to wait in those lines.

Both BART and the California Highway Patrol are urging commuters to be patient during the bridge closure, which is expected to last until 5 a.m. Tuesday.

BART is providing 24-hour service at 14 stations during the closure.

 

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Outages in Pittsburg and San Jose Leave Thousands Without power

Outages in Pittsburg and San Jose are affecting roughly 2,800 PG&E customers this morning.

The outage in Pittsburg was reported at about 6:10 a.m., leaving about 1,050 customers without power, according to PG&E.

In San Jose, the outage was reported about 10 minutes later, at 6:20 a.m., and was affecting roughly 1,750 customers.

Neither of the outages has an estimated time of restoration, according to PG&E.

 

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Thursday Morning News Roundup

 

Bay Bridge Closure Begins 

An era of transbay commuting came to an end Friday night with the closure of the Bay Bridge to transition traffic onto the long-awaited new eastern span.

The closure began at 8 p.m. and started with California Highway Patrol officers running traffic breaks on the bridge to stop vehicles from crossing, CHP Officer Sam Morgan said.

Final work is underway on the new span, which is scheduled to open by 5 a.m. Tuesday, or possibly earlier if the work is done ahead of schedule, Metropolitan Transportation Commission spokesman John Goodwin said.

During the closure, BART is running longer trains today and Friday and providing 24-hour service at more than a dozen stations.

BART officials say they expect a surge in ridership, noting that during previous Bay Bridge closures, trains have carried 30 percent more passengers than usual.

The CHP expects traffic to increase on other Bay Area bridges and advised drivers to expect delays.

"Allowing yourself additional time to get to your destination would be a wise thing to do," Morgan said.

Golden Gate Ferry service is being boosted this Labor Day weekend from Larkspur and Sausalito into San Francisco, and San Francisco Bay Ferry is adding ferries between the East Bay and San Francisco.

Alameda-Contra Costa Transit buses that normally take riders across the bridge will instead go to the MacArthur, Oakland Coliseum, West Oakland and North Berkeley BART stations, agency officials said.

A low-key ceremony celebrating the opening of the new eastern span is tentatively scheduled for 3 p.m. Monday.

A large-scale, public celebration had initially been in the works, but the plan was scrapped after problems with anchor bolts on the new span left the bridge's opening date in limbo.

A temporary fix was since devised to cover the broken rods with an exterior saddle and cable system encased in concrete.

The old eastern span, a cantilever bridge that opened in 1936, has been slated for replacement since the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, which caused a section of the span's upper deck to collapse.

Social media users are expressing nostalgia about the impending bridge closure, with many posting pictures and video on Twitter of their final drives across the old span.

One Twitter user wrote, "Last trip over the ol' bay bridge miss u bb."

Bay Area residents and visitors are advised to call 511 or visit alert.511.org to learn about all of the options for getting around during the closure.
 

50 Year Anniversary of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" Speech


In the fifty years since Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gave his famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington, several Bay Area civil rights advocates believe there has been some progress of racial equality, but the battle is far from done.

On this day in 1964, King was one of a series of speakers at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., where hundreds of thousands rallied to demand equal rights, job opportunities and other racial issues.

The speech, which included the legendary line, "I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character," still influences leaders Wednesday, Oakland-based civil rights attorney John Burris said.

"The impact on me has been profound," the lawyer said. "He has contributed to the life that I've lived."

He said he keeps pictures of King at his home and office to remind him to be as empathetic as the civil rights leaders.

"He judged based upon on who people were," Burris said. "I've used that as a guidepost." Burris represented the family of Oscar Grant III, a black 22-year-old Hayward man who was shot in the back while unarmed on a BART platform by a white transit police officer on New Year's Eve 2009.

He said the Grant shooting and killing of black teenager Trayvon Martin in Florida by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman in 2012 were societal setbacks.

Burris called Wednesday a milestone with King's words continuing as a "guiding light" for the next generation championing for equality.

"Race is still a significant issue in this country and unresolved," he said.

He noted there is ongoing racial disparity in the justice system, which includes racial profiling, higher African-American and other minority incarceration rates, higher death penalty sentences and instances of implementing three-strikes laws.

"Those disparities have powerful consequences on families," Burris said. "It keeps people from being able to participate in the marketplace for jobs."

Looking to the next fifty years, Burris said voting rights for minorities have to be protected, otherwise "real progress cannot be made."

Oren Sellstrom, legal director at the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights of the San Francisco Bay Area, echoed those sentiments about voting rights.

He said that although "no doubt progress has been made" there's "no doubt we've got a lot more work in this country."

A key area he said is restoring voting rights to protect all citizens and their ability to go to the polls.

"The recent (U.S. Supreme Court) decision essentially gutted one of the crown jewels of the civil rights movement," he said.
In June the high court dismantled a portion of the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

"The words that (King) spoke 50 years ago ring true today," he said.

He said the national dialogue has continued to revolve around racial issues including voting rights, affirmative action and most recently the Trayvon Martin shooting and trial.

"We've got a long way to go until we've got full equality in this country," he said.


San Leandro Man Struck and Killed by Car 


A man crossing a San Leandro street on his bicycle was struck by a car and killed Wednesday morning, police said.

The 66-year-old San Leandro resident was crossing Marina Boulevard shortly before 11 a.m. when he was hit by a car, according to San Leandro police Lt. Jeff Tudor.

The bicyclist was taken to a hospital where he was pronounced dead.

The driver stopped at the scene and is cooperating with the investigation, Tudor said.


Study Shows Black Youths in Oakland are Arrested at Disproportionate Rates


A study released Wednesday by the American Civil Liberties Union and two other groups says that black youths in Oakland are being arrested at disproportionate rates by Oakland and school district police.

Christopher Bridges, a racial justice fellow at the ACLU of Northern California, said, "It's my belief that there's some targeting of black youths."

Laura Faer of Public Counsel, a Los Angeles civil rights law firm that helped conduct the study, said, "The data show an extraordinary disproportion in the percentage of arrests" of black youths compared to youths in other ethnic groups.

The report by the Black Organizing Project, an Oakland nonprofit organization, and the two legal groups looked at arrest date over seven years from the Oakland Police Department and two years from Oakland Unified School District police.

The study said between 2006 and 2012 black youths made up 73.5 percent of all juvenile arrests in Oakland even though they comprise just 29.3 percent of the city's youth population.

Similarly, black youths accounted for 73 percent of arrests by school district police over the past two years even though they comprise only 30.5 percent of the school's population, the report said.

Bridges said much smaller percentages of Hispanic and white youths were arrested by Oakland and school district police.

Of the black youths who were arrested, 56.6 percent were not sustained by juvenile probation officials who review cases for prosecution, according to the report.

Faer said the report's authors and community members will come to the Oakland school board's meeting tonight to make several recommendations, including making a greater investment in counselors and mentors and implementing positive behavior intervention and support practices in schools.

Faer said other recommendations are relying on restorative justice models as the first line of intervention for mediating student behavior and developing an agreement between Oakland police and the school district that clearly defines and limits the role of Oakland police in the city's schools.

Faer said black youths who have contact with police are more likely to be arrested in the future and face lifelong difficulties resulting from their time in jail, such as psychological trauma and difficulty in finding work.

Oakland schools spokesman Troy Flint said, "We all acknowledge that the rate of arrest of black males is way too high and we must reduce it" but he doesn't believe the study's statistics support the conclusion that "there's a systematic targeting of black males."

Flint said racism may be an element in the high arrest rate for young black males but he said it's a complex societal problem that also caused by a combination of social, economic, historic and cultural factors.

Flint also said "there's not a tidal wave of law enforcement" at Oakland's schools and "it's not the police state they make it out to be."

In fact, he said there only are 24 Oakland police officers patrolling in and around six of the district's schools under a federal grant program and city and school police only arrested 25 students last year even though there are a total of 35,000 students in the city's public schools.

"That's a really small number," Flint said.

He said the school district already has implemented several programs to help black students.

Flint said an example is that staff in the Office of African American Male Achievement analyze data, track individual students, arrange internships and mentors, promote black male achievements and lead workshops for students and parents.

Flint also said the district has embarked on a program to reduce the number of out-of-school suspensions for African American students by using programs that have alternative punishments for rule breakers.

He added that the fact the issue is being discussed by the school board tonight "shows that the district is taking this seriously."


Bomb Squad Called to Monterey Public Library 


The Monterey police, fire and city manager's offices and some businesses were evacuated for more than three hours Wednesday after a suspicious package was found that turned out to contain only household batteries, police said.

At about 11:25 p.m., city staff at the Monterey Public Library reported seeing a suspicious package left in front of the building at 625 Pacific St., Monterey police Lt. Leslie Sonne said.

A man was seen dropping the package off outside the library, which was not open at the time, and then driving away in a vehicle, Sonne said.
City staffers at the police, fire and city manager's office and employees of some private businesses in the area were ordered evacuated as a precaution, Sonne said.

