Infringing on San Francisco Values Isn’t a Punch Line

With an unemployment rate near 9% and a $300 million budget deficit, there are more important things in San Francisco to cut than the rights of families. Let’s cut off the jokes right now.

OK, now.

You may have heard recently that the proponents of a San Francisco-wide ban on male circumcision have actually received enough signatures to have the measure appear on November’s ballot.

That’s right. San Francisco, the beacon of acceptance and progressive ideals, will be asked to outlaw something that has for thousands of years been a private family decision that is based on health and/or religious beliefs.

The proposal – which makes circumcision of a male under 18 a crime punishable by $1,000 fine or a year in jail – is a clear violation of privacy, free exercise of religion enshrined in the Constitution of the United States and values of freedom and tolerance that have been shared by generations of San Franciscans.

Fortunately, most San Franciscans are quickly rejecting this extreme measure. And our Reset Poll shows the proposal has almost no chance of passing in November. Of the 1,774 likely San Francisco voters in our online poll, fully 88% are currently planning to vote against the ban.

Banning circumcisions is an affront to individual religious freedom of Muslims and Jews, who both practice circumcision. Perhaps the only good thing about this unfortunate distraction is that it has already succeeded in bringing some Jews and Muslims together to protect shared values.

Beyond the religious intolerance of this proposed ban lies the question – aren’t there more important things to worry about in this city?

San Francisco continues to stare at a near 9% unemployment rate and is fighting everyday to survive a $300 million budget deficit – a San Francisco budget deficit that is projected to total nearly $1 billion over the next three years. We’ve got so many real issues to discuss. 

This particular campaign can’t be over fast enough.

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Paid for by Phil Ting for Assembly 2012. FPPC ID# 1343137