Police closed down Pacific from El Dorado Street to Jefferson Street while a command post was set up involving the Monterey Airport Fire Department, Sonne said.

At 2:54 p.m., the Monterey County Sheriff's Office's bomb squad used an x-ray device to determine that the package contained household batteries, Sonne said.

The library is a designated battery recycling location, Sonne said.

City staff and the employees of the affected businesses were then permitted to return to work and the streets were reopened to traffic, Sonne said.

People who would like to deposit used batteries for recycling at the library should do so during business hours, Sonne said.


Law Enforcement Cracks Down On Richmond's Most Violent Gangs 


More than 20 alleged members of one of Richmond's most violent street gangs are now behind bars after a joint law enforcement crackdown that combined community policing techniques and a court-authorized wiretap operation, police and prosecutors said Wednesday.

Richmond police officials, Contra Costa County district attorneys, U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration representatives and members of the city's community crime-fighting Ceasefire program gathered at a news conference at the Richmond police station Wednesday to address the operation.

After Richmond saw a spike in violence this spring – including eight murders and 21 shootings in April and May -- police partnered with the district attorney's office and the DEA to launch a wiretap operation in June targeting members of Central Richmond's Deep-C Gang, police said.

During the roughly two-and-a-half-month operation, police monitored suspected gang members' cellphones around the clock to intercept their plans to commit crimes.

Richmond police Chief Chris Magnus said the wiretap allowed law enforcement to listen in on "some incredible and chilling conversations."

In some cases, officers intercepted the suspects as they were en route to carry out plans overheard on the wire to commit murder, Magnus said.

"Lives were saved as a result," the chief said.

Most of the planned shootings were rival Richmond gang members in retaliation for attacks ranging from recent killings of fellow gang members to a perceived insult on Facebook, Magnus said.

"It doesn't take a lot for these kinds of rivalries to heat up," he said.

The operation netted 23 arrests on a variety of charges, including 12 for alleged conspiracy to commit murder.

Officers involved in the operation served 16 search warrants and seized 17 guns, more than $11,000 in cash and 934 grams of promethazine with codeine, according to police.

Police said the wiretap operation built upon the city's Ceasefire program, which focuses on partnerships between community members and police and offers known gang members alternatives to a life of crime.

"It's our job to step in and say, 'Hey, there's another way,'" said Andre Aikins, a Ceasefire coordinator who said that his own life of crime growing up in Oakland helps him understand the mindset of the young offenders he works with in Richmond.

The program, launched in Richmond in 2011, has helped police identify some of the city's most violent offenders.

One component of the program is "call-in" sessions in which Ceasefire representatives meet with known criminals or potential offenders in the community and offer education, work programs and other crime alternatives.

"We realize that change can be difficult, but we're here to work with those individuals," Aikins said.

Police said Ceasefire representatives met with each of the 23 men arrested in connection with Operation Exodus in an attempt to dissuade them from pursuing violent crimes.

When the suspects decided to stay in a gang, police developed "a laser-like focus on their criminal acts" and later arrested them, Magnus said.

The chief stressed that the Ceasefire program has been difficult to carry out, and at times even appeared on the brink of collapse, but has so far proven effective in Richmond.

"It has not been an easy road for us or for the community -- by no means are we claiming, 'Mission Accomplished' here," he said.

As for wiretapping, police and prosecutors Wednesday said Operation Exodus is not the first time Richmond police have used court-approved wiretaps and likely won't be the last, especially as younger generations of gang members come up to fill the power vacuum left by older members in prison.


Death of San Mateo Man in Paddleboarding Accident 

 

A San Mateo man died in a paddleboarding accident on the Nevada side of Lake Tahoe last week, a Nevada Department of Wildlife spokesman said Wednesday.

Kenneth Campo, 42, was part of a group that had rented paddleboards and went out on the water Friday around 3:45 p.m. at Sand Harbor State Park near Incline Village, Nev., department spokesman Ed Lyngar said.

He was about 250 yards offshore when he slipped off the board and began to struggle in the water, Lyngar said.

He was already submerged by the time the people around him got to where he had been, Lyngar said.

An employee of one of the paddleboard rental companies based onshore dived down 20 feet and retrieved Campo and brought him to shore.

Paramedics were waiting there and brought him to a hospital where he was pronounced dead, Lyngar said.

He had a life vest and a foot leash on the boat that were both not in use during the accident, Lyngar said.

"Life jacket use on these devices is far too low," Lyngar said. Often tourists and recreational boaters "don't realize the inherent dangers."

An investigation is ongoing, but Lyngar said it appears that this was a "tragic accident."

 

Santa Cruz Surf Instructor Jailed on Child Sex Abuse Charges 

 


Investigators discovered that a one-time surfing teacher currently jailed on child sex abuse charges took inappropriate photos of young girls at Santa Cruz High School, police said Wednesday.

Santa Cruz police alleged that Dylan Greiner, 38, took pictures of girls while a special guest for "Pool Jr. Guard" programs run by the Seahorse Swim School in Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz police Deputy Chief Steve Clark said.

The Seahorse Swim School had been running the programs out of the swimming pool at the campus of Santa Cruz High School, where it rented the pool for swim classes, Clark said.

Santa Cruz City Schools, which oversees the public high school, was not affiliated with the swim school and was not responsible for its employees or volunteers, Clark said.

Greiner, 38, who taught children how to surf at two other Santa Cruz schools, was charged last Wednesday with 28 criminal charges including four felony charges of lewd and lascivious behavior on a minor and felony child pornography allegations.

The operators of the Seahorse Swim School have been cooperating completely with the police investigation, Clark said.

Greiner also allegedly took inappropriate photos of young girls while he taught surfing at the Santa Cruz Surf School, which he owned, and the Boys and Girls Club in Santa Cruz, Clark said.

Police have identified more than a dozen female victims whose photos were taken at the three schools during a review of photographs and videos stored on computers owned by Greiner, Clark said.

Detectives uncovered a cache of more than 500,000 digital photos and videos allegedly taken by Greiner, Clark said.

Police believe that Greiner used a video camera and a still camera with a zoom lens to take inappropriate images of young girls, including their crotch areas, Clark said.

Last Wednesday at Greiner's arraignment on the 28 charges, a judge set bail for the former teacher, held at the Santa Cruz County Jail, at $1 million, according to the Santa Cruz County District Attorney's Office.

The four counts of lewd and lascivious behavior stem from Greiner's actions involving one girl while she was 14 and after she turned 15, prosecutors said.

Greiner is also charged with five felony counts of possessing child pornography, 11 felony counts of using a minor to create child pornography, one felony count of distributing lewd material to a minor and two felony counts of duplicating child pornography, according to prosecutors.

He further faces five counts of misdemeanor invasion of privacy for allegedly secretly taking images of children while they undressed in a changing, fitting or other room, prosecutors said.

After he appeared in Superior Court in Santa Cruz last week, a judge continued Greiner's arraignment hearing to Sept. 10, prosecutors said.

Police have fielded more than 100 inquiries from parents about their children and there may be hundreds of victims in the case, Clark said.


Weather Forecast

Mostly cloudy skies and patchy fog are expected in the Bay Area this morning. Highs are likely to be in the 60s to lower 70s, with southwest winds up to 10 mph.

Partly cloudy skies are expected this evening, becoming cloudy with patchy fog after midnight. Lows are likely to be in the upper 50s, with westerly winds up to 20 mph.

Cloudy skies and patchy fog are likely Friday morning. Highs are expected to be in the 60s to lower 70s, with westerly winds up to 20 mph.

 

 

 

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Local Civil Rights Leaders Reflect On 50 Years Since MLK Gave 'I Have A Dream' Speech

In the fifty years since Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gave his famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington, several Bay Area civil rights advocates believe there has been some progress of racial equality, but the battle is far from done.

On this day in 1964, King was one of a series of speakers at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., where hundreds of thousands rallied to demand equal rights, job opportunities and other racial issues.

The speech, which included the legendary line, "I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character," still influences leaders today, Oakland-based civil rights attorney John Burris said.

"The impact on me has been profound," the lawyer said. "He has contributed to the life that I've lived."

He said he keeps pictures of King at his home and office to remind him to be as empathetic as the civil rights leaders.

"He judged based upon on who people were," Burris said. "I've used that as a guidepost."

Burris represented the family of Oscar Grant III, a black 22-year-old Hayward man who was shot in the back while unarmed on a BART platform by a white transit police officer on New Year's Eve 2009.

He said the Grant shooting and killing of black teenager Trayvon Martin in Florida by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman in 2012 were societal setbacks.

Burris called today a milestone with King's words continuing as a "guiding light" for the next generation championing for equality.

"Race is still a significant issue in this country and unresolved," he said.

He noted there is ongoing racial disparity in the justice system, which includes racial profiling, higher African-American and other minority incarceration rates, higher death penalty sentences and instances of implementing three-strikes laws.

"Those disparities have powerful consequences on families," Burris said. "It keeps people from being able to participate in the marketplace for jobs."

Looking to the next fifty years, Burris said voting rights for minorities have to be protected, otherwise "real progress cannot be made."

Oren Sellstrom, legal director at the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights of the San Francisco Bay Area, echoed those sentiments about voting rights.

He said that although "no doubt progress has been made" there's "no doubt we've got a lot more work in this country."

A key area he said is restoring voting rights to protect all citizens and their ability to go to the polls.

"The recent (U.S. Supreme Court) decision essentially gutted one of the crown jewels of the civil rights movement," he said.

In June the high court dismantled a portion of the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

"The words that (King) spoke 50 years ago ring true today," he said.

He said the national dialogue has continued to revolve around racial issues including voting rights, affirmative action and most recently the Trayvon Martin shooting and trial.

"We've got a long way to go until we've got full equality in this country," he said.

He noted that while there has been progress in other fronts, the over-incarceration of black men and other minority groups, is going in reverse.

"This has grown worse in the past 50 years," he said. "It has been devastating in many ways."

"If we are going to have true equality we have to stop warehousing entire communities in the criminal justice system," he continued.

Dan Hoffman, who co-founded the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Association of Santa Clara Valley 30 years ago, said today is about commemorating King "who was the champion of equal rights" and believed African-Americans are "just as entitled of the fruits of democracy as much as anyone else."

Hoffman recalled King's focus on economic democracy and fighting for jobs for blacks -- an issue that persists today with higher rates of unemployment of African-Americans. Hoffman said racial discrimination that continues today "is simply staggering."

The 87-year-old Saratoga resident said he believes the main issue is promoting respect for everyone who "all deserve the same basic rights."

"I think that it's very difficult for white people like me to fully appreciate the apprehension that African-Americans have throughout the day that they will be disrespected in a minor or major way," Hoffman said.

He said a small percentage of the country is actively fighting to keep minorities from their full rights.

"They do a lot of harm," he said, and pinpointed limited voting rights as debilitating the African-American community.

"All kinds of people who have less money and less status, different colors, nationalities, minorities, poor people," he said. "These are the victims of the effort to restrict voting rights for cheap political advantage."

Hoffman said he believes if King were alive today he would be at the forefront of this issue.

Since King spoke on behalf of freedom and equality, Hoffman said there have been advances for African-Americans whether it is more of a presence in Congress, as political and civic leaders, within the entertainment industry, and other leading fields.

"If (King) was still alive, he'd say: 'You've done well but there's a long way to go,'" Hoffman said.

This afternoon President Barack Obama spoke at the same site where King gave his speech on this day in 1963.

Obama commented on King's legacy and the significance of the anniversary of the civil rights march and rally.

"Because they marched, the civil rights law was passed. Because they marched, the voting rights law was signed. Because they marched, doors of opportunity and education swung open so their daughters and sons could finally imagine a life for themselves beyond washing somebody else's laundry or shining somebody else's shoes," Obama said.

He continued, "Because they marched, city councils changed and state legislatures changed and Congress changed and, yes, eventually the White House changed."

The president remarked on the progress the civil rights movement made not just for African-Americans but all citizens.

"America changed for you and for me," Obama said.

 

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San Mateo Man Drowns In Lake Tahoe Paddleboarding Accident

A San Mateo man died in a paddleboarding accident on the Nevada side of Lake Tahoe last week, a Nevada Department of Wildlife spokesman said today.

Kenneth Campo, 42, was part of a group that had rented paddleboards and went out on the water Friday around 3:45 p.m. at Sand Harbor State Park near Incline Village, Nev., department spokesman Ed Lyngar said.

He was about 250 yards offshore when he slipped off the board and began to struggle in the water, Lyngar said.

He was already submerged by the time the people around him got to where he had been, Lyngar said.

An employee of one of the paddleboard rental companies based onshore dived down 20 feet and retrieved Campo and brought him to shore.

Paramedics were waiting there and brought him to a hospital where he was pronounced dead, Lyngar said.

He had a life vest and a foot leash on the boat that were both not in use during the accident, Lyngar said.

"Life jacket use on these devices is far too low," Lyngar said.

Often tourists and recreational boaters "don't realize the inherent dangers."

An investigation is ongoing, but Lyngar said it appears that this was a "tragic accident."

 

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Jury Begins Deliberations In Trial Of Former Deputy Accused In 'Dirty DUI' Sting

A federal jury began deliberating in San Francisco today in the case of a former Contra Costa County sheriff's deputy accused of arranging three so-called "dirty DUI" arrests in Danville in 2010 and 2011.

The jury in the trial of former deputy Stephen Tanabe started deliberations shortly before noon, after defense attorney Tim Pori rested his case without presenting witnesses and after closing arguments.

Tanabe, 50, of Alamo, is accused of aiding former private investigator Christopher Butler in drunken driving stings targeting husbands of female clients of Butler's who were seeking an advantage in divorce and custody cases.

He faces charges of conspiracy to deprive Contra Costa County of his honest services, wire fraud and extortion.

Prosecutors allege he received cocaine and a Glock gun from Butler in exchange for the arrests.

Butler was one of two leaders, along with former narcotics squad commander Norman Wielsch, of a wide-ranging Contra Costa County police corruption scandal that included stealing and selling drug evidence, making phony arrests, and extorting protection payments from workers in a massage parlor the two men established.

Butler, 52, of Concord, pleaded guilty last year to seven charges, was sentenced to eight years in prison, and was a key prosecution witness against Tanabe in testimony this week.

Tanabe is accused only in connection with three drunken-driving arrests outside Danville bars on Nov. 2, 2010, and Jan. 9 and 14, 2011.

Butler, the sting victims and women who worked for Butler as decoys all testified that the targeted men were lured to meetings at Danville bars where they were enticed by Butler employees to become intoxicated.

When the men drove off, Butler alerted Tanabe, according to Butler.

Tanabe summoned a fellow officer to make the first arrest, on a night that Tanabe was off-duty, and personally made the second and third arrests.

Pori told the jury in statements at the start and close of the trial in the court of U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer that Butler is a liar and "prolific con man" who had an incentive to incriminate Tanabe to obtain a sentence reduction.

The defense attorney contended that Tanabe was carrying out his duties and that there is no evidence, other than Butler's testimony, that Tanabe received cocaine from him and no proof that a gun that he did receive was in payment for the arrests.

In addition to conspiracy, the charges against Tanabe include three counts of wire fraud and three counts of extortion under color of official right.

The wire fraud charges stem from text messages allegedly exchanged by Tanabe and Butler and the extortion charges pertain to the alleged payment of cocaine and the gun for carrying out official duties.

 

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Wednesday Midday News Roundup

Transit Agencies Prep For Bay Bridge Closure As Motorists Grow Nostalgic

An era of transbay commuting is coming to an end tonight with the closure of the Bay Bridge to transition traffic onto the long-awaited new eastern span.

The closure begins at 8 p.m. and will start with California Highway Patrol officers running traffic breaks on the bridge to stop vehicles from crossing, CHP Officer Sam Morgan said.

Once the bridge is cleared, crews will begin final work on the new span, which is scheduled to open by 5 a.m. Tuesday, or possibly earlier if the work is done ahead of schedule, Metropolitan Transportation Commission spokesman John Goodwin said.

During the closure, BART is running longer trains on Thursday and Friday and providing 24-hour service at more than a dozen stations.

BART officials say they expect a surge in ridership, noting that during previous Bay Bridge closures, trains have carried 30 percent more passengers than usual.

The CHP expects traffic to increase on other Bay Area bridges and advised drivers to expect delays.

"Allowing yourself additional time to get to your destination would be a wise thing to do," Morgan said.

Golden Gate Ferry service is being boosted this Labor Day weekend from Larkspur and Sausalito into San Francisco, and San Francisco Bay Ferry is adding ferries between the East Bay and San Francisco.

Alameda-Contra Costa Transit buses that normally take riders across the bridge will instead go to the MacArthur, Oakland Coliseum, West Oakland and North Berkeley BART stations, agency officials said.

A low-key ceremony celebrating the opening of the new eastern span is tentatively scheduled for 3 p.m. Monday.

A large-scale, public celebration had initially been in the works, but the plan was scrapped after problems with anchor bolts on the new span left the bridge's opening date in limbo.

A temporary fix was since devised to cover the broken rods with an exterior saddle and cable system encased in concrete.

The old eastern span, a cantilever bridge that opened in 1936, has been slated for replacement since the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, which caused a section of the span's upper deck to collapse.

Social media users are expressing nostalgia about the impending bridge closure, with many posting pictures and video on Twitter of their final drives across the old span.

One Twitter user wrote, "Last trip over the ol' bay bridge miss u bb."

Bay Area residents and visitors are advised to call 511 or visit alert.511.org to learn about all of the options for getting around during the closure.

Old Eastern Span Of Bay Bridge To Take Three Years To Dismantle

Even though it will be closed for good tonight, the old eastern span of the Bay Bridge won't be disappearing from view anytime soon -- bridge officials say it will take about three years to dismantle the seismically unsafe span.

The old cantilever eastern span was built in 1936 to connect Oakland to Yerba Buena Island.

After years of delays after the Loma Prieta quake, it is finally closing and will be replaced by a new self-anchored suspension bridge opening next week.

But while a building on land can be demolished fairly quickly, the bridge's location over the Bay requires the painstaking removal of the span piece by piece.

Bay Bridge spokesman Andrew Gordon said the demolition can begin "as soon as traffic is off the bridge" and should be completed by 2016.

Crews will begin taking apart the bridge from west to east, starting with the temporary S-curve installed in 2009, and then moving east along the cantilever section toward Oakland, Gordon said.

The project will use the plans for the old bridge to help crews take it apart, Gordon said.

"We're studying the blueprints of how the bridge got built to use that as a guide to how to basically take it apart," he said.

Bridge officials say the demolition work must be done with great care because it will be performed within close proximity of moving vehicle traffic on the new span, as well as a new bike and pedestrian pathway on the bridge.

Gordon said Silverado Contractors Inc. and California Engineering Contractors Inc. are carrying out the project.

The two East Bay-based companies both have experience working on the Bay Bridge project, as well as the replacement of the old Carquinez Bridge near Vallejo.

Metropolitan Transportation Commission spokesman John Goodwin said authorities do not anticipate drivers being distracted by the dismantling work, citing the Carquinez Bridge project as a similar example.

"To a large degree, people are used to it," Goodwin said. "It's pretty slow work, cutting loose one piece at a time, so you're not seeing an entire section of bridge coming down at one time."

He said the current cost forecast for the demolition project is $233.7 million, which is part of the overall $6.4 billion cost of the bridge replacement.

Two SF Ministers Recall Experiences At March On Washington

With the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington occurring today, two high-profile San Francisco ministers who participated in the 1963 march and rally remembered their experiences.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gave his famous "I Have a Dream" speech that day in front of the Lincoln Memorial, and the Revs. Amos Brown and Cecil Williams were there to hear it.

Brown, president of the San Francisco chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and pastor at Third Baptist Church, called the march the "zenith" of the civil rights movement.

Brown was a student at Morehouse College in Georgia and said he was in the only class King taught in his life.

He was arrested along with King at a student sit-in in Atlanta in the years prior to the march, and drove a busload of students up from Atlanta for the big event.

Williams, the founder and minister of Glide Memorial United Methodist Church in San Francisco, recalled coming from Kansas City for the march and being inspired by what he saw.

"It was just uplifting," he said. "It was really the first time I had felt that strongly about what I had to do as an African-American."

Williams said he was just to the left of the Lincoln Memorial as King and other speakers addressed the crowd.

"As far as I could see, it was just a sea of humanity," he said.

He said participating in the march and listening to the speeches "was probably one of the most important events in my life to spur me on and give me direction."

Brown has been back in Washington since last week and is taking part in the large 50th anniversary event there today.

President Barack Obama is speaking at the event.

In San Francisco tonight, an event is planned at City Hall to honor Clarence Benjamin Jones, a former speechwriter, attorney and adviser to King.

Jones will be given a lifetime achievement award by the city's Human Rights Commission at 5 p.m.

Palo Alto is also organizing a celebration in its City Hall Plaza, which in 2007 was renamed King Plaza in honor of Coretta Scott King.

The event will feature a 5 p.m. showing of the documentary "Soundtrack for a Revolution," followed by music and oratory performances at 7 p.m.

Massive Fairfield Fire Damages 15 Homes, Displaces 5 Families

Five homes were all but destroyed and 10 more were damaged by a stubborn seven-alarm fire in Fairfield on Tuesday, a fire battalion chief said.

The fire was reported in the 2800 block of Marigold Drive, near Interstate Highway 80, at about 3:45 p.m., fire officials said.

About 50 people were evacuated as firefighters fought the blaze, which was contained around 6:30 p.m., fire Battalion Chief Matt Luckenbach said.

In addition to the five homes deemed uninhabitable, 10 sustained minor to moderate damage including broken doors and windows, the battalion chief said.

Fire officials said the blaze appears to have started in the grass along the highway and then rapidly spread to homes along Marigold Drive, which is parallel to the roadway.

The flames consumed at least a dozen yards, and vegetation behind the homes -- including palm trees, cypress trees and pine needles -- appears to have fueled the flames, he said.

The fire displaced five families.

One of the families accepted temporary housing assistance from the American Red Cross, while the others made other arrangements, Luckenbach said.

No injuries were reported. Luckenbach said fire crews remained at the scene this morning to monitor hot spots along with investigators who are trying to determine what caused the fire.

No damage estimate from the fire was immediately available, but Luckenbach said it would likely be well over $1 million.

Crews from Contra Costa County, Yolo County and Cal Fire assisted the Fairfield Fire Department in battling the blaze.

Antioch Police Shoot, Kill Vallejo Man Who Allegedly Pointed Gun At Officers

Police shot and killed a man in Antioch on Tuesday after he allegedly led them on a chase and pointed a handgun at officers, a police captain said this morning.

Police identified the man as 24-year-old Korey Marcel Germaine, of Vallejo.

At about 4:45 p.m. Tuesday, officers responded to reports of someone in a Mercedes brandishing a gun, Capt. Leonard Orman said.

Police found Germaine driving the vehicle and attempted to pull the car over but he sped away, sparking a pursuit, police said.

During the chase, Germaine hit a police patrol car and a civilian vehicle, Orman said.

He later lost control of the Mercedes, which ended up in the dirt near the intersection of Hillcrest Avenue and Wildflower Drive, next to the Crossings Shopping Center, according to police.

Police said Germaine ran from the car carrying a handgun, and officers chased him.

At least one officer opened fire when Germaine allegedly pointed a gun at the officers, according to police.

Germaine was shot several times and was pronounced dead at the scene, police said.

No officers were injured.

Police did not say how many officers were involved in the shooting, which is being investigated by Antioch police, the Contra Costa County District Attorney's Office and the Contra Costa County Forensics and Crime Lab.

SFPUC Officials Say Water Quality Still Unaffected By Rim Fire

San Francisco Public Utilities Commission officials said today that the city's water supply in the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir is still unaffected by the massive Rim Fire that continues to burn in and around Yosemite National Park.

The blaze, which started Aug. 17 and has charred more than 187,000 acres, reached the area around the reservoir this week, SFPUC spokesman Tyrone Jue said.

The water, which supplies 2.6 million customers in San Francisco and elsewhere in the Bay Area, has maintained the same turbidity, or cloudiness, it had before the fire, according to the commission.

The fire is burning on the south side of the reservoir, and Jue said the rocky terrain around Hetch Hetchy is preventing adverse impacts.

"There's not much vegetation around the perimeter of the reservoir," he said. "It's basically in a giant granite bowl."

Some ash has fallen on the surface of the reservoir, but the water sent to San Francisco is withdrawn from 260 feet below the surface, according to the commission.

Jue said that although the drinking water supply has not been affected so far, the SFPUC could have to deal with erosion problems if the flames reach deeper into the Hetch Hetchy watershed.

Winter or spring runoff could affect water quality, he said.

"That's where you might have more of an issue," Jue said.

He said if a problem arises, the SFPUC will "make the appropriate adjustments to the system."

The commission recently began increasing the amount of water delivered to the Bay Area to maximize the supply stored locally, and also has agreements with other nearby utilities if supplements are needed.

SFPUC crews are also working to repair hydroelectric facilities that were damaged by the fire last week.

All of San Francisco's municipal electric customers continue to be fully supplied, according to the commission.

The Rim Fire had burned 187,466 acres as of this morning and was only 23 percent contained, according to the U.S. Forest Service.

The cause of the fire remains under investigation.

Santa Clara County Voters Renew Parcel Tax To Fund Libraries

Voters in nine cities and unincorporated areas of Santa Clara County on Tuesday overwhelmingly passed Measure A, a parcel tax that will continue funding libraries for the next 20 years.

Of the 55,022 residents who cast votes in the all-mail election, 81 percent favored maintaining the annual tax, which has been in place for most of the past two decades, according county Registrar of Voters.

The tally exceeded the two-thirds approval required for Measure A to pass.

The initiative essentially renews a similar measure originally passed in 1994 and since reauthorized by voters that was set to expire this year.

The tax is levied on homes and property, and the rates will stay the same under Measure A, meaning owners of single-family homes and condominiums will continue to pay $33.66 per year, deputy county librarian Carol Frost said.

The $6.2 million raised through the tax each year accounts for 18 percent of the Santa Clara County Library District's budget.

The district is governed by the Library Joint Powers Authority of Santa Clara County's board, Frost said.

The money will be used to purchase up-to-date books and research materials; provide children's reading programs and mobile book services for seniors and the disabled; maintain library hours; retain qualified librarians, and other library services, according to the measure.

The district includes unincorporated areas of the county and the cities of Campbell, Cupertino, Gilroy, Los Altos, Los Altos Hills, Milpitas, Monte Sereno, Morgan Hill and Saratoga, according to the district's website.

The measure will also renew taxes levied on non-residential properties, which range from $84.15 to $252.50 per acre annually, according to the library district.

The Registrar of Voters mailed out about 204,000 ballots to district voters for the special election starting in July, registrar spokeswoman Shannon Bushey said.

Appeals Court Leaves State Shark Fin Ban In Place

A federal appeals court in San Francisco refused to block a California law Tuesday that bans the possession and sale of shark fins that are detached from shark bodies.

Two Asian-American groups claim the law, which went fully into effect on July 1, discriminates against Chinese Americans because it prevents them from engaging in the traditional cultural practice of eating shark fin soup at ceremonial occasions.

A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a decision in which U.S. District Judge Phyllis Hamilton of Oakland declined to issue a preliminary injunction suspending the ban.

The appeals court said the two groups "presented no persuasive evidence indicating that the California Legislature's real intent was to discriminate against Chinese Americans rather than to accomplish the law's stated humanitarian, conservationist and health goals."

The case now goes back to Hamilton's court for further proceedings, including a possible full trial on whether there should be a permanent injunction against the law.

The court said that other issues in the case, including U.S. government claims that the law may interfere with federal management of fisheries, could be considered during the further proceedings.

The purpose of the law, according to the Legislature, is to "help ensure that sharks do not become extinct as a result of shark finning."

Shark finning is the practice of catching a shark, cutting off the fins, and throwing the body of the fish back into the water to die.

The law went partially into effect on January 1, but allowed restaurants and individuals to use or sell previously legally obtained fins until July 1.

It was challenged in a lawsuit filed against state officials last year by the San Francisco-based Chinatown Neighborhood Association and the Burlingame-based Asian Americans for Political Advancement.

A lawyer for the two organizations was not immediately available for comment Tuesday.

The Humane Society of the United States, which became a party in the case to join the state in defending the law, applauded the decision.

Jennifer Fearing, the society's California senior state director, said, "The new shark fin law is a critical tool in eliminating the market for shark fins in California and ending our state's role in facilitating this cruel and wasteful practice."

Alice's Now And Zen Festival In Golden Gate Park Announces 2013 Headliners

The Goo Goo Dolls and Plain White T's are among the bands set to perform at Alice's Now and Zen 2013 music festival in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park this September, festival organizers announced today.

The free concert, to be held on Sunday, Sept. 29, will also feature the bands One Republic and Walk Off The Earth.

The on-air staff from Radio Alice@97.3 will introduce the bands during the 15th annual one-day festival, held in Golden Gate Park's Sharon Meadows, near JFK and Kezar drives, according to festival organizers.

From noon to 5 p.m. on Sept. 29, festival-goers of all ages are invited to listen to live musicians, eat gourmet food and are encouraged to utilize the free bike valet at the festival's main entrance.

Contra Costa County To Test New Community Alert System Tonight

Contra Costa County will test its community warning system this evening to ensure the efficacy of its newest telephone alert system vendor.

Residents of cities throughout the county are set to receive automated phone calls this evening as part of the test.

The phone calls are scheduled to go out at 5:30 p.m. to homes and businesses in Pittsburg and Antioch near the Dow Chemical facility; at 6 p.m. to areas in Martinez and Pacheco near the Shell oil refinery; at 6:30 p.m. to neighborhoods near the Philips 66 oil refinery in Crockett and Rodeo; and at 7 p.m. to parts of Richmond and San Pablo near the Chevron refinery, according to the sheriff's office.

Some residents will get callbacks asking them to participate in a brief survey to gauge how well the phone alert system worked, sheriff's officials said.

 

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SFPUC Officials Say Water Quality Still Unaffected By Rim Fire

San Francisco Public Utilities Commission officials said today that the city's water supply in the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir is still unaffected by the massive Rim Fire that continues to burn in and around Yosemite National Park.

The blaze, which started Aug. 17 and has charred more than 187,000 acres, reached the area around the reservoir this week, SFPUC spokesman Tyrone Jue said.

The water, which supplies 2.6 million customers in San Francisco and elsewhere in the Bay Area, has maintained the same turbidity, or cloudiness, it had before the fire, according to the commission.

The fire is burning on the south side of the reservoir, and Jue said the rocky terrain around Hetch Hetchy is preventing adverse impacts.

"There's not much vegetation around the perimeter of the reservoir," he said. "It's basically in a giant granite bowl."

Some ash has fallen on the surface of the reservoir, but the water sent to San Francisco is withdrawn from 260 feet below the surface, according to the commission.

Jue said that although the drinking water supply has not been affected so far, the SFPUC could have to deal with erosion problems if the flames reach deeper into the Hetch Hetchy watershed.

Winter or spring runoff could affect water quality, he said.

"That's where you might have more of an issue," Jue said.

He said if a problem arises, the SFPUC will "make the appropriate adjustments to the system."

The commission recently began increasing the amount of water delivered to the Bay Area to maximize the supply stored locally, and also has agreements with other nearby utilities if supplements are needed.

SFPUC crews are also working to repair hydroelectric facilities that were damaged by the fire last week.

All of San Francisco's municipal electric customers continue to be fully supplied, according to the commission.

The Rim Fire had burned 187,466 acres as of this morning and was only 23 percent contained, according to the U.S. Forest Service.

The cause of the fire remains under investigation.

 

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Transit Agencies Prep For Bay Bridge Closure As Motorists Grow Nostalgic

An era of transbay commuting is coming to an end tonight with the closure of the Bay Bridge to transition traffic onto the long-awaited new eastern span.

The closure begins at 8 p.m. and will start with California Highway Patrol officers running traffic breaks on the bridge to stop vehicles from crossing, CHP Officer Sam Morgan said.

Once the bridge is cleared, crews will begin final work on the new span, which is scheduled to open by 5 a.m. Tuesday, or possibly earlier if the work is done ahead of schedule, Metropolitan Transportation Commission spokesman John Goodwin said.

During the closure, BART is running longer trains on Thursday and Friday and providing 24-hour service at more than a dozen stations.

BART officials say they expect a surge in ridership, noting that during previous Bay Bridge closures, trains have carried 30 percent more passengers than usual.

The CHP expects traffic to increase on other Bay Area bridges and advised drivers to expect delays.

"Allowing yourself additional time to get to your destination would be a wise thing to do," Morgan said.

Golden Gate Ferry service is being boosted this Labor Day weekend from Larkspur and Sausalito into San Francisco, and San Francisco Bay Ferry is adding ferries between the East Bay and San Francisco.

Alameda-Contra Costa Transit buses that normally take riders across the bridge will instead go to the MacArthur, Oakland Coliseum, West Oakland and North Berkeley BART stations, agency officials said.

A low-key ceremony celebrating the opening of the new eastern span is tentatively scheduled for 3 p.m. Monday.

A large-scale, public celebration had initially been in the works, but the plan was scrapped after problems with anchor bolts on the new span left the bridge's opening date in limbo.

A temporary fix was since devised to cover the broken rods with an exterior saddle and cable system encased in concrete.

The old eastern span, a cantilever bridge that opened in 1936, has been slated for replacement since the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, which caused a section of the span's upper deck to collapse.

Social media users are expressing nostalgia about the impending bridge closure, with many posting pictures and video on Twitter of their final drives across the old span.

One Twitter user wrote, "Last trip over the ol' bay bridge miss u bb."

Bay Area residents and visitors are advised to call 511 or visit alert.511.org to learn about all of the options for getting around during the closure.

 

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15-Year-Old Boy Robbed In Outer Mission Tuesday Evening

A 15-year-old boy was pushed to the ground and robbed in San Francisco's Outer Mission neighborhood on Tuesday evening by two suspects who were arrested a short time later, according to police.

The robbery was reported at 6:48 p.m. near Alemany Boulevard and Niagara Avenue.

The teen was walking down the street when the suspects approached and asked him what time it was, police said.

When the victim responded, one of the suspects asked if he had a cellphone.

When the teen said no, the second suspect pushed him to the ground, grabbed his wallet from his pocket and the pair fled, according to police.

Officers responded and spotted the suspects, two men about 20 years old, and took them into custody, police said.

Their names have not yet been released. The teen was not injured in the robbery.

 

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Alice's Now And Zen Festival In Golden Gate Park Announces 2013 Headliners

Goo Goo Dolls and Plain White T's are among the bands set to perform at Alice's Now and Zen 2013 music festival in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park this September, according to festival organizers.

The free concert, to be held on Sunday, Sept. 29, will also feature the bands One Republic and Walk Off The Earth.

The on-air staff from Radio Alice@97.3 will introduce the bands during the 15th annual one-day festival, held in Golden Gate Park's Sharon Meadows, near JFK and Kezar drives, according to festival organizers.

From noon to 5 p.m. on Sept 29., festival-goers of all ages are invited to listen to live musicians, eat gourmet food and are encouraged to utilize the free bike valet at the festival's main entrance.

 

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Check out some of our most popular blogs:

     We Built a Stronger SF Economy on Smart Government Investments

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Wednesday Morning News Roundup

Firefighters To Remain Overnight At Scene Of Fire That Burned 5 Homes In Fairfield

Firefighters planned to remain overnight on the scene of a massive fire that destroyed two houses and burned three more in Fairfield Tuesday afternoon, fire officials said.

As of Tuesday night the seven-alarm fire on Marigold Drive near Interstate Highway 80 was 70 percent contained but about 50 residents in the area remained evacuated, Fairfield fire spokesman Bob Silva said.

The fire started in grass along Interstate Highway 80 at about 3:40 p.m. and quickly spread to homes along parallel Marigold Drive, according to fire officials.

A total of five homes were burned in the fire and two were completely destroyed, Spears said.

About 50 residents were evacuated in total along Marigold Drive, and North Texas Street was closed between Dickson Hill Road and Atlantic Avenue, Silva said.

An evacuation center has been established at Fairfield High School at 205 E. Atlantic Ave. where the Red Cross is offering evacuees assistance, Silva said.

The fire forced the closure of two lanes of eastbound Highway 80 until shortly before 5 p.m., according to the California Highway Patrol.

About 200 firefighters from Cal Fire and Solano, Yolo, Contra Costa and Napa counties responded to the blaze, Silva said.

Transit Agencies To Boost Service While Bay Bridge Closed

Bay Area transit agencies said Tuesday that they will beef up service while the Bay Bridge is closed over Labor Day weekend but also said people should be prepared and research all their travel options during the closure.

"We encourage everyone to plan ahead and allow more time to get where they need to go," Bay Bridge spokesman Andrew Gordon said.

BART spokesman Jim Allison said, "People should do a little research and load up their Clipper Card ahead of time so they don't have to wait in line to buy tickets because we expect very busy ridership days" when the bridge is closed, especially on Thursday and Friday.

Caltrans is closing the Bay Bridge in both directions starting at 8 p.m. today to complete additional work that must be finished before the new eastern span can be opened to the driving public.

Caltrans tentatively is planning to re-open the bridge at 5 a.m. on Tuesday but may re-open it before then if the work is completed early.

However, Gordon said Caltrans cannot promise that the span will open early, saying, "The bridge will open when it's ready."

Allison said BART will try to fill part of the gap caused by the bridge closure by running longer trains on Thursday and Friday and having 24-hour service at 14 stations.

However, BART won't provide overnight service from Monday night into Tuesday morning because it needs to close its tracks for a short period to perform maintenance work and inspections and it's expecting the bridge to be reopened by that time, Allison said.

He said the transit agency's overnight trains will operate hourly on a two-route modified "X" service, with trains between Concord and San Francisco International Airport forming one line of the X and trains between El Cerrito del Norte and Dublin/Pleasanton forming the other line.

Allison said all trains will meet at MacArthur Station in Oakland, where passengers may transfer to reach any of the 14 stations that will be open around the clock.

He said BART expects its ridership to increase significantly because its ridership has surged by up to 30 percent during past Bay Bridge closures.

AC Transit spokesman Clarence Johnson said the bus agency won't be able to provide transbay service while the span is closed so its transbay buses instead will stop at four BART stations to drop off passengers going to San Francisco and pick up passengers coming from San Francisco.

Those stations are MacArthur, the Oakland Coliseum, West Oakland and North Berkeley, Johnson said.

He said many local buses operated by AC Transit, which serves parts of Alameda and Contra Costa counties, also bring riders to BART stations as part of their regular service.

San Francisco Bay Ferry spokesman Ernest Sanchez said his agency will also increase its service while the Bay Bridge is closed.

Sanchez said there will be expanded service from San Francisco Bay Ferry's terminals in Oakland, Alameda Main Street, Harbor Bay in Alameda, Vallejo and San Francisco.

He said there also will be direct service between Alameda Main Street and San Francisco and Oakland and San Francisco.

Normally Alameda Main Street and Oakland share a boat. "We're staffed and ready to go," Sanchez said.

Teen Killed In Car Crash Was On Way Home From Fishing With Friends In Danville

San Ramon Valley High School student Robert Orlando was riding in a car with two friends in Danville on their way home from a fishing trip when his life was cut short in a sudden crash.

The 17-year-old was scheduled to begin his senior year Tuesday and wanted to go fishing -- one of his many passions -- one last time before the school year started, said longtime family friend Richard Hein.

"He had more passion, more energy and more gregariousness by far than your average person or average two people," said Hein. "He just had a zest and a presence."

Around 8:50 p.m. Monday, Robert and his two friends, also 17-year-old San Ramon Valley High seniors, were heading north on El Capitan Drive near Claridge Drive when, for unknown reasons, the car went off of the roadway and struck a tree.

Emergency responders took Robert to San Ramon Regional Medical Center where he was later pronounced dead.

Police said the driver suffered broken ribs and the second passenger suffered a broken leg in the crash.

Both were listed in stable condition Tuesday at John Muir Medical Center in Walnut Creek. Drugs or alcohol do not appear to have been factors in the crash, which remains under investigation, according to police.

Robert is survived by his parents and two brothers. The family is shocked and devastated by the loss, Hein said.

Tuesday, some 50 community members visited the family's Danville home, he said. Meanwhile, flowers, cards and other tokens were accumulating at a makeshift memorial at the site of the crash Tuesday.

A memorial service will likely take place sometime next week.

The family asks that any friends who wish to send messages, or photos or videos of Robert email them to weloverobert2013@gmail.com.

'Operation Exodus' Disables Violent Deep-C Street Gang In Richmond

Twenty-three alleged gang members have been arrested by local and federal authorities as part of "Operation Exodus," a summer crackdown aimed at Richmond's violent Deep-C gang.

The roughly two-and-a-half-month operation began in June after a particularly bloody couple of months in the city, police said Tuesday.

There were five murders in Richmond in April and three in May, and a total of 21 shootings happened during that time, Richmond police Capt. Mark Gagan said.

"Many of the murders were broad daylight, execution-style, which shocked and devastated our community," Gagan said.

Not all of the killings were related, but Gagan said that as police investigated the deaths, the Deep-C gang -- which is concentrated partly in the Pullman Point apartment complex off of Carlson Boulevard -- emerged as the "largest instigator."

Police Chief Chris Magnus partnered with the Contra Costa County District Attorney's Office and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration to conduct a wiretap surveillance operation on known members of the Deep-C gang, Gagan said.

Detectives began 24-hour surveillance to "listen in on and intercept members of the Deep-C gang," he said. "It was evident that on a daily basis, a majority of those gang members discussed their criminal enterprise and encouraged murder as their primary conflict resolution tool," Gagan said.

Authorities began arresting some gang members, but it was not immediately clear to the Deep-C gang that there was a wiretap, so the surveillance continued.

"We often intercepted armed subjects who we knew to be en route to commit shootings and murders," Gagan said.

The operation wrapped up when "their level of violence and propensity for violence necessitated that we end the operation and take them into custody" in ways that revealed to the gang that it had been wiretapped, he said.

Gagan said Operation Exodus likely prevented much violence.

"We're confident that this saved lives of the rival gang members and innocent citizens based on our intervention," he said.

Altogether, 23 people were arrested, including "very important people in the hierarchy" of the gang, Gagan said.

Twelve were arrested for conspiracy to commit murder, and 11 were nabbed for other serious crimes.

One person is still at large and is being sought, he said.

Sixteen search warrants were served during Operation Exodus, and 17 guns were recovered, along with $11,400 in cash.

In addition, authorities seized 934 grams of promethazine with codeine, Gagan said.

He said Operation Exodus built on work done through Richmond's Ceasefire program, which started in 2011.

The program involves community partnerships and a component in which known violent offenders are called in to meet with authorities.

During the "call-ins," the participants are offered job counseling, drug treatment, anger management classes and other services aimed at steering them away from crime.

They are also told that if they don't change their ways, police will come after them, Gagan said.

Gagan said Ceasefire, which mirrors a crime-fighting strategy also used in other cities, including Oakland, has targeted roughly 70 people believed to be responsible for most violence in the city.

"If they were to put down their guns, violent crime would drop off dramatically in the city of Richmond," Gagan said.

FAA Lifts Landing Restriction At SFO For Foreign Air Carriers

The Federal Aviation Administration has lifted a temporary restriction at San Francisco International Airport that prevented foreign airlines from landing side by side, a spokesman said.

The temporary restriction, which required solo approaches by foreign flights landing on SFO's parallel runways, was put in place two weeks after the July 6 crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214.

The restriction was lifted on Thursday when SFO's instrument landing system was put back into service, FAA spokesman Allen Kenitzer said.

The "glide slope" landing system, which communicates real-time information about an airplane's descent path to the cockpit, had been turned off at SFO when Asiana Airlines Flight 214 approached the airport too slow and too low and crashed, killing three passengers and injuring more than 180.

The system is not a mandatory tool and had been turned off at the airport since June to accommodate a construction project, SFO spokesman Doug Yakel said.

The FAA had said that the landing restriction on foreign carriers was put in place following an increase of aborted landings or "go-arounds" at SFO.

A pilot in the cockpit of Flight 214 had requested a go-around just seconds before the plane crashed, according to the National Transportation Safety Board, which is continuing its investigation into the disaster.

A full report should be complete in 12 to 18 months from the date of the crash.

62-Year-Old Construction Worker Killed While Laying Asphalt At King Middle School In Berkeley

A 62-year-old construction worker laying asphalt at Berkeley's Martin Luther King Jr. Middle School was killed when a big-rig rolled over him Tuesday afternoon, a California Division of Occupational Safety and Health spokesman said.

The worker was rebuilding a running track at the middle school, located at 1781 Rose St., when around 12:45 p.m. a big-rig parked on a slope started rolling, Cal/OSHA spokesman Peter Melton said.

The truck rolled over him and crushed him, Melton said.

No other employees were injured in the incident, he said.

The Livermore man was an employee for the San Jose-based Robert A. Bothman construction company and the crew had been contracted by the Berkeley Unified School District.

The worker's name has not been released pending notification of his family, according to the Alameda County coroner's bureau.

A state safety inspector was sent to the scene Tuesday and the case will be investigated for up to six months, Melton said.

In the past five years the construction company had no reported safety violations, Melton said.

The school opens today.

Two Men Killed Monday In Rollover Crash On Highway 280 In Burlingame Identified

Two people who were killed in a crash in Burlingame on Monday have been identified as Daly City resident Zhong Liang Li and San Francisco man Henry Huanyu Situ, both 35 years old, according to the San Mateo County coroner's office.

The two men and a third passenger were in a Volkswagen sedan heading north on Interstate Highway 280 at about 5:20 p.m., California Highway Patrol Officer Moises Escoto said.

For reasons that are still under investigation by the CHP, the driver of the sedan lost control and the vehicle drifted off the roadway south of Trousdale Drive, Escoto said.

The vehicle overturned several times and landed near several trees about 15 feet down an embankment on the right side of the highway, Escoto said.

Li and Situ were pronounced dead at the scene, he said.

A third passenger was taken to Stanford Hospital as a precaution, he said.

No other vehicles appeared to have been involved, according to the CHP.

It has not been determined if drugs or alcohol were factors in the crash, which remains under investigation by the CHP.

Family Members, Rep. Pelosi Reflect On Legacy Of Late Artist Ruth Asawa

A crowd of students, parents, artists, family members, local dignitaries and supporters filled the benches at the music concourse in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park late Tuesday morning to remember the renowned sculptor Ruth Asawa.

Asawa passed away on Aug. 6.

She was 87.

The Japanese-American artist had been a strong advocate of integrating art and education at San Francisco schools and started the School of the Arts.

The high school at 555 Portola Drive was renamed for her in 2010.

At her memorial service attended by hundreds Tuesday at the bandshell in the park area in between the M.H. de Young Museum and the California Academy of Sciences, several family members reflected on the well-known artist, along with U.S. Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-San Francisco.

Asawa's grandson Xavier Lanier lauded his grandmother's work to create the School of the Arts.

"My grandma created a place that talent like this did not go to waste," he said.

He noted that her time spent in interment camps with her family along with more than 110,000 other Japanese-Americans during World War II influenced her art.

"She survived an incredible time," he said.

Asawa was known for her wire sculptures and paintings, many of which are on display at the de Young Museum.

Many of her public commissions are on display in San Francisco and other parts of the Bay Area, including fountains at San Francisco's Ghirardelli Square and outside the Grant Hyatt near Union Square.

Her Japanese American Internment Memorial Sculpture is on display at the Federal Building in downtown San Jose.

"She took a mess of metal and turned it into a masterpiece," her grandson said.

Her youngest daughter Addie Lanier spoke about Asawa's declining health in the last part of her life, and how in the last five years of her life she was bedridden and unable to use her hands.

"Her hands were so important," Addie Lanier said. "She cooked, she sculpted, she drew."

On the back of the program for Tuesday's service was a recipe Asawa had concocted for ginger garlic salad dressing.

"She really cared about sharing with the next generation," Addie Lanier said.

Pelosi spoke about Asawa as a friend and said she considered her an integral component of the San Francisco arts and education scene.

"Ruth Asawa loved San Francisco and the feeling was mutual," Pelosi said. "This city adored her."

Pelosi vowed to tell her colleagues in Congress about Asawa's legacy and influence.

"It's really important for Congress to know the breadth of her work and the depth of respect she commanded," Pelosi said. "Ruth will be forever remembered."

DA Gascon Announces Expansion Of Anti-Truancy Program To Second School

A San Francisco anti-truancy program is expanding to a second high school starting this year, the city's district attorney announced Tuesday.

District Attorney George Gascon is expanding the program to Ida B. Wells Continuation High School after developing it over the past two years at Burton High School.

The school, which overlooks Alamo Square, provides an alternative learning environment for high school students with a history of low attendance or low academic achievement, and will now have two new counselors available to work with chronically truant students.

The district attorney's office has allocated $65,000 from its general fund for the two part-time counselors, as well as the same amount for two counselors to continue at Burton, where the program began in 2011.

Gascon said he hopes to eventually expand the program into every high school in the city.

"The work here does matter and is making a difference," he said.

He said after a student does not show up for school on time, a counselor in the program begins calling the student and family members to find out their whereabouts.

"It's a very immediate process," he said. "They'll do whatever it takes."

Gascon said the engagement of family and friends is important to prevent truancy, which often leads to students dropping out of school and getting into trouble.

"It takes the entire community to work on this," he said.

Ida B. Wells principal Richard Duber said the grant will help the school "create that personal connection, that bond that we know is the basis to enhance attendance."

Duber said, "Students have to know there's someone out there that cares, and students and their families have to know there's a support system."

Officials say chronic and habitual truancy has dropped 31 percent in the San Francisco Unified School District since 2007, when the district attorney's office began a partnership with the school district to combat the problem.

Families in need of truancy-related assistance are encouraged to contact the school district at (415) 241-3030.

3 Acres Burn In Vegetation Fire That Destroys Greenhouse in Novato

A greenhouse was destroyed in a vegetation fire in Novato this afternoon, a Marin County fire battalion chief said.

A resident in the Indian Valley area who saw smoke coming from a hillside in the west reported the fire at 1:11 p.m., Marin County fire Battalion Chief Mike Giannini said.

The fire was found burning several miles west of U.S. Highway 101 off Cabro Ridge. Firefighters attacked it on the ground and with air tankers dropping retardant.

The fire was prevented from spreading shortly after 2 p.m., and declared contained just before 3 p.m., Giannini said.

Three acres were charred in the blaze, Giannini said, which threatened homes in the area but spread to no inhabited structures, but did destroy a greenhouse.

No evacuations were ordered and no injuries were reported, he said.

Cal Fire and fire departments from Marinwood, San Rafael and Kentfield also responded.

Weather Forecast For The San Francisco Bay Area

Cloudy skies and dense patchy fog are expected in the Bay Area this morning, becoming partly cloudy later in the day.

Highs are likely to be in the 60s to lower 70s, with westerly winds up to 20 mph.

Partly cloudy skies are expected this evening, becoming mostly cloudy with patchy fog after midnight.

Lows are likely to be in the mid 50s to lower 60s, with westerly winds up to 20 mph.

Mostly cloudy skies and patchy fog are likely Thursday morning.

Highs are expected to be in the 60s to lower 70s, with westerly winds up to 20 mph in the afternoon.

 

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Appeals Court Leaves State Shark Fin Ban In Place

A federal appeals court in San Francisco refused to block a California law Tuesday that bans the possession and sale of shark fins that are detached from shark bodies.

Two Asian-American groups claim the law, which went fully into effect on July 1, discriminates against Chinese Americans because it prevents them from engaging in the traditional cultural practice of eating shark fin soup at ceremonial occasions.

A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a decision in which U.S. District Judge Phyllis Hamilton of Oakland declined to issue a preliminary injunction suspending the ban.

The appeals court said the two groups "presented no persuasive evidence indicating that the California Legislature's real intent was to discriminate against Chinese Americans rather than to accomplish the law's stated humanitarian, conservationist and health goals."

The case now goes back to Hamilton's court for further proceedings, including a possible full trial on whether there should be a permanent injunction against the law.

The court said that other issues in the case, including U.S. government claims that the law may interfere with federal management of fisheries, could be considered during the further proceedings.

The purpose of the law, according to the Legislature, is to "help ensure that sharks do not become extinct as a result of shark finning."

Shark finning is the practice of catching a shark, cutting off the fins, and throwing the body of the fish back into the water to die.

The law went partially into effect on January 1, but allowed restaurants and individuals to use or sell previously legally obtained fins until July 1.

It was challenged in a lawsuit filed against state officials last year by the San Francisco-based Chinatown Neighborhood Association and the Burlingame-based Asian Americans for Political Advancement.

A lawyer for the two organizations was not immediately available for comment Tuesday.

The Humane Society of the United States, which became a party in the case to join the state in defending the law, applauded the decision.

Jennifer Fearing, the society's California senior state director, said, "Federal courts have now ruled twice to keep California's landmark shark fin law in place, rejecting the efforts from shark finning proponents to block enforcement of the law."

"The new shark fin law is a critical tool in eliminating the market for shark fins in California and ending our state's role in facilitating this cruel and wasteful practice," Fearing maintained.

 

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Weather Forecast For The San Francisco Bay Area

Cloudy skies and dense patchy fog are expected in the Bay Area this morning, becoming partly cloudy later in the day.

Highs are likely to be in the 60s to lower 70s, with westerly winds up to 20 mph.

Partly cloudy skies are expected this evening, becoming mostly cloudy with patchy fog after midnight.

Lows are likely to be in the mid 50s to lower 60s, with westerly winds up to 20 mph.

Mostly cloudy skies and patchy fog are likely Thursday morning.

Highs are expected to be in the 60s to lower 70s, with westerly winds up to 20 mph in the afternoon.

 

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Family Members, Rep. Pelosi Reflect On Legacy Of Late Artist Ruth Asawa

A crowd of students, parents, artists, family members, local dignitaries and supporters filled the benches at the music concourse in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park late this morning to remember the renowned sculptor Ruth Asawa.

Asawa passed away on Aug. 6.

She was 87.

The Japanese-American artist had been a strong advocate of integrating art and education at San Francisco schools and started the School of the Arts.

The high school at 555 Portola Drive was renamed for her in 2010.

At her memorial service attended by hundreds today at the bandshell in the park area in between the M.H. de Young Museum and the California Academy of Sciences, several family members reflected on the well-known artist, along with U.S. Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-San Francisco.

Asawa's grandson Xavier Lanier lauded his grandmother's work to create the School of the Arts.

"My grandma created a place that talent like this did not go to waste," he said.

He noted that her time spent in interment camps with her family along with more than 110,000 other Japanese-Americans during World War II influenced her art.

"She survived an incredible time," he said.

Asawa was known for her wire sculptures and paintings, many of which are on display at the de Young Museum.

Many of her public commissions are on display in San Francisco and other parts of the Bay Area, including fountains at San Francisco's Ghirardelli Square and outside the Grant Hyatt near Union Square.

Her Japanese American Internment Memorial Sculpture is on display at the Federal Building in downtown San Jose.

"She took a mess of metal and turned it into a masterpiece," her grandson said.

Her youngest daughter Addie Lanier spoke about Asawa's declining health in the last part of her life, and how in the last five years of her life she was bedridden and unable to use her hands.

"Her hands were so important," Addie Lanier said. "She cooked, she sculpted, she drew."

On the back of the program for today's service was a recipe Asawa had concocted for ginger garlic salad dressing.

"She really cared about sharing with the next generation," Addie Lanier said.

Pelosi spoke about Asawa as a friend and said she considered her an integral component of the San Francisco arts and education scene.

"Ruth Asawa loved San Francisco and the feeling was mutual," Pelosi said. "This city adored her."

Pelosi vowed to tell her colleagues in Congress about Asawa's legacy and influence.

"It's really important for Congress to know the breadth of her work and the depth of respect she commanded," Pelosi said. "Ruth will be forever remembered."

After the ceremony, art conservator Elisabeth Cornu recalled working with Asawa for a de Young exhibit in 2006. 

"I was very impressed," she said. "She was a force of nature." 

Fellow sculptor Marilyn Rodriguez said the two artists would discuss their work and techniques.

"She was very humble," she said.

Lynne Sonenberg remembered Asawa as a supportive friend.

"She encouraged me to do my own art," she said.

Asawa wore many hats -- mother, grandmother, artist and education advocate -- Sonenberg said, and "she never stopped moving."

"She was very attentive, she was always useful. She always took care of everything," she said.

Asawa lived with her husband, architect Albert Lanier, in San Francisco's Noe Valley neighborhood for most of her adult life.

She raised six children in the city.

The artist served as commissioner on the city's Arts Commission in the 1960s and into the 1970s and was a trustee for the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco.

High school students from the School of the Arts performed at the ceremony, including the choir, which sang Leonard Bernstein's "Make Our Garden Grow."

More about Asawa's life and artwork is available at www.ruthasawa.com.

Donations to the Ruth Asawa Fund, a nonprofit that supports arts programming at San Francisco public schools, can also be made on the website.

 

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Brown Announces $315 Plan To Expand Prison Capacity To Comply With Population Cap

Gov. Jerry Brown today announced a plan to comply with a federal court limit on prison overcrowding by leasing more space for nearly 8,000 inmates from county jails, private facilities and other states for $315 million.

The limit order, issued by a three-judge panel and upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2011, requires the state to cap its prison population at 137.5 percent of design capacity.

"The only way to comply that is consistent with public safety is to purchase additional space. So that's the plan," Brown said at a Sacramento news conference.

Brown said he believes the alternative of releasing more prisoners to meet the cap would endanger public safety.

A crowd of Democratic and Republican legislators and law enforcement representatives who joined him at the conference said they agreed.

Assembly Speaker John Perez, D-Los Angeles, said, "Now that the courts have tied our hands, we have two options: the release or this option. We're not going to release additional prisoners."

State Senate Republican Leader Bob Huff, R-Diamond Bar, said Senate Republicans support the proposal because "we believe the safety of California families should be our first and foremost priority."

The $315 million plan requires the approval of the Legislature, which Perez said he hopes will come quickly.

Details of the proposal, including exactly where the additional space will be found, will be given in proposed legislation to be unveiled Wednesday, Perez said.

The speaker said he hopes the bills will go through the Assembly budget committee on Thursday.

The population cap order came after two federal judges presiding over civil rights lawsuits filed by prisoners concluded that severe overcrowding was the cause of woefully inadequate medical and mental health care that fell below constitutional standards.

Those two judges and a third judge then ordered the population cap.

After several unsuccessful appeals by state officials and several extensions, the deadline now stands at Dec. 31.

The state now houses 119,783 inmates in 34 adult prisons, including a new medical facility recently opened in Stockton, with a design capacity of 81,574, according to statistics provided by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.

Meeting the 137.5 percent cap thus requires either reducing the population by 7,619 inmates or expanding capacity by that number.

Donald Specter, a lawyer for the inmates, called the plan "expensive and wasteful."

"It's going to increase prison capacity without any advancement of public safety," said Specter, who said he believes that more low-risk, ill and elderly prisoners could be released without harm.

Brown noted that the population has been reduced by 46,000 since 2006 and said he doesn't think any more prisoners can be safely released.

About half the reduction is the result of a realignment policy that shifts low-level offenders to county jails.

The three-judge panel was convened under a U.S. law that provides that in prison civil rights cases, an order to reduce inmate population can be made only by a three-judge court and not by a single judge.

 

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FAA Lifts Landing Restriction At SFO For Foreign Air Carriers

The Federal Aviation Administration has lifted a temporary restriction at San Francisco International Airport that prevented foreign airlines from landing side by side, a spokesman said.

The temporary restriction, which required solo approaches by foreign flights landing on SFO's parallel runways, was put in place two weeks after the July 6 crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214.

The restriction was lifted on Thursday when SFO's instrument landing system was put back into service, FAA spokesman Allen Kenitzer said.

The "glide slope" landing system, which communicates real-time information about an airplane's descent path to the cockpit, had been turned off at SFO when Asiana Airlines Flight 214 approached the airport too slow and too low and crashed, killing three passengers and injuring more than 180.

The system is not a mandatory tool and had been turned off at the airport since June to accommodate a construction project, SFO spokesman Doug Yakel said.

The FAA had said that the landing restriction on foreign carriers was put in place following an increase of aborted landings or "go-arounds" at SFO.

A pilot in the cockpit of Flight 214 had requested a go-around just seconds before the plane crashed, according to the National Transportation Safety Board, which is continuing its investigation into the disaster.

A full report should be complete in 12 to 18 months from the date of the crash.

 

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Paid for by Phil Ting for Assembly 2012. FPPC ID# 1343